Wondering if anyone thinks this would be useful for people who are "all thumbs" when it comes to clicking and treating:

http://www.inthecompanyofdogs.com/itemdy00.asp?c=&T1=D65076X&GEN1=&SKW=click+and+lick&PageNo=1
Janet Boss
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
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Wondering if anyone thinks this would be useful for people who are "all thumbs" when it comes to clicking and treating: http://www.inthecompanyofdogs.com/itemdy00.asp?c=&T1=D65076X&GEN1=&SKW=click+and+lick&PageNo=1

We
didn't always want the click to immediately stop the behavior and cause the dog to run right over to us...
Looks like a gimmick to me

heh - so is a clicker! ;-D
I got the catalog today, and was perusing all of the overpriced stuff, and thought of a recent thread.

Janet Boss
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
Wondering if anyone thinks this would be useful for people who are "all thumbs" when it comes to clicking and treating: http://www.inthecompanyofdogs.com/itemdy00.asp?c=&T1=D65076X&GEN1=&SKW=click+and+lick&PageNo=1

Not really. Looks like a gimmick to me. If you click, you don't have to present the treat immediately. In fact, it's better if there is a slight pause.

Hmm. That's being pretty widely disputed now on most of the clicker lists (that include such folks as Sue Ailsby, Melissa Alexander, etc.). The truth is, you should treat as soon as possible. Otherwise you risk treating any behavior between the click and the treat. Lots of talk on whether or not it's effective to click in the middle of the weaves and have the dog pop out to come to you for the treat. The current theory seems to be that treating in the poles is better.
I have a friend who has it stuck in her head that you have 30 seconds to get the treat out after clicking her dog really doesn't even know the treat and click belong together any more.
I use a wrist band so I don't worry about dropping the
clicker. And if someone really lacks coordination (or has problems with fine motor coordination, I would use an i-click. I ... Also great for people with arthritis and you can click it with your foot while you groom (barefoot is better)

There are some good uses for a remote control devide that spits out a treat. As an example, one of my friends upends one over her wire crate at shows. When the dog is quiet, she can trigger the remote from up to
100 feet away, it will beep and give the dog a treat. A great way toremotely reward.
Another great use is at the end of an agility obstacle. If the dog achieves the correct target behavior, the treat can be dispensed. Clean Run (www.cleanrun.com) sells several remote trainers.

I can see their use being limited for obedience but for other things? They can be very helpful.
Looks like a gimmick to me

heh - so is a clicker! ;-D I got the catalog today, and was perusing all of the overpriced stuff

I also got the catalog but this is what caught my eye..

http://www.inthecompanyofdogs.com/itemdy00.asp?c=&T1=D65056&GEN1=Dog+Accessories&SKW=dogslife+accessories&PageNo=22
Looks like a gimmick to me

heh - so is a clicker! ;-D

heh. so is an ecollar.
Not really. Looks like a gimmick to me. If you ... In fact, it's better if there is a slight pause.

Hmm. That's being pretty widely disputed now on most of the clicker lists (that include such folks as Sue Ailsby, Melissa Alexander, etc.).

Maybe a list Sue Ailsby is on, but I bet she didn't say it (unless she's changed a lot in the past 6 months) When I say pause, I'm not talking 30 seconds. I'm talking click . . . and . . . treat as opposed to click/treat. Hmn, I think I picked up that example of timing from Sue in fact.
I use a wrist band so I don't worry about dropping the

clicker. And if someone really lacks coordination (or has problems ... it with your foot while you groom (barefoot is better)

There are some good uses for a remote control devide that spits out a treat. As an example, one of ... up to 100 feet away, it will beep and give the dog a treat. A great way to remotely reward.

Oh gah. You mean like a Treat and Train (Sharper Image's skinner box)? Bob Bailey seemed ro like it (as it's very simular to what he was doing in his chicken acts). We tried one up at Suzanne Clothier's a year ago last summer. Pretty much nobody was real impressed with it. For one thing, the "beep" isn't the marker, the grinding gears (which seemed to be scary for a number of dogs) are. So you really aren't marking the behavior you want unless it's still going on when the plastic starts making lots of noise. I went ahead and got a seconds unit for $50 just because it has a wonderful floor target, and I was having trouble finding one. I haven't really found a use for the rest of the damned thing.
I can see their use being limited for obedience but for other things? They can be very helpful.

I can click and chuck treats a lot easier and cheaper. Maybe not 100 feet away. But I generally start adding distance on stuff when I've got the behavior I want. BroomSandy
heh - so is a clicker! ;-D I got the catalog today, and was perusing all of the overpriced stuff

I also got the catalog but this is what caught my eye.. http://www.inthecompanyofdogs.com/itemdy00.asp?c=&T1=D65056&GEN1=Dog+Accessories&SKW=dogslife+accessories&PageNo=22

a jingle bell from the local craft store is cheaper. Our students love those.
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