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The baby has yet to make an appearance, so you ... date was yesterday (Feb 28th) so we are not worried.

I was hoping for Feb 20 so you could name him after me or Khan. Alas.

What, are you February 20th? So's my sweetie (my hoomin sweetie, that is).
Marcel, I thought you'd promised me that Peanut would be born on the 20th. Are you really going to make Gen wait one more year!?

(OTOH, March 5th would do nicely, too.)
Dianne
Marcel, I thought you'd promised me that Peanut would be born on the 20th. Are you really going to make Gen wait one more year!?

Hah. I have yet to see the XBox (and subscription to XBox Live) arrive yet, so Peanut is staying in there until I get one.
(OTOH, March 5th would do nicely, too.)

Well, her Dr's appt is today. so we will see how things go.

Marcel and Moogli
From my end, my absence was caused by the hospitalization of Alex: he was hit by Kawasaki (SP?) Disease. Five days in the hospital, three weeks (and counting) recuperation at home he only started walking again about a week ago, and is still really achey.

Oh no.. poor little thing :-(. What is that, exactly? It must've scared you to death. How did the boys take being separated from each other? I'm so sorry you had to go through that.
Dianne
From my end, my absence was caused by the hospitalization ... walking again about aweek ago, and is still really achey.

Oh no.. poor little thing :-(. What is that, exactly? It must've scared you to death. How did the boys take being separated from each other? I'm so sorry you had to go through that.

KD occurs when a young child's immune system goes haywire: they start fighting an infection (in Alex's case a mild ear infection) and then the immune system starts attacking the kid's blood vessels instead. This causes a high fever that doesn't respond to antibiotics (Alex ranged between 39 and
40 degrees celius for four days), a really bad rash and inflamationthroughout the body. Even after he was treated and we got to take him home, he got hit with one of the rarer "side-effects" of the disease arthritic like pain and swelling in all the joints: that's how come he wasn't walking for a long time.
When Alex was in the hospital, Chris was at home with Grandparents we think he missed his brother, but he was getting oodles of attention. More confusing to him was why Daddy and I kept disappearing for huge stretches of time (as one or the other of us was always at the hospital with Alex). Alex was to busy being miserable I think to really miss Chris.

In some ways, it was harder when Alex came home: Chris was happy his brother was back, but couldn't understand why Alex wouldn't play with him. The fact that parents and grandparents were constantly holding/carrying Alex, and that three or four times a day Alex got "treats" (read "aspirin") and he didn't led to a giant case of "brotheritis" on Chris' part. I finally started giving Chris two rocket candies (little sugar candies that look like pills) every time Alex got his ASA.
Through it all, I just kept reminding myself that we've been lucky. This is the first illness beyond a cold either boy has ever had, we live close to a children's hospital with a specialist in KD on staff (being rare, this could easily have not been the case), and we have friends and family who are willing to upend their lives and schedules to help us out. The biggest problem I still face, now that Alex is on the mend, is that in the chaos of the last month one of the boys' pairs of snowboots have been misplaced. Four feet, two boots, more than 14" of snow: the calculations don't work ;-}
Marie
KD occurs when a young child's immune system goes haywire: they start fighting an infection (in Alex's case a mild ear infection) and then the immune system starts attacking the kid's blood vessels instead.

Ah. So it's an autoimmune disorder - they can be nasty :-(.
Even after he was treated and we got to take him home, he got hit with one of the rarer "side-effects" of the disease arthritic like pain and swelling in all the joints: that's how come he wasn't walking for a long time.

Ow... and of course no way to explain to him why he's hurting. That must've been miserable for all of you.
When Alex was in the hospital, Chris was at home with Grandparents we think he missed his brother, but he was ... disappearing for huge stretches of time (as one or the other of us was always at the hospital with Alex).

Sounds like a good opportunity for "socialization" for him without his twin, anyway. (Trying to look on the bright side here...)
In some ways, it was harder when Alex came home: Chris was happy his brother was back, but couldn't understand ... finally started giving Chris two rocket candies (little sugar candies that look like pills) every time Alex got his ASA.

That's smart of you. Twins have got to be hard enough without one having a medical crisis and the other being needy and confused at the same time.
Through it all, I just kept reminding myself that we've been lucky. This is the first illness beyond a cold ... case), and we have friends and family who are willing to upend their lives and schedules to help us out.

Yes - you're right about all this. I guess one of the reasons your situation is resonating with me is that my little brother - 3 years younger than I - had major medical problems throughout his childhood, so I can definitely sympathize with Chris' position here. And I know first-hand what kind of chaos a major medical crisis can throw a family into.
The biggest problem I still face, now that Alex is on the mend, is that in the chaos of the ... pairs of snowboots have been misplaced. Four feet, two boots, more than 14" of snow: the calculations don't work ;-}

-) I can see how that would be a problem. I'm sure, though, that what you've gone through in the last month makes challenges like this seem pretty trivial in comparison.
Hang in there, and keep us posted -
Dianne