Cat with 6 legs!!
http://www.petfinder.com/messageboard/viewtopic.php?t=57275

More cats with extra limbs
http://www.messybeast.com/freak-conjoined.htm
Gremlin cat
http://www.livejournal.com/community/kittypix/5407819.html
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I wonder what happened to him. IF they operated. How he is doing. Did he find a home? Where he came from? etc.
Ok, I love cats, but the Gremlin cat ? I am glad he found a good home.. I prefer mine with fur.
Why amputate the legs? I saw nothing wrong with them. They didn't seem to pose a health risk.
It seems they just didn't like he was born with extra paws to love with.

Shadow Walker
Why amputate the legs? I saw nothing wrong with them. They didn't seem to pose a health risk.

Actually they pose a safety risk, at least the extra whole limb does.
It seems they just didn't like he was born with extra paws to love with.

Trouble is, if the extra whole leg was just hanging, or even imitating the normal leg (which is what usually happens - either inert dangling or mirros the other limb) instead of being under separate voluntary control, then it would get caught on things when the cat did normal cat things. The extra paw could also get badly caught up in stuff. It's okay to leave dangling extra limbs on a sheep or cow as they stay on the ground, but pretty dangerous on something that climbs.

Sarah H
Messybeast: http://www.messybeast.com
Dragonqueen:
http://www.shartwell.freeserve.co.uk/humor-site/medical-acronyms.htm Doctors' acronyms decoded
I just don't see it as a reason if the cat is kept indoors. I could see it as a problem for an outdoor cat but most rescues do not adopt without an indoor clause. The cat dose not look like a kitten and if it has lived all this time with those limbs, while living outside, then it's plainly a cosmetic thing. The limbs did not look that bad nor did they look dead, dying or hairless The cat even looked well groomed. The cat already will be adopted out with special needs so why not leave its limbs, even extras, intact?.
Shadow Walker
Shadow Walker
It's still a problem with indoor cats. Your assertion that most shelters only adopt to indoor cats is an incorrect overgeneralisation. The cat may turn out to be unsuited to indoor life especially if it grew up outdoors. It may have been handled under light sedation for photos. Even in the paranoid USA, there's a growing realisaiton that realise that cats need outdoor access in order to avoid behavioural problems or that some cats are temperamentally unsuited to indoor living and need to go somewhere that outdoor access can be provided.

Indoor cats can get caught climbing curtains, soft furnishings, blinds and even carpeted stairs. it could end up with someone who seemed nice enough, but who then turned the cat into a media sideshow. You've also overlooked the theft aspect - people like to make money out of exhibiting unusual animals or simply owning an anomaly and there are plenty of cases of unusual cats being stolen and when tracked down, the animal was simply poisoned (cases on record for winged cats).

If it needs to end up as a barn cat, the risk of theft or media circus is even greater.
Even in the paranoid USA, there's a growing realisaiton that realise that cats need outdoor access in order to avoid behavioural problems or that some cats are temperamentally unsuited to indoor living and need to go somewhere that outdoor access can be provided.

Really? I'm somehow missing this groundswell of opinion. Emotion: wink

http://www.slywy.com /
Even in the paranoid USA, there's a growing realisaiton that ... need to go somewhere that outdoor access can be provided.

Really? I'm somehow missing this groundswell of opinion. Emotion: wink

I know, we're just swamped with people here in the US who are proponents of allowing their beloved companions outside to be mangled by cars, mauled by dogs, poisoned by neighbors' rat poison or poorly disposed of antifreeze, infected with diseases, bitten by rabid raccoons, eaten by coyotes, wolves, cougars, owls, and tortured by sickos, etc., etc.
Funny, I've had indoor cats all of my life and have never experienced any "behavioural problems" in any of them - EVER*. I think the only "behavioural problems" we're *reallly talking about here are those annoying bahaviours like actually have to interact and play with your cats, and having to go to the effort of scooping a litter box. If I were too lazy to do that I might consider allowing my cats to face all the dangers of outside too!
Hugs,
CatNipped
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