Yesterday, the weather was incredible. My husband and I decided to take the dogs on a walk around a small city park. The two dogs mentioned are terriers. (one is a 2yo Boston, the other a 11/2yo mixed terrier) Both females, both spayed. Weight for each is about 12-14lbs. Both have had basic "good behavior" classes. I guess you might call it puppy obedience. I was walking the Boston, and because she is so much more behaved with a choke collar. (I don't "choke" her, but use it for minor corrections) She is wonderfully behaved with her work collar on.

My husband was walking the mixed terrier. She only was hooked to her regular collar. She has been worked with a choke collar also, and is well behaved with it. But my husband chose not to use it yesterday. Of course, the dog pulled, choking herself and gagging the whole way. My husband, seeing my "corrections" with the choke collars and seeing results, tried the same technique with the regular collar. Of course, it was a dismal attempt. I pointed out that not only was it not good for the dog, that the slight jerks put too much stress on the throat and airway, but that it was ineffective, so he was only reinforcing the fact that the dog could disobey.
Any input?
Thanks.
Perry
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I pointed out that not only was it not good for the dog, that the slight jerks put too much stress on the throat and airway, but that it was ineffective, so he was only reinforcing the fact that the dog could disobey. Any input?

you were right! For even less stress on the airways, particularly with the Boston, I like pinch collars. I also never attach a leash to an ID collar - I want that to not ever pop off by mistake (pop open, get backed out of, etc).

Janet B
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
To the poster who replied offlist..
The Boston (who is not as brachiocephalic as most Bostons) is very well behaved and only needs, receives minor corrections. The other little terrier is not in the least brachiocephalic.
And yes, I do realise that a dog pulling on a collar is "not trained". One has to start somewhere, however. My question is an attempt to gather comments on why I think my husband's attempt at correcting with the regular collar is soo counterproductive.
Perry
in thread "Perry Templeton" (Email Removed) whittled the following words:
To the poster who replied offlist.. The Boston (who is not as brachiocephalic as most Bostons) is very well behaved ... to gather comments on why I think my husband's attempt at correcting with the regular collar is soo counterproductive. Perry

Training dogs is a LOT easier than training husbands.

Allowing a dog that wants to pull to have a comfortable collar to pull in, is just asking for a dog to pull. But for the life of me, I can't imagine pulling a comfortable endeavor. But I definitely agree with your method over his. It's much easier on the both of you.
Any input? Thanks.

Yes. Ditch the choke chains and teach your dog to walk next to you using Positive Reinforcement based methods. At this point, your choke chains sound pretty useless, your dogs are still pulling and choking themseleves. Plus you are having to correct them all the time.

Here is a good website that talks about all kinds of behavior problems. It's a clicker sight, but you don't have to use a clicker to train your dog with PR based training Emotion: smile
I teach my dogs to walk next to me on command way before I ever put a leash on them. That way there is no problem when I do attach the leash.
http://www.clickersolutions.com/articles/index.htm
Any input? Thanks.

Yes. Ditch the choke chains and teach your dog to walk next to you using Positive Reinforcement based methods. At ... pretty useless, your dogs are still pulling and choking themseleves. Plus you are having to correct them all the time.

Did you even read the original post?
Perry
Did you even read the original post?

I think her basic point still stands, whether the dog was wearing a choke collar or a flat collar. In horse terms, you want to keep the dog "off your hands." Pulling is a self-rewarding activity for dogs that like to pull (and that's one of them-there tautologies). For a lot of dogs that like to lean on the collar, teaching them where they should be relative to the human rather than trying to teach them to get off the collar can be effective. It can also be a good alternative for someone who's got lousy training collar technique, although like most other training it does require decent timing.

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Prouder than ever to be a member of the reality-based community
I think her basic point still stands, whether the dog was wearing a choke collar or a flat collar. In ... alternative for someone who's got lousy training collar technique, although like most other training it does require decent timing.

I think there may also be a case of the Boston knowing the collar is on, still may challenge once in awhile (not straining against it) and walks well knowing it's "there".
Fact is, that I think most people (APO) do a little basic training, but still always need the tools as a back up if nothing else. the wearing of a choke alone does not mean the dogs is getting corrections, or a lot of them.
My dogs almost always wear slip collars when on leash. I don't hook to ID collars and slip collars fit well in my pocket when I take them off the dogs. They are merely something around the necks to hook the leashes to.

Janet B
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
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