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But the point of the vaccine is to protect against an accidental encounter with an animal infected with rabies. Nothing is foolproof, but short of paper training my dog there isn't much I can do to guarantee he will never encounter a coyote.

For those still reading, this is a fabulous example of lousy reasoning around risk. Better reasoning around risk weighs the likelihood of an event and the seriousness of an event on the one hand against the costs of mitigation on the other, and tries to find the right balance. In this case the fact that rabies vaccines aren't 100% effective shouldn't be taken as an excuse not to exercise reasonable caution about exposing your dog to rabies (the opposite, actually - jeeze).
Saying that you're not worried about coyotes because your dog is big ignores the range of threats posed by coyotes and fails to account for the fact that what's under discussion is whether or not to leave your dog outside unattended when you're not home, which frankly strikes me as a not particularly costly or effortful protection. This is not about guarantees.
And, incidentally, rabies causes neurological impairments. A rabid animal isn't going to be put off by the size of your dog.
If you ever take your dogs on walks in trails you have a better chance of them being attacked by a coyote then my dog does in my yard.

You just kinda make *** up, eh?

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Prouder than ever to be a member of the reality-based community
The implication is that you can expect mated pairs plus offspring, which could mean groups of 2-9 individuals (I assume ... And from my experience, if you live in a rural area with deer, larger groups are possible. Much larger groups.

And I'm not making him an unnecessary target. Short of locking him inside the house and never taking him out I can't alleviate any more risk of him being attacked. I am always out with him, and I can't legally install the size fence that would be needed to insure a coyote will not enter my yard. All I said was I am not worried about it. To worry about things you can do nothing more to prevent is pointless in my opinion. And if he were attacked by one, I think he could handle himself just fine. That in no way says I won't do everything I can to assist him.
Nick
Short of locking him inside the house and never taking him out I can't alleviate any more risk of him being attacked.

This isn't about you.

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Prouder than ever to be a member of the reality-based community
The area near my home is not much brush, no animals as large as a deer, and lot's and lot's of squirrels, rabbits, and gophers. I think the Coyotes are more solitary.

They may well be. Your local DNR folks would be the best source of information, I would think. In any event, since you know coyotes are active in your area, I wouldn't risk leaving my dog outdoors unattended, if it were me.

Shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net (the Mother Ship)
http://esther.cat-sidh.net (Letters to Esther)
Pancakes!
Dennis, Cabin Fever
@panix2.panix.com:
You just kinda make *** up, eh?

As far as I can remember, the only time I've encountered coyotes has been when I was driving and saw them along the road (usually dead) or while in my own home or yard. I've never actually encountered them in the woods, even though they were for absolutely certain heavily populated with coyotes.

Shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net (the Mother Ship)
http://esther.cat-sidh.net (Letters to Esther)
M is for Maud who was swept out to sea.
Edward Gorey, The Gashlycrumb Tinies
And, incidentally, rabies causes neurological impairments. A rabid animal isn't going to be put off by the size of your dog.

This is no minor point!

Lynne
"We are strong enough to stand tall tearlessly
We are brave enough to bend to cry
And sad enough to know
We must laugh again"
~ Nikki Giovanni, 4/17/2007, Virginia Tech
As far as I can remember, the only time I've encountered coyotes has been when I was driving and saw ... yard. I've never actually encountered them in the woods, even though they were for absolutely certain heavily populated with coyotes.

Yeah, that's typical. My only face-to-face (as it were) encounter with a coyote was in my barn. I figured it was likely rabid and I skedaddled. In the woods you see traces of them, and you certainly hear them at night, but I have yet to actually see one. One time I went out for a short ski out back and passed a recently-killed turkey on the trail. When I passed the same spot on my way home 10 or 15 minutes later it was gone.
However, I bought a copy of Cabela's "Alaskan Adventure" game because it included a mushing competition. The mushing bit turned out to be pretty boring, and in the hunting segments you were constantly being attacked by coyotes, wolves, elk, musk oxen, and all sorts of critters that maybe folks like what's-his-name think hide behind trees and then attack passers-by but actually don't. Between that and the heavy forests on the Seward Peninsula the game has some realism issues, although the dog butt looked a lot like the real thing. Maybe what's-his-name learned about the natural world from a Cabela's hunting game.

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Prouder than ever to be a member of the reality-based community
Yeah, that's typical. My only face-to-face (as it were) encounter with a coyote was in my barn. I figured it ... the trail. When I passed the same spot on my way home 10 or 15 minutes later it was gone.

I think I posted this here before, but WTH:

The coyote in Joshua Tree are unafraid of people, because the tourons feed them. This guy was within a few feet of me and was definitely confused when I chased him off, unfed, after shooting him (with my camera).
Other than there, my only other coyote encounters have been at night, when they have circled my campsites. I find their howling strangely comforting.
I did once have an encounter with a large, clearly rabid GSD mix when I was alone in the woods. I was on the bank of the Shenandoah River, and I immediately jumped in. Of course he didn't follow me into the water, but boy was he crazed. My hiking companions finally came back (since I was yelling for them) and scared him off with a shot gun. They weren't very good shots, which is a pity, because that dog was in the final stages of rabies, judging by his appearance and behavior.

Lynne
"We are strong enough to stand tall tearlessly
We are brave enough to bend to cry
And sad enough to know
We must laugh again"
~ Nikki Giovanni, 4/17/2007, Virginia Tech
Is that not why rabies vaccines are given to dogs? Not saying I want
my dogs to be exposed to rabies, or a coyote for that matter, but I certainly do not have to ... I am outside with my dogs at all times, so it wouldn't happen without me being aware of it. Nick

When my dog got into a fight with a bobcat my vet went over his shot records. Since he was up to date on everything he just gave a booster just to make sure and sent him home with no special instructions. We use the 3 year vaccinations here in Texas now and if the dog or cat has had the shot within the 12 month period after the first one they are protected for 3 years. The booster was just to make sure. If an animal is exposed to rabies and they are not sure of the dogs shot status here in Texas they will quarantine and administer rabies boosters and check blood titer. When the dogs titter is at a certain percent and they have passed the quarantine time they get to go home.
Being we live right on the border of Mexaco their would be allot of valuable animals killed if they had a destroy because of exposure to rabies rules. Dogs, cats, cattle, horses and people are exposed to it every year here. It's almost a
nonchalant attitude until they find a rabid bat in your neighborhood.
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