I lost a wonderful cat to an abdominal aneurysm last night. He became paralyzed in his legs. Has anyone else had this tragedy happen? It happens so suddenly.
I lost a wonderful cat to an abdominal aneurysm last night. He became paralyzed in his legs. Has anyone else had this tragedy happen? It happens so suddenly.

I was wondering if this was thrombosis?
Karen
I lost a wonderful cat to an abdominal aneurysm last night. He became paralyzed in his legs.

My guess is your cat suffered a thromboembolus lodged at the terminal abdominal aorta (the aortic trifurcation). This type of thromboembolus usually extends down the external iliac arteries, giving it the appearance of a "saddle" hence the name: saddle thromboemboli or "saddle thrombus". Thromboembolism of the terminal aorta produces acute rear limb paresis/paralysis and pain, and a loss of the femoral pulses and pale or cyanotic pads. Some cats have smaller thromboemboli that lodge in one femoral artery so only one limb is affected, or in a brachial artery, or in another smaller artery. In other cats, a very large thromboembolus lodges in the mitral valve orifice, the left ventricle, or the proximal aorta at the region of the brachiocephalic trunk, causing sudden death. But saddle thrombi are the most common.
Regardless of the final destination, thrombus formation in cats usually occurs in some region of the left heart - probably in an enlarged left atrium and more than likely in the left auricle. IOW, your cat probably had undiagnosed heart disease - hyperthrophic cardiomyopathy in particular. Saddle thrombus is one of the most devastating complications associated with myocardial diseases in cats.
.
Has anyone else had this tragedy happen?

Too many times. The screams of agonizing pain still haunt me to this day.

I'm very sorry for your loss.
Phil.
I lost a wonderful cat to an abdominal aneurysm last night. He became paralyzed in his legs.

My guess is your cat suffered a thromboembolus lodged at the terminal abdominal aorta (the aortic trifurcation). This type of thromboembolus usually extends down the external iliac arteries, giving it the appearance

That's what killed one of my cats. His back feet wouldn't work one morning. The vet said that it was one of three things, and that was one of them. Off we went to the animal hospital and I was told that I could treat it but that there was certainly an underlying heart disease. They could try to dissolve the clot and if he survived the next few days he might live a year or two without any bad complications.
I told them to treat him but a few hours later got a call that his heart was filled with clots and there was no point in trying any longer. They put him to sleep.