After my Pipsie (almost four years old female free flying in our apartment, nandayus conure) chewed some holes in our king size mattress box, she disappears in it for hours. I suspected she laid an egg or two but this is not the case. Every evening she disappears in the mattress and sometimes it takes over an hour to lure our sweet Pipsie out of her hiding place. She IS VERY spoiled but although the high cost of damages, Edith and I decided that she is worth it.

By the way, she is not as loud as conures can be. Food: Pllets and water all day and a mixed vegetable salad (chopped) is available to her for 3 hour every day. She is a kisser but sometimes she bits as well thinking it is a game. Her love is indescribable; she is very jealous but replaces me with Edith when I am not available. She can be mean to strangers she dioesn't like. She know some 8 tricks but talks only 5 words. Well this was some background...

The question, how do I get her out of the mattress box before she has to sleep in her cage at 8 PM. Every answer is really appreciated. Uri-Toronto
1 2
After my Pipsie (almost four years old female free flying in our apartment, nandayus conure) chewed some holes in our ... the mattress box before she has to sleep in her cage at 8 PM. Every answer is really appreciated. Uri-Toronto

In many parrots the nesting instinct is strong. Perhaps you could provide her with a more suitable nesting box than the matress. In the wild many parrots use hollowed holes in trees. If you just plug the hole in the matress you'll probably find a hole in the wall soon. My macaw pair were cbewing through the drywall until I made them a nest box made out of plywood. Make the entrance hole a little undersize out of pine and let her modify it to fit. Does she really have to sleep in the cage?
After my Pipsie (almost four years old female free flying in our apartment, nandayus conure) chewed some holes in our ... the mattress box before she has to sleep in her cage at 8 PM. Every answer is really appreciated. Uri-Toronto[/nq]As Lou mentioned I would also recommend trying to offer something better. I have a flighted Tiel and Blue Crown Conure. The BCC has never been much trouble, he normally only goes where he is allowed. The Tiel was for a long time becoming a problem with the nesting thing. Every spring he gets real hormonal and nasty about it. What I started doing was I would make a small cardboard box. cut a tiny hole in it and set it behind his living area. He would spend many hours working on it till he could get into it, then would spend a lot of time in it.

He then stopped trying to make nests in all the wrong places. Now I just make him up a new box now and then when one gets beat up. They both sleep un caged. The Tiel just picks a perch on his area he shares with the Conure. The BCC will normally go to the Macaws stand after the Macaw goes to bed since he sleeps in the bedroom. Once the lights go down in the living room they stay put and do not fly. They will stay that way till we get up in the morning and turn on the lights or open the drapes.

"Everything in excess! To enjoy the flavor of life, take big bites. Moderation is for monks."
(Lazarus Long)
(Email Removed) =D7=9B=D7=AA=D7=91:
Thanks so much Luis and Boyd. Sorry for any technical mistakes with this posting I will improve in time=E2=80=A6
I am impressed with your replies that express similar ideas. Right, when I plug Pipsie=E2=80=99s =E2=80=9Cdoor=E2=80=9D to the mattress box she= becomes
nervous and right away looks for other opportunities to find new hiding places. To keep her happy and comfortable we let her into the mattress. The trouble starts at evening when she has to sleep=E2=80=A6 My wife Edith suggested letting her use the mattress box as a permanent home. I object to it because this will eliminate her enjoying the beautiful view she enjoys during the days as well as the bird visitors who come to the window.
Your advice re the carton and/or plywood seems great and this morning I will be on my way to =E2=80=9CHome Depot.=E2=80=9D No, Pipsie doesn=E2=80=99t really HAVE to sleep in her medium sized, always unlocked, cage. The cage is in our bedroom (she likes the company=E2=80=A6) and after she falls asleep we cover it with a heavy blanket because we watch TV. She is free flying in our condo (27th floor. Windows are secured professionally). It is a large building and although it is against our condo regulations, everybody loves her and we did not have any legal trouble since we have her, over 3 years. She enjoys when we take her on our way the garbage bin. She rides on our shoulders and heads, but will get off immediately when asked, she takes the =E2=80=9Cup= =E2=80=9D
command seriously.
Again, thank you so much Luis and Boyd, great help!!! I think Pipsie too will appreciate the change! Uri
Alex Clayton =D7=9B=D7=AA=D7=91:
Sorry, Should be Alex Clayton and Luis Boyd
Alex Clayton =D7=9B=D7=AA=D7=91:
My Sun Conure has a dish pan with the Saturday newspaper in it, under his cage.
He gets under the top sheet (I fold it up a little) then he digs a hole in the paper. He works very hard at it, usually finishing by Tuesday. He spends the rest of the week happily sitting in the hole he dug in the paper.
We start over every week with a fresh paper.
A busy beak is a happy beak.
My Sun Conure has a dish pan with the Saturday newspaper in it, under his cage. He gets under the ... dug in the paper. We start over every week with a fresh paper. A busy beak is a happy beak.

And a hole is an egg depository. If your sweetie is a hen and she lays, you'll want to change things.
The conures are so cute when it comes to dark, small, private places. Ours all have nest boxes for bedrooms and only lay during spring. If I take the box away, they are so, so, so unhappy. Fortunately they are not laying year-round which enables them to have their special hide-away.

Joanne
Show more