http://mysmelly.com/Archive/WhatShouldIDo/cjjqx/post.htm#sc214184
I just read that post and my heart is bleeding... and at the same time I can't stop thinking now what is better for our cats? A long comfortable life indoors or a short exciting life outdoors with lots of smells and things? My thoughts are still a bit messed up after reading that post but I hope the poor cat had a wonderful exciting outdoor life...

If that happened to me I'd not let my other cats outside either so I totally understand the girl, but do we really have the right to decide what is better for our cats? We obviously want to take care of them and prevent life threatening accidents but... our cats will still want to go out. Emotion: sad I'm sorry if this post is mussy... these thoughts have been in my head for a while and now that I've read the story they have become so acute again.
In my opinion yes, we do have the right. Cats and other animals are not just pets to most of us but they are our kids. The days of running free in Egypt to catch mice in their grain bins are long gone. it's not just a few dangers for them anymore out there. There are plenty of things that can be done to bring them outside: a harness, a stroller (I know it's silly but a lot of my friends do it and it works), an outdoor climbing cage and enclosure, etc. Just my opinion. Emotion: thinking
I have no answer for that, Janis. As I wrote in that thread, we don't let Barsik outside, but sometimes I do feel bad that we deprived him of nature (if a city with all its stone, cars and roads can be called nature though!). I realize that if he was a half outdoor cat, he wouldn't have lived up to his 17 years.

At the same time, we don't lock our kids at home for their entire life even though there are many dangers for them in the outer world as well... I don't know if we do this to cats because we care about them or because we subconsciously don't want to get a trauma if, god forbid, something bad happens. Perhaps both the reasons are true. I do not know.

On the other hand, we're talking about domesticated cats, not about wild ones. To be able to survive is in the wild cat's blood, while in domesticated kitties these instincts have probably become somewhat dull (not lost of course). For example Persians... Given its placid and phlegmatic nature, I can't imagine a Persian surviving in the wild for a long period of time.

I guess we can always find many pros and cons for both letting and not letting our cats out. In the end of the day, people decide for themselves what is better for their cats.
In my view as long as the cats are well taken care of, entertained and loved, they had better stay indoors.
RuslanaAt the same time, we don't lock our kids at home for their entire life even though there are many dangers for them in the outer world as well... I don't know if we do this to cats because we care about them or because we subconsciously don't want to get a trauma if, god forbid, something bad happens. Perhaps both the reasons are true. I do not know.
No, we don't lock our kids at home, but we also don't let them run around the neighborhood by themselves before they're at an age that we feel they would be safe. We teach them not to talk to strangers, to look both ways before crossing the street, and a number of other dangers to avoid while they're out there. We only allow them out on their own when we're confident they understand these things. You can't really teach a cat the same things.

I've come so close to hitting cats while driving because they don't understand how bad a car is or they think they can get past it faster than they actually can and dart out right in front of me. Luckily I haven't hit one yet, but I've seen many lying along side the road that others have hit. I even came across one that I thought was dead until I saw her head move. I picked her up and took her to an emergency clinic, and she was in pretty bad shape. My parents had a cat before I was born that they allowed outside and someone who decided they didn't like him poisoned him. We also live just off the Mississippi, so during the cooler weather we have eagles in the area. A cat is definitely small enough for a large bird like that to carry off. There are dogs that people let roam, or cats get into their yards. Again, my parents had a dog who was great with the cats in his home, but any cat that wandered into his yard was lucky to get out alive because he was protecting his territory. There are just SO many threats to them out there that I've never felt comfortable letting mine out. They go out on my screened in front porch and that's it.

Aside from dangers, there was an experience my friend had that made me not even want to take mine out on a harness or anything. She started off with a stroller, so she could take her cat with her and the dogs when they'd walk. The cat got used to that and started wanting to go outside with her. She started taking her out on a harness with her and the dogs when she'd do things in the yard, whether it was yard work or hanging out reading a book because it was nice out. The cat started getting off the harness, so she bought a containment thing for her. The cat loved being out there, but soon it wasn't enough. She wanted to go out when SHE wanted out, not just when my friend was out there. When she didn't get what she wanted, she started peeing on my friends things. Her clothes, her books, her bed.... whatever happened to be around when she got upset about not being able to go out.
Magnus and Vincent are both indoors. They have fun with each other and they don't seem upset because of no access to the wild. We live on the 11th floor so there would be problems with letting them in and out anyways but the main reason for them being indoors is all those dangers discussed in this thread. Sadly, cities are not a safe place for a domesticated cat.
Actually both of these people are in the country so that wasn't the issue but still. Cars hit cats all the time so I'd be terrified of that too.