Xena is still on antibiotics and prescription diet. For another two weeks, after her second urine sample showed less crystals, but still crystals in there.
I have learned a few things but getting a urine sample. I am ready to share my knowledge about catching a sample. Would anyone want to know, how?
Regards,
Andr0
1 2
I am interested in knowing how you got the sample. I have a couple of kittens and want to regularly test the ph of their urine so I can head off future problems.
Al Kondo
Hi Al Kondo,
Sorry it took me so long to answer; it's the time difference - I am in the 'country of Oz'.
As to the sample:The only difficult thing is to know when your cat is going to pee. This is why I always advocate that every domestic cat should have a litter tray. Many people think they are so smart; their cat does it in the garden. They may be lucky - if it is particularly resistant to urinary tract diseases. Once you can see your cat approaching the litter box, it is a piece of cake! If you want to get a sample, all you need is to is to be prepared and ready: You need to have: a clean, sterilized container (your vet will give you one; I crashed mine so I had to use something else.

I use small glass jam, mustard etc. jars - they just need to be well washed, and I disinfected them by scorching inside with boiling water.
Next thing you need is something flexible and possibly nearly flat to catch the urine into. I use a takeaway container that is microwavable. Again, very clean and scorched with boiling water. I have these items ready near the litter box.
When I want a sample, I move the litter box so that it is as much approachable from all around as possible.Once your cat approaches the box, and gets ready to pee, you have just enough time to grab the 'catch tray' (e.g.. takeaway container). Wait till your cat starts peeing. Put your 'catch tray' under its bum and...catch it! once the cat starts the business, it won't stop till it's done. Once you have it, transfer it straitaway into the sample bottle. Give it a few minutes to cool, then put in the fridge if you have hours before seeing the vet. A sample will hold in the fridge for about 24 hours.

*Additional hints: Since you have kittens, they may respond to training that Xena and I gave each other: I used to praise her heaps for using the litter tray. She in turn wanted to please me, and thought, that the best idea to get me to know how well she has done, was to call me when she was ready to make a 'deposit'. It often happens in the best part of a movie, and not during a commercial break, but I am glad she calls me at all. Kittens learn quickly, so praise them heaps, and they may use them same tactic to train you.
** Hint number two: Cats usually use their box soon after a meal. Just lurk around after their dinner and...follow them.
***Cats usually don't mind if you are present while they pee. Good Luck!
Andr0 & >^^<
Thanks for the tips on retrieving urine from my kittens. Both are litter trained and are full-time house kittens. Therefore, I am familiar with their habits. As you mentioned, I too have noticed that they tend to use the litter tray shortly after a meal.

Your tip on catching their pee when they start doing it was surprising. I guess I shouldn't be surprised that they will continue once they start.. so placing a plate under them will not cause them to stop. I just wouldn't have thought of that.
Thanks for the tips. I will use them as I try to regularly measure the ph of their urine.
Al Kondo
Give it a few minutes to cool, then put in the fridge if you have hours before seeing the vet. A sample will hold in the fridge for about 24 hours.

A urine sample can start developing crystals in as little as 20 minutes and can skew the results of a urinalysis. I don't ever recommend taking a sample at home unless you go straight out the door to the vet. The best sample is one taken directly from the bladder using a syringe.

Also, since Xena has had recurring problems with UTI's why are you feeding dry food which greatly reduces her water intake? She should be on a strictly canned diet. There has been plenty of discussion on the group before regarding this and you should be able easily find helpful references in the google archives using the terms "urinary tract canned food" and "dry food water intake."
Megan
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Give it a few minutes to cool, then put in ... sample will hold in the fridge for about 24 hours.

A urine sample can start developing crystals in as little as 20 minutes and can skew the results of a ... straight out the door to the vet. The best sample is one taken directly from the bladder using a syringe.

I'll second that. My new vet told me that the urine MUST be fresh , as crystals form in standing urine.
ava
Many people think they are so smart; their cat does it in the garden. They may be lucky - if it is particularly resistant to urinary tract diseases.

This is not such a good idea - especially if you have a male cat. Its absolutely imperative that you actually see your cat eliminate at least once a day - otherwise you won't know if your cat is straining to urinate or defecate which can indicate constipation or a urinary tract obstruction - which can be fatal to a male cat. A urinary tract obstruction produces a pathophysiologic state equivalent to oliguric acute renal failure.
Wait till
your cat starts peeing. Put your 'catch tray' under its bum and...catchit! once the cat starts the business, it won't stop till it's done.

This method is good only if you're checking pH or if the sample will be examined for cyrstals within 30 minutes. This collection method is unreliable for detection of bacteria and if the sample will be cultured due to the likelyhood of contamination. Urine that will examined for bacteria and cultured should be collected via cystocentesis (needle) to avoid contamination with bacteria that normally inhabit the distal urinary tract. Its possible to establish the absence, but not the presence, of a UTI with urine collected by your method.
Once you have it, transfer it straitaway into the sample bottle. Give it a few minutes to cool, then put in the fridge if you have hours beforeseeing the vet.

This is incorrect. If the sample will be examined for crystals, its imperative that absolutely fresh urine be examined. If the urine sample is allowed to stand and cool before its examined, crystals can form in the sample, and/or the number of crystals already in the sample can greatly increase this is called "in vitro crystallization", and will render the sample practically useless and yield erroneous results which can lead to prescribing inappropiate medication or an incorrect diet that than lead more serious problems.
A sample will hold in the fridge for about 24 hours.

24 hours is way too long false-negative cultures can occur when a urinesample is refrigerated for >12 hours depending on the bacterial species in the urine or if the sample is allowed to freeze.

I appreciate your well-meant intentions. However, you might to research your ideas a bit more before sharing them. Emotion: wink
Phil.
You're welcome!
Btw, Xena is getting better all the time; her crystals have decreased considerably; I can see that her litter box activity has improved a lot, but she will have to produce a couple more samples before taken of the hook; but will remain on maintenance diet for quite a while - luckily, she loves it!) Andr0 & >^^<
With all due regard for your rescue work and housing so many cats of your own, I refuse to accept you opinion that my vet is a total idiot. I also won't get into any discussion about why I think he is doing the right thing; it would be a waste of time since your post seems to be ego-driven. Regards,
Andr0
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