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So take a heel. Heel one
step, click and treat. Then heel 2 steps, click, treat. Progress to 3 steps, 4 steps, 5 steps, etc. The ... 1. I'm using it for stays. Sit, stay, 1 step, click. Sit, stay, 2 steps away, click., etc. It's fun!

An even easier and more fun way to go about it: Decide the place on your leg where your dog's nose should hit when in heel position. Click for getting the nose right there. Then do as you say with clicking whenever the nose is in the right spot as you step. Also remember to keep up the random nature. This is hard for me. Instead of always increasing the number of steps between clicks, every now and then, throw in a jackpot of an especially good treat or click for a behavior your dog already knows like clicking after only one step even though your dog has worked up to 10.
Lia
But what about behaviors that take place when you are not around to give those commands? Do you never provide negative consequences?

With ANY training program or philosophy, it is easier to train what you want than to eliminate what you don't want. For example, when people write to this list asking how to teach their dog not to dive through the garbage when they're not there, we usually suggest putting the garbage behind a door or up high where the dog can't reach. That's managing, not teaching, and we know that, but the other suggestions, though possible, aren't convenient or easy or they might have unwanted side effects.As to never giving negative consequences, when people use that term, they normally mean something along the lines of yelling or cuffing or shaking, but if you've got a dog that's working towards a treat, withholding that treat can be negative. It really depends on the dog. My last dog used to test us from time to time and get a swift jerk on her leash. She never showed any signs of minding a bit. She'd wag her tail as though to say "oh, so that's what you meant." I'm convinced that the jerk was a communication device that was kind in the long run because it communicated what we wanted clearly.

With my present dog all that's out of the question. Anything sharp and negative just made her fear us. We quit all that after we'd had her only a few weeks. Now we clicker train, and we're all much happier.
Lia
This message will invariably be followed by a particularly vicious one. Could you just ignore it? I'm trying to save time.
So take a heel. Heel one

step, click and treat. Then heel 2 steps, click, treat. ... click. Sit, stay, 2 steps away, click., etc. It's fun!

An even easier and more fun way to go about it: Decide the place on your leg where your dog's ... behavior your dog already knows like clicking after only one step even though your dog has worked up to 10.

The discussion that we've been having on the clicker list on this is that though the clicking seems non-random to US, it is random to the DOG.

And by nose hit, do you mean nose touch? At least in the U.S., the dog's nose can't touch. And in the U.S., for top competition heeling (in AKC and in schutzhund) you want the dog looking up, not forward.
And by nose hit, do you mean nose touch? At least in the U.S., the dog's nose can't touch. And in the U.S., for top competition heeling (in AKC and in schutzhund) you want the dog looking up, not forward.

When I wrote it, I meant touch. Now that I think about it nose in right place would be better. Cubbe started with a touch. I wasn't thinking of competition since we don't compete (nor schutzhund). The method has worked wonders to keep Cubbe from pulling. She's still distractable outside, but we're working on it.
An aside: An old friend but one Cubbe had never met came over today (just dropped by on her way back from Las Vegas to London). Cubbe did a little barking but got over it quickly and was fine.

Lia
And by nose hit, do you mean nose touch? At ... in schutzhund) you want the dog looking up, not forward.

When I wrote it, I meant touch. Now that I think about it nose in right place would be better. ... schutzhund). The method has worked wonders to keep Cubbe from pulling. She's still distractable outside, but we're working on it.

Just making sure. Nose touching would be a big no-no in AKC, which is one reason why a perfect competition heel is very difficult to train.

In the U.K, the dog can and does lay his head on the handler's leg. I actually think it looks awful because every time the handler steps forward with the left leg they whack the dog in the head. Their recall is also very different than ours. In ours, the dog must stop without touching the handler, perfectly straight, and be within reach. In the U.K., the dog comes and lays his head up the handler's groin. Much easier to get a straight sit like that, but man it looks odd. Watch Crufts sometime.
What if a certain k9 has some undesirable traits that need to be corrected; let's say he is very mouthy, ... profess to doing so, how do you stop that behavior? Do you wait for it to stop and then reward?

I don't use the clicker exclusively, so I can't comment on how one might do that. I prefer to point out to the dog in no uncertain terms that I do not condone biting under any circumstance.
I taught the puppy not to mouth by flicking him on the nose.

I really don't see anyone here professing to use clicker 100% of the time to teach the dog everything. It's nice for teaching the dog the behavior, but IME it doesn't work to convince the dog to perform constantly under all circumstances. You must provide a reason not to disobey, which with my dogs it tends to be some form of punishment (not the technical term I have trouble remembering the difference between punishment & reinforcement). This is, IMO, especially important with behaviors that will get the dog euthanized, killed, or myself sued (biting being the main one...also bolting) or behaviors that are a royal PITA (like jumping up at people food).

Emily Carroll
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apparently studies have proved that it takes less time for your brain to send a signal to your thumb to ... something to the voice box and that voice box to actually spit out a word. So your timing is better.

Ha. YOUR thumb and timing, maybe. Not mine- my voice timing is much better.
Which, btw, is one of the reasons I don't use a clicker when running agility. I'll use one to teach tricks, I'll use it to to teach small bits of specific performance on ONE obstacle (for example, working on JUST the A-frame, and clicking for hitting 2/2), but not when I'm actually running a sequence.
T'other thing about that is that Rocsi (my only clicker dog) tended to get annoyed at being clicked when we made the transition from 1-2 obstacles to longer sequences; she tends to find running the course more rewarding than food. (That, too, is part of the equation as regards clicking several times in rapid-fire sequence with weaves.)
apparently studies have proved that it takes less time for ... actually spit out a word. So your timing is better.

Ha. YOUR thumb and timing, maybe. Not mine- my voice timing is much better.

Just quoting the study. Not me, the study. Emotion: smile
Which, btw, is one of the reasons I don't use a clicker when running agility. I'll use one to teach ... rewarding than food. (That, too, is part of the equation as regards clicking several times in rapid-fire sequence with weaves.)

I very quickly wean off of clicking for action behaviors (running, etc.) and I don't use it in the weaves at all or at least rarely, and only for doing the entire set correctly. I use toys.
Just quoting the study. Not me, the study. Emotion: smile

I knew it was generic- it just struck me as funny.
I very quickly wean off of clicking for action behaviors (running, etc.) and I don't use it in the weaves at all or at least rarely, and only for doing the entire set correctly. I use toys.

Weeel- as previously stated, I used a clicker & rewarded with a toy. But yes, I faded the clicker out fairly fast.
BTW, a favorite playtime-in-the-backyard activity is playing ball with weave poles- Morag and Rocsi (esp. Mw) think this is a big fun game. Only problem is, Morag snapped off two of the poles yesterday. Damn cold weather.
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