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P.S. Before I get flammed, Champ was several feet away from the opening of the lawn mower.

I'm pretty sure it's not your choice of profession that correlates most closely with your writing skills.

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Prouder than ever to be a member of the reality-based community
P.S. Before I get flammed, Champ was several feet away from the opening of the lawn mower. I wasn't letting ... him stick his nose in there. Unless you are perfectly clear in this group, people seem to assume the worse.

Unless you are talking about several feet and meaning 20 or 30 feet, you are placing your dog in an unsafe situation.

Marcel and Moogli
http://mudbunny.blogspot.com /
They always stay well away from any flying rocks to have any danger.

Wow! They can calculate where the rock will fly to, angles of projection and all of that? What talented dogs!

Janet B
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
P.S. Before I get flammed, Champ was several feet away from the opening of the lawn mower. I wasn't letting ... him stick his nose in there. Unless you are perfectly clear in this group, people seem to assume the worse.

BTW - your profession is no excuse for poor spelling.

Close enough. How far does a rock get thrown? At what angle does it project? You're putting your dogs in harms way. Period.

Janet B
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
in thread Janet B (Email Removed) whittled the following words:
They always stay well away from any flying rocks to have any danger.

Wow! They can calculate where the rock will fly to, angles of projection and all of that? What talented dogs!

A snotty remark. I expected no less. No, they usually sit on the porch and watch as I putter around the yard. Or they poke around on the other side of the yard. No where near the mower. They don't like the noise. Thank you for thinking the worst. As always.
I've never had a dog have an issue with a lawn mower.

well, it must be safe, then!
I just really don't think he's being a bad owner if it's not an issue.

like many things, it's not an issue until it becomes an issue.

shelly
http://home.bluemarble.net/~scouvrette
http://cat-sidh.blogspot.com /
http://letters-to-esther.blogspot.com / (updated 4/3/05)
A snotty remark. I expected no less.

you started the ***-flinging, so it really shouldn't surprise you that some of it was flung back at you.
No, they usually sit on the porch and watch as I putter around the yard. Or they poke around on the other side of the yard. No where near the mower. They don't like the noise. Thank you for thinking the worst. As always.

so, really, it's nothing like the OP's situation wherein at least one of his dogs is fascinated enough by the mower to fixate on the opening. hint: if the dog is close enough to be covered in grass, it's close enough to get seriously hurt or killed by flying debris.

shelly
http://home.bluemarble.net/~scouvrette
http://cat-sidh.blogspot.com /
http://letters-to-esther.blogspot.com / (updated 4/3/05)
in thread shelly (Email Removed) whittled the following words:

You have no idea how big his yard is, and how far away the dog stays from the mower. Yet you are so quick to judge. As always, thinking the worst and making it an issue. He apparently does not think it's an issue. Most dogs do not like mowers, so it's probably a safe bet the dogs stay as far as possible away that it's safe. You jump to conclusions, and always seem to try to form the worst opinion of someone possible.
like many things, it's not an issue until it becomes an issue.[/nq]I'd say it's an issue now, and the reason I'd say that has to do with how to think about risk. When telecom people do formal threat analyses they evaluate the likelihood of an attack occurring and they multiply it times the severity of the consequences of a successful attack. Obviously this kind of thing is overkill for domestic situations but still, it seems to me that a useful way to think about it is that it's not very likely that something would happen but if something does happen it's going to be serious (the dog's leg is amputated by the mower, a projectile is sent into the dog's skull or abdomen, etc.).

And then if you factor in the expected benefit from having your dog running around loose while you mow the lawn, which seems to me to hover somewhere right around zero, it becomes very difficult to understand why someone would tolerate the risk of something happening.
This security analysis moment was brought to you by the letter 'E.'

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Prouder than ever to be a member of the reality-based community
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