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Is that not why rabies vaccines are given to dogs?

Rabies vaccines are not 100% effective, and even if you've vaccinated your dog you'll still need boosters if he's exposed. And, BTW, around here, if your unvaccinated pet has a run-in with a rabid animal your pet will be impounded and destroyed - that's the law.
Not saying I want my dogs to be exposed to rabies, or a coyote for that matter, but I certainly ... coyote that lives in my area I feel that my dog is more than suited to take care of himself.

I tend to think that if we had a stupid-post-of-the-week award people might be more careful about making posts that could be considered competitive.

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Prouder than ever to be a member of the reality-based community
Rabies vaccines are not 100% effective, and even if you've vaccinated your dog you'll still need boosters if he's exposed.

And depending on the community, they may quarantine the animal anyway. Around here, it's 45 days. For the dog that came into contact with the wild critter, and any dogs that have come into contact with that dog after its exposure to the wild animal.
It happened about 4 months back to my friend (dog exposed to fox, not coyote). She was stuck in her tiny house with 5 dogs for 45 days. And since one of the dogs was a foster, he was unable to go to any adoption days or get adopted during that time.
Suja
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Is that not why rabies vaccines are given to dogs? Not saying I want my dogs to be exposed to rabies, or a coyote for that matter, but I certainly do not have to be paranoid that it could happen.

Rabies vax are not fool-proof.
I've lived in areas that were heavily populated by coyotes. Being a little paranoid about potential contact between coyotes and my animals struck me as not a bad thing.
If for some reason a coyote decided he was going to try and make a meal out of my dog, ... coyote that lives in my area I feel that my dog is more than suited to take care of himself.

A pack of coyotes can easily take out a full-grown white-tailed deer. How big is your dog?

Shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net (the Mother Ship)
http://esther.cat-sidh.net (Letters to Esther)
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well. Antoine de Saint-Exupery
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Which I am aware of, but they are solitary where I live.

Not necessarily true, according to Michigan DNR.

Shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net (the Mother Ship)
http://esther.cat-sidh.net (Letters to Esther)
O is for Olive run through with an awl.
Edward Gorey, The Gashlycrumb Tinies
Which I am aware of, but they are solitary where I live.

Not necessarily true, according to Michigan DNR. Shellyhttp://mysmelly.com#error Mother Ship)http://mysmelly.com#error to Esther) O is for Olive run through with an awl. Edward Gorey, The Gashlycrumb Tinies

I would be interested in seeing this myself, because I can't find information to say otherwise in Michigan.
Nick
I would be interested in seeing this myself, because I can't find information to say otherwise in Michigan.

Googling Michigan + DNR + coyotes produces the following as the first hit:

or
http://snipurl.com/1ig7f
The implication is that you can expect mated pairs plus offspring, which could mean groups of 2-9 individuals (I assume they mean 4-7 pups, not 47!). A single adult coyote can do damage to even a large-ish dog. Two adults, even more so. Add in potentially nearly adult sized pups, and, well, I* wouldn't want to make my dog an unnecessary target. And from my experience, if you live in a rural area with deer, larger groups are possible. *Much larger groups.
That said, I've had a single coyote fence fight with my two dogs, which were about 50 and 60 lbs. No damage done, but it could have ended badly.

Shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net (the Mother Ship)
http://esther.cat-sidh.net (Letters to Esther)
Defied I'm tongue tied when I try to explain
How I feel so foreign all blushed with emotion
And rough terminology laced up with language o lest you forget me Susan McKeown, Bones
But the point of the vaccine is to protect against an accidental encounter with an animal infected with rabies. Nothing is foolproof, but short of paper training my dog there isn't much I can do to guarantee he will never encounter a coyote. Personally, in my area there are far more viable targets for a coyote to attack than my dog. Coyotes are not stupid animals, as such I would estimate they would know there are easier targets. I feel it is pointless to take any more precautions than the ones I already do.

I am already out with him, if any canine, be it large dog or coyote wandered into my yard, the first thing I would do is call him into the house. But if a coyote entered my yard with the intention of attacking my dog, he would probably get to him faster than my dog would know what was going on, because of the layout of my yard. If that happened, I would leave my dog to handle it while I fetch a gun to take control of it myself. You can't install fences large enough to keep them out of your yard in my area do to ordinances.

My dog is always up to date on his vaccines, hopefully they would be effective. There are certain precautions that are worth taking, the rest of the time it is a matter of evaluating risk. In my situation, I feel it is better to not live in a plastic bubble with my dogs because they have a .1% chance of contracting rabies should we step outside it and happen to get attacked by a coyote.
If you ever take your dogs on walks in trails you have a better chance of them being attacked by a coyote then my dog does in my yard. The fact remains that I do not consider it enough of a risk to worry about it in my situation.
Nick
Nothing is foolproof, but short of paper training my dog there isn't much I can do to guarantee he will never encounter a coyote.

I'm confused. Is this about you or about the OP's question? Because I don't think anyone said you should do anything differently.

Shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net (the Mother Ship)
http://esther.cat-sidh.net (Letters to Esther)
G is for George smothered under a rug.
Edward Gorey, The Gashlycrumb Tinies
Nothing is foolproof, but short of paper training my dog there isn't much I can do to guarantee he will never encounter a coyote.

I'm confused. Is this about you or about the OP's question? Because I don't think anyone said you should do anything differently. Shellyhttp://mysmelly.com#error Mother Ship)http://mysmelly.com#error to Esther) G is for George smothered under a rug. Edward Gorey, The Gashlycrumb Tinies

The area near my home is not much brush, no animals as large as a deer, and lot's and lot's of squirrels, rabbits, and gophers. I think the Coyotes are more solitary.
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