I was reading the remarks about releasing pets into the environment, and I was wondering if there is a website that lists which animals are native to a specific area. It seems like most responses state that it is against the law unless the species is native to the area where it is being released? I am not sure if I understood this correctly. Is there more than one view on this topic? Where is there a good source for informative websites? I have found several, but they seem to be mostly regarding snakes and snake sales. I appreciate anyone's help and information,
thank you
josh
It doesn't matter even if the habitat is the natural habitat of the species in question, it's still not a good idea to release captive herps into the wild. The captive animal could have a disease that it's wild relatives have no immunity to
There is one rule - never ever release an animal into the wild, no matter what it is. The animal is probably accustomed to captivity and as such would suffer from being released. If you cannot find anybody to take the animals (highly unlikely though) and for some reason you are unable to take care of them yourself, there is always adoption. Contact several places about adopting out your animals.
Releasing them into the environment causes a lot of problems for the wildlife and could potentially spread diseases and the animal may prey on lesser animals or compete for food and resources, and it is this very fact that is the reason we have such strict exotics laws in Australia. If people had been more careful, maybe we would be able to keep (some, not all of course) exotics.
Please be careful.
I was reading the remarks about releasing pets into the environment, and I was wondering if there is a website that lists which animals are native toa specific area.

At least as far as reptiles in the USA are concerned, I'm developing a page of state-by-state references which will answer such questions: http://www.mcmartinville.com/chris/reptiles/trips/id.htm

Besides the web, there are a multitude of field guides available, covering most of the world (if you look hard enough for the specific books).
It seems like most responses state that it is against the law unless the species is native to the area where it is being released?

It's against the law in many, if not most, states to release wildlife once it's been in captivity, PERIOD (though some states do allow it, for example some states permit release of certain species if they were held for less than 30 days). For further information, consult your area's Fish & Game Department (or its equivalent) for the legalese.
I have a page which MAY help point you in the right direction, but it's geared more towards field herping in general and not captive possession/release:
http://www.mcmartinville.com/chris/reptiles/trips/equip.htm#License

Chris
http://www.mcmartinville.com
To add to this, in many states the only people who may legally re-release animals are state licensed animals rehabilitators. They know and follow quarantine procedures laid down by their state, to minimize the hazards of releasing possibly infectious animals.

Chad
To add to this, in many states the only people who may legally re-release animals are state licensed animals rehabilitators. They know and follow quarantine procedures laid down by their state, to minimize the hazards of releasing possibly infectious animals. =A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0Chad
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True for Fla.
later, Snake Whisperer
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