Hi,
Just after feeding my cornsnake tonight, I noticed a small, red mark right behind it's head. It looks almost like a scale has come off, but I'm not 100% sure that's what it is.
I took a picture, which you can find here :

I'm not sure if this is a serious problem, or something that will heal on its own...anyone have any ideas? Or is there anything I can do to help it along? (or should I see a vet?)
Thanks for any help!
Josh
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My first question would be..could a mouse have bitten him? Do you feed live or pre-killed?
Roger
Hi, Just after feeding my cornsnake tonight, I noticed a small, red mark right behind it's head. It looks almost ... there anything I can do to help it along? (or should I see a vet?) Thanks for any help! Josh

Looks like he scraped off a scale. I'd just keep a close eye on it to make sure it doesn't get infected. I've noticed with my snows and blizzard, they tend to get that a lot-perhaps something having to do with the lack of pigment also makes their scales easier to scrape and damage.

-cat
Hi, Just after feeding my cornsnake tonight, I noticed a small, red mark right behind it's head. It looks almost like a scale has come off, but I'm not 100% sure that's what it is.

Josh,
From the photo, that is what it looks like. To be safe, put some Neosporin or some other over-the-counter anti-bacterial ointment on it and keep an eye on it.
For the most part, reptile injuries to their skin/scales can take quite a while to heal, and with each progressive shed, it will start to look better.

If it should get any worse, or look like it is starting to spread, consider taking it in to a qualified reptilian vet.
Keep us updated.
~Wade
Hi, Just after feeding my cornsnake tonight, I noticed a small, red mark right behind it's head. It looks almost ... there anything I can do to help it along? (or should I see a vet?) Thanks for any help! Josh

Can't tell too much from the picture. I would suggest you apply Neosporin for a few days. Not sure what could have caused this, but it doesn't look serious!
Good Luck!
Jim Smith

Blaming the gun for murder, is like blaming the car for hit and run!
Thanks all for your replies! You've helped me become less worried about the little guy Emotion: smile
Yes, I've been feeding him live mice for about 6 months without incident. Without stemming a live vs. frozen debate, could this have been a wake up call to not feed live? (Or at least, to trim the mice's nails before dropping them in the tank...)
Also, a couple of you mentioned using Neosporin on him to help the healing process. Should I just lightly apply it right out of the tube, or do I need to dilute at all?
Thanks again for all of your help, I really appreciate it!

-Josh
Thanks all for your replies! You've helped me become less worried about the little guy Emotion: smile Yes, I've been feeding ... or do I need to dilute at all? Thanks again for all of your help, I really appreciate it! -Josh

Just use a q-tip and apply a small amount to the wound. Rub it in and use the q-tip to remove any excess.
DO NOT use the q-tip more than once. Each time you apply the Neosporin, use a new q-tip. Bacteria can be passed on to the tube and you can spread the bacteria! Don't use your finger as you can pass bacteria from you to the snake and vice versa.
Good Luck!
Jim Smith

Blaming the gun for murder, is like blaming the car for hit and run!
Hi, Just after feeding my cornsnake tonight, I noticed a ... should I see a vet?) Thanks for any help! Josh

It's not the mice nails that do the damage. I don't think a manicure will help. those 2 front teeth that do the damage. may caps for the teeth or F/T mice
a qualified reptilian vet.

I can't stand it anymore. I must nitpick!
reptile vet = vet experienced in treating reptiles reptilian vet = vet that has reptile-like characteristics

And don't think you're the only one that I've
seen doing this, you were just convenient.
Unless that's actually what you meant?
-Z
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