How much do you have to pay to keep from feeding your cat animal digest (ughh!)?
I am helping the neighborhood cats out right now...and there are a lot of them...and I refuse to feed them animal manure as seem to be in all the dry food I have come across!
Anyone know of any clean dry cat foods that don't cost too much, so I can help out more wild neighborhood cats?
Mark
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How much do you have to pay to keep from feeding your cat animal digest (ughh!)? I am helping the ... any clean dry cat foods that don't cost too much, so I can help out more wild neighborhood cats? Mark

Lots of info about outdoor cats here:
http://www.alleycat.org
How much do you have to pay to keep from feeding your cat animal digest (ughh!)? I am helping the ... of any clean dry cat foods that don't cost too much, so I can help out more wild neighborhood cats?

Mark, is there a trap, neuter, release program in your area? You are not really helping the big picture if you are supporting these cats so they can breed and make more cats that will suffer.
How much do you have to pay to keep from ... much, so I can help out more wild neighborhood cats?

Mark, is there a trap, neuter, release program in your area? You are not really helping the big picture if you are supporting these cats so they can breed and make more cats that will suffer.

It is my current observation (correct me if this is not right) that animals in the wild tend to multiply until their environment can no longer support them. This has worked on Earth for millions of years.
How much do you have to pay to keep from ... so I can help out more wild neighborhood cats? Mark

Lots of info about outdoor cats here: http://www.alleycat.org

Neat site, thank you.
Mark
Suddenly, without warning, Mark Earnest exclaimed (10/30/2009 5:47 PM):
Mark, is there a trap, neuter, release program in your ... they can breed and make more cats that will suffer.

It is my current observation (correct me if this is not right) that animals in the wild tend to multiply until their environment can no longer support them. This has worked on Earth for millions of years.

Not really. What tends to happen is they overpopulate terribly, then die off in droves from diseases caused and easily spread by overpopulation and sickness when the food supply cannot support the population.
The availability of food from humans and around human habitation throws the wild equation out the window.
Seen this in deer and rabbits, can't see it'd be any different with cats.

jmc
Suddenly, without warning, Mark Earnest exclaimed (10/30/2009 5:47 PM):

It is my current observation (correct me if this is ... them. This has worked on Earth for millions of years.

Not really. What tends to happen is they overpopulate terribly, then die off in droves from diseases caused and easily spread by overpopulation and sickness when the food supply cannot support the population.

I just can't see this. There are animals all over the world living just fine
in their given environments. Especially protected animals, like our cats.
The availability of food from humans and around human habitation throws the wild equation out the window.

Humans are just a part of the ecosystem to the cats. Humans are just as likely to provide sustenance to the cat as a totally wild environment.
Seen this in deer and rabbits, can't see it'd be any different with cats.

Cats are a lot smarter than deer and rabbits.
See how quickly they figure out just who to come up to, to ask for a helping hand.
A group of them have already outsmarted me with their purrs and tranquil eye gazes!
I firmly believe felines know how to judge the ecosystem before getting it on with other felines.
Suddenly, without warning, Mark Earnest exclaimed (10/30/2009 10:29 PM):
Suddenly, without warning, Mark Earnest exclaimed (10/30/2009 5:47 PM): Not ... and sickness when the food supply cannot support the population.

I just can't see this. There are animals all over the world living just fine in their given environments. Especially protected animals, like our cats.

What you are forgetting is the predator factor. Predators of a species are absolutely critical to a healthy, sustainable population. These deer, rabbits and cats do not have natural predators (or have few) in human habitation areas, so the populations are not naturally kept in check.

I've watched deer populations in isolated pockets go from healthy individuals, to tons of deer that seem to get scrawnier every year, to a decline in the number I see. I've seen rabbits overpopulate horrifically (you'd look out in to the field and it'd seem like there was one rabbit per square foot), then essentially go extinct in an area due to myximatosis (sp?).
The availability of food from humans and around human habitation throws the wild equation out the window.

Humans are just a part of the ecosystem to the cats. Humans are just as likely to provide sustenance to the cat as a totally wild environment.

You are also forgetting that domestic cats are not wild. They are feral, and there is a big difference.
Seen this in deer and rabbits, can't see it'd be any different with cats.

Cats are a lot smarter than deer and rabbits. See how quickly they figure out just who to come up to, to ask for a helping hand.

Which makes the problem worse. No natural predators, a lot of help, they'll easily overpopulate with nothing checking their population. Why do you think TNR was needed in the first place?
A group of them have already outsmarted me with their purrs and tranquil eye gazes! I firmly believe felines know how to judge the ecosystem before getting it on with other felines.

Sorry, I think you're anthromorphising. If a tom is near a receptive female, do you REALLY think he's gonna look around and say, "Hmm, seems quite a lot of us here. I think I'll pass on sex for a while."? Heck, most HUMANS don't even do that!!!
jmc
Suddenly, without warning, Mark Earnest exclaimed (10/30/2009 10:29 PM):

I just can't see this. There are animals all over the world living just fine in their given environments. Especially protected animals, like our cats.

What you are forgetting is the predator factor. Predators of a species are absolutely critical to a healthy, sustainable population. ... not have natural predators (or have few) in human habitation areas, so the populations are not naturally kept in check.

Man does just fine without predators. Why shouldn't cats?
I've watched deer populations in isolated pockets go from healthy individuals, to tons of deer that seem to get scrawnier ... seem like there was one rabbit per square foot), then essentially go extinct in an area due to myximatosis (sp?).

Creatures live and they die. Happens to the very best of us.
Humans are just a part of the ecosystem to the ... provide sustenance to the cat as a totally wild environment.

You are also forgetting that domestic cats are not wild. They are feral, and there is a big difference.

Then you haven't seen the wild, self sustaining cats in my neighborhood.

Cats are smarter than humans in many ways.
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