Our 9 month old border collie cross has, over the past couple of weeks, taken to not wanting to come back to us when he is off the lead when there are other dogs around. When there are no dogs he's fine & will come back to us immediately. With others around (dogs or bitches) he just wants to play/be with them and not with us! Balls or treats won't get him back to us! We end up chasing him all over the beach at top volume screaming until we grab him.
He's now only on an extendable lead & is let of for short periods if no dogs are around.
We were going to have him neutered anyway, would this help? Does it sound like hormone-related?
in thread darren (Email Removed) (Darren) whittled the following words:
He's now only on an extendable lead & is let of for short periods if no dogs are around. We were going to have him neutered anyway, would this help? Does it sound like hormone-related?

It sounds like a normal untrained dog. Has anyone suggested dog training classes to you?
Our 9 month old border collie cross has, over the past couple of weeks, taken to not wanting to come ... no dogs are around. We were going to have him neutered anyway, would this help? Does it sound like hormone-related?[/nq]It sounds like your baby puppy who thought you were the best thing around and that you could magically be all places at all times turned into a teenage dog who wants to hang with his friends instead of with you and figured out that if he isn't leashed, he doesn't have to come to you when you call him. You need to work on his recall and help him to realize that he has to come when you call him whether he wants to or not. Neutering may well help his desire to roam after other dogs (and will certainly help when it comes to female dogs in heat that might be around), but it won't cure the problem.

Training will. In the meantime, keep him on a leash so that he isn't constantly reinforcing himself for blowing you off when you call him and is instead learning that when you call him, he doesn't have a choice but to come, even if you have to make him do it. Stop the screaming and chasing immediately! This will just reinforce with him that you are an angry person he might not want to come to. You want to be more enticing than freedom. Be sweet, be fun, be nice, reward him when he comes.

Then leash him so he can't do it again rather than screaming at him when he does it and teaching him that coming to you may be a bad idea when he has run off because if he does come to you, he might be in trouble.

Paula
"Anyway, other people are weird, but sometimes they have candy, so it's best to try to get along with them." Joe Bay