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I've found the easiest way, for me at least, is to sit the cat on my lap, much like you would a child with the cat's backside against me and the legs pointing outward.
Lauren

See my cats: http://community.webshots.com/album/56955940rWhxAe Raw Diet Info: http://www.holisticat.com/drjletter.html http://www.geocities.com/rawfeeders/ForCatsOnly.html Declawing Info: http://www.wholecat.com/articles/claws.htm
I never clip the claws. I don't think it's necessary and I doubt if they would let me do it anyway! The old sheaths fall off naturally.

It's necessary if your cat uses your shoulders as launchpads for ambitious leaps and landings. With untrimmed claws, the motley human's shoulder soon has the appearance of tenderised beef.

Fortunately, my cat that does this has been exceptionally well socialised - to trim his pointy bits, I simply tuck him under one arm (I'm standing) and he'll usually extend his claws for me to snip. Rear claws are a little more trouble - I flip him onto his back on my lap, and will usually drape a towel across his front paws to prevent early escape.
The other furry freak is a bit wary of even having his paws held. However, he is not a shoulder-springer, so I haven't done 'owt to his spiky weapons.
I use scissors-style clippers that have a built in guard, supposedly to prevent the idiot human from chopping away too much claw. However the guard is too ambitious - relying on it would soon lead to bloodletting from both human and cat.
Steve.
I was just wondering what your opinion is on the best tool to clip a cat's claws. Would you use ... future (the vet showed us how today) I want to make sure the best and most comfortable method is used.

I agree with Dennis C. I've used a human toenail clipper for years on kittens and on large adults with consistently quick and neat results. Frankly, I don't think there's anything quicker, because of the small size and easy manipulation of the toenail clipper. However, just like doing anything else, there's a right way and a wrong way to use a toenail clipper for trimming a cat's claws.
The cross-section of each claw is an oblong shape. The verticle direction through a claw has a greater distance than does the horizontal direction. So if you orient the nail clipper the same way that you would orient it for clipping a human toenail, then you will shear through the longer dimension of the cross-section, and will run a high risk of crushing/splitting the claw. Thus, it's imperative to shear through the narrower, easier direction through the claw. Essentially you just rotate the clipper 90 degrees from the orientation that it would be used for a human toenail. Quick and easy! I've been trimming claws of my own cats and of my girlfriend's for years and never once have I split a claw with a toenail clipper when the clipper is properly oriented.
Question: When you say toilnail clipper, are you talking about the ones that look like fingernail clippers but larger in size? Or are you talking about the toenail clippers that are a bit similar to regular scissors but have the thick head? I use the cat scissors but I'm not happy with them because they just don't seem sharp enough.
Lauren

See my cats: http://community.webshots.com/album/56955940rWhxAe Raw Diet Info: http://www.holisticat.com/drjletter.html http://www.geocities.com/rawfeeders/ForCatsOnly.html Declawing Info: http://www.wholecat.com/articles/claws.htm
on 10 Jan 2004:
From an old post (link has a pic to the scissor clippers): My experience is that the more you do ... it. Good technique and tools are esssential. I like to use the small, blunt-nosed, notched, scissor-like clippers (Groommax Cat Nail[/nq]Thanks, Lyn. I'm always on the lookout for an easier way to do this. Shadow, as you know is ~11-12 and I've never been able to clip his so they're always done at the vets. Shamrock is a little easier and I do his myself but I always have them do them when he's at the vet, too. Now, Bonnie, she is a different story. Her claws have never been clipped but I've been getting her used to having her paws handled and she sort of likes it.

She is semi-feral but loves being touched... on her own terms. But she likes her paws rubbed. She just can't be picked up, yet. Little squirmy girl is very fast when she thinks I'm going to try to pick her up. She climbed up on my lap tonight for the first time. Emotion: smile

Cheryl
I shall call him Squishy and he shall be mine. And he shall be my Squishy. Come here Squishy. Ow. Bad Squishy.
- Dori
on 10 Jan 2004:
http://tinyurl.com/ytcjb

Thanks Jon. You and Lyn posted a link to the same tool and I think I'll try that. I've been using this one:
http://tinyurl.com/2ee55
I doubt I'll ever get Shadow used to getting his claws clipped at home; even the techs at the vets office have a hard time with him and his claws. He has literally no voice when he meows but I can hear him hollaring when they take him to the clipping room when they do it. He HATES it. I hope to be able to do Bonnie's some day... soon.

Cheryl
I shall call him Squishy and he shall be mine. And he shall be my Squishy. Come here Squishy. Ow. Bad Squishy.
- Dori
I never clip the claws. I don't think it's necessary

It may become necessary. Some cats claws grow down and around, into their pads. Be sure to check them monthly.
-L.
Amber is 9 and Tiger is 4 1/2. They use the scratching post and frequently shed the outer husks (I save them in a jar). What do cats in the wild do - no one clips their claws?
-MIKE
I never clip the claws. I don't think it's necessary

It may become necessary. Some cats claws grow down and around, into their pads. Be sure to check them monthly.

It also keeps them from getting their claws stuck in things and having to try to pull it out (and the longer/sharper they are, the harder it is to pull out and it looks pretty painful).
And with dogs, if you don't do it it's bad for their joints cause it starts making them walk on their toes wrong (cause the nails start pushing the toes up when they walk).
Alice

The root cause of problems is simple overpopulation. People just aren't worth very much any more, and they know it. Makes 'em testy. ...Bev
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