No matter how slowly I give it to her by a medicine dropper, she aspirates it, begins coughing, and it bubbles out her nose. This is her second series of antibiotics, called Baytril. The first series was Keflex and she did not respond. Any ideas?
Another observation: vets are higher than doctors, greedy, and love to see you coming with that money. In the last 2 months, over $2500 spent on a doggie and over $500 on Daisy the cockatiel. The vet stuck us for an extra $100 by adding the word "emergency" to the bill. Time in the not-so-busy office here in WNC during regular office hours: about 15 minutes.
Another observation: vets are higher than doctors, greedy, and love to see you coming with that money. In ... to the bill. Time in the not-so-busy office here in WNC during regular office hours: about 15 minutes.[/nq]I think that varies by what region you live in and by the particular vet. In the area where I live (Greer, SC - in the "upstate" area), the vet that sees all of my animals does not charge outrageous prices for his services. In fact, many of his clients even think he under-charges and I can't think of a time when he's charged extra for seeing an animal outside of normal hours when it has been a real case of medical emergency, such as needing a C-section for delivery of babies, hit by a car or otherwise critically injured, etc..

In those cases, he waves the fee, although I've seen a few really annoying and pushy clients who called him in to the office on off-hours time to look at an animal because it was more convenient for them to not take off work and come in during normal hours. In those situations where the off-hours vet visist wasn't justified then they got charged a premium for the visit.
Do you have other vets you can make use of besides just this one?

It could be argued that in many ways, it takes more education and on-going skills development for vets than it does for doctors to enter into and remain current in their professions. A regular doctor only has to know anatomy & physiology and the ailments and health concerns for just one species. A vet, on the other hand, is expected to provide the same level of health care for pets as doctors do for people while doing so for dogs, cats, birds, rodents, reptiles & lizards and perhapps even large & small livestock as well as other more exotic types of animals. If my vet has both a wide range of experience and knowledge that allows him to effectively care for my animals then I'm not adverse to paying a fair amount of money for those services.

Chuck
If this vet is not experienced with birds, he may not have checked for psittacosis, or aspergillus. Did he do any tests to determine the exact problem?
Regards
Just a suggestion on getting your tiel to take her Baytril. Take a small piece of pound cake, let the Baytril soak in, and give that to the tiel. Hopefully, she'll munch down the pound cake treat without caring about the Baytril. It worked with my Quaker, plus he loved the extra attention. My Amazon on the other hand has to get put into a headlock and be force fed the meds... then she wipes her face in my hair.

Amy
No matter how slowly I give it to her by a medicine dropper, she aspirates it, begins coughing, and it ... to the bill. Time in the not-so-busy office here in WNC during regular office hours: about 15 minutes.

Assuming the Baytril course solves the problem, you may have to give another treatment afterwards. Baytril not only kills bad bacteria, it also kills the good digestive bacteria in the crop.

Lactobacilus tablets, crushed, and added to food (an avian hand-feeding formula) will help restore the crop's functionality.

If possible, take your bird to an Avian vet.
No matter how slowly I give it to her by ... in WNC during regular office hours: about 15 minutes.

Assuming the Baytril course solves the problem, you may have to give another treatment afterwards. Baytril not only kills bad ... in the crop. Lactobacilus tablets, crushed, and added to food (an avian hand-feeding formula) will help restore the crop's functionality.

There's also beneback, wich comes in gel form in a syringe.

~Marco~
"Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day.
Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life." Terry Pratchett, Jingo
Plain yogurt (no sugar or flavoring) is considered to be more beneficial than all of the above. It contains live cultured bacteria that compete with pathogens in the gut. Birds do not produce lactase to digest the lactose, but the bacteria do, so it is safe to use on birds. It has been proven to be more effective than Lac/Acido capsules and benebac since these contain bacterial cultures that may or may not become active.

Source: "A Flying Chance: A Manual for Rehabiliating North American Passerines, and a Survival Guide for the North American Passerine Rehabiliatator." by Nancy Eilertsen and Astrid MacLeod

These two ladies have done extensive research on avian diets and how to safely raise baby birds and treat sick and injured birds once they have been given large doses of antibiotics. Wonderful book, but geared towards wild birds of course. However, there is lots of useful information regarding general bird care and dietary requirements.