Hi all,
Could I please have your views on the castration of dogs, both for and against.
Jake is just over 6 months. He has, in the past week, started taking an interest in other doggie scents and attempted to *** his leg up. Tonight I have had, for the first time, about 20 minutes of his undivided attention - or should I say my arm has, as he has tried his hardest to mount it and, how can I say this, showed me everything he has got Emotion: smile
I'm not going to rush out and take him to the vets of course but, he is a strong willed dog and I am interested in other peoples opinions on whether castration would be adviseable and your experiences with your dogs too. Also, for those for the op - what is the best age?

Thanks, don't know what I'd do without this newsgroup Emotion: smile

Lynda
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Hi all, Could I please have your views on the castration of dogs, both for and against. Jake is just ... for the op - what is the best age? Thanks, don't know what I'd do without this newsgroup Emotion: smile Lynda

Unless he is a top show prospect, neutering should be mandatory. It makes for happier healthier dogs and owners. There are already enough pets in this world, and more don't need to be accidentally created if he were to dig out or slip out the door, both of which are far more common with intact animals. As for when it should be scheduled, before sexual maturity is ideal, so you are already a bit late.
Could I please have your views on the castration of dogs, both for and against.

For males, it should be done at birth.
There is no benefits to leaving a dog intact, and a lot of problems. They are far more prone to testicular cancer, to dig/jump their way out of an enclosure when they smell a dog in heat (up to 5 miles away), and to engage in marking behavior.
Canine Action Dog Trainer
http://www.canineaction.com
My Kids, My Students, My Life:
http://hometown.aol.com/dfrntdrums/myhomepage/index.html
Hi all, Could I please have your views on the castration of dogs, both for and against. Jake is just ... for the op - what is the best age? Thanks, don't know what I'd do without this newsgroup Emotion: smile Lynda

Two intact males, zero problems. They don't run away, they don't mark, they have fought a few times, but only over food, and nothing to write home about and easily stopped. They are very smart and good looking and easily trainable. I don't have to worry about their brains or bodies being negatively impacted by a lack of proper hormone levels. Zero housetraining problems. Don't have to cage them when I leave the house. Great watchdogs. They can offleash for miles everyday without running away (and do).
http://dogtv.com/kwame chazz spring03.jpg
Most of what you will hear on the "health benefits" of neutering male dogs is lies. In major European studies, male dogs who are neutered live shorter lives and are actually more prone to prostate cancer, in comparison to intact male dogs. Major studies are not done in the US, because castrating dogs is a Cash Cow for
veterinarians.
A generation of dog experts have conditioned us to believe that we can't train dogs who have all their body parts. That sex organs are some kind of cancer that needs to be cut out.
The problem is not our dogs or their body parts. The problem is the generation of dog "experts" and their ignorance, fear and incompetence.
But luckily, I (your hero) am at the forefront of an unstoppable juggernaut, which is forcing the old
guard to change or cease to exist as a relevant force in the Dog Game, proper.
I hope that was of heelp to you.

this is michael
reporting live...
http://dogtv.com
Could I please have your views on the castration of dogs, both for and against.

For males, it should be done at birth.

Birth? The testicles haven't descended yet. 6-9 months is more like it. The only reason, and it is a good one, to neuter earlier is if the pup comes from a shelter that thinks neutering better be done now or it won't get done at all.
Lia
Could I please have your views on the castration of dogs, both for and against.

For males, it should be done at birth.

you are disturbed.

this is michael
reporting live...
http://dogtv.com
Birth? The testicles haven't descended yet. 6-9 months is more like it. The only reason, and it is a good ... pup comes from a shelter that thinks neutering better be done now or it won't get done at all. Lia

Yup! Early S/N has made guaranteed compliance a reality. It used to be (many years ago) that adopters left a deposit and gave it back after the surgery was done. Only people frequently opted to forfeit their deposit instead. The early S/N has been a very good thing.
I (personally) would prefer to wait until CLOSE to a year (with a medium-large breed), but last time I had it done, I made the decision to get Franklin the big snip when his milk canine's had to be pulled.
My first dog was intact for 8.5 years. Neutered for his last 7. Much more pleasant years and it was the sure cure for his prostate infection that had him peeing pure blood.
Only way any male dog stays intact around here in the future is if he's a great example of his breed and I'm doing the breed ring and possible progeny. That may be a factor in the future, and a decision that is very individual.

Janet Boss
http://bestfriendsdogobedience.com /
Birth? The testicles haven't descended yet. 6-9 months is more like it.

I used to believe that, too. But Ian Dunbar recommends doing it as early as possible. Seeing that he's a vet as well as a trainer, I'll buy it.

I would have added that intact dogs tend to be more male-to-male dog aggressive, but he said that wasn't true.
Canine Action Dog Trainer
http://www.canineaction.com
My Kids, My Students, My Life:
http://hometown.aol.com/dfrntdrums/myhomepage/index.html
I would have added that intact dogs tend to be more male-to-male dog aggressive, but he said that wasn't true.

He must be sitting inside looking at pictures of dogs these days then..
Janet Boss
http://bestfriendsdogobedience.com /
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