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(picture of Maui in the headboard)..

Too cute!!

Catherine
& Zoe the cockerchow
& Queenie the black gold retriever
& Max the Pomeranian
& Rosalie the calico
Not for how long during a workday, but how long for a dog's lifespan?

I plan on crating Tuck whenever NOT supervised (which isn't often.. he usually is with me) Until the day that ... She's getting senile and never will be trustworthy, so a crate is in her future until she crosses the bridge.

The case with my dog is similar, he is crated whenever I am not home. He sleeps outside the crate because he is extremely lazy and won't get up until noon if I don't make him. But if I am not around and he is awake, he will actively find something to destroy. He doesn't treasure hunt, but seems to enjoy things you wouldn't expect, such as tables. He has about every toy that exists that can hold up to his chewing yet if left on his own devices he will find all manner of things to chew on instead. So he will be crated forever so long as I'm not home.
Not for how long during a workday, but how long for a dog's lifespan? Curious how many choose to crate ... crate, not the dog choosing to hang out there) at some specific ages or maturity levels. Janet Boss www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com

Why do you ask Janet?
Lauralyn
Not for how long during a workday, but how long for a dog's lifespan? Curious how many choose to crate ... the dog in the crate, not the dog choosing to hang out there) at some specific ages or maturity levels.

I just thought I would throw in a few words based on my experience with Muttley, who is now sprawled on my bed snoring.
When I first got him, I had no real knowledge or experience about dogs, especially ones who have been recently rescued as strays. The first couple of nights were rough. I had put him inside a hastily assembled chain link 6' x 6' x 4' high kennel with additional fencing on top, but at night he managed to bend the bottom of the fencing and he got out, although he was still tethered to the frame. I had a doghouse for him as well, but he never seemed to want to go in it, even when the weather was cold and wet (February). He seemed OK about being tethered, so that's what I did, both inside and outside.
For several months, I gradually was able to trust him to have mostly free run in the house, but he often had "accidents" where he peed on the floor when I was not closely watching him. It was probably mostly his excitement about hearing, seeing, or smelling my cat.
In the last month or so, he seems to have matured a lot, and is less aggressive toward the cat, to the point where he will watch me feed and pet her on the porch without trying to tear down the screen door. Of course I make sure I give him attention when I come back in.

He has chewed on some things that he should not have, such as some computer cables, but he seems to understand that I am not pleased. I have since given him more suitable chews, such as rawhide, which he carefully shreds and completely devours. Now he has a nylon "bone".

I have been able to leave him in the house, with essentially free run and all sorts of possible temptations, for as long as 8 or 10 hours, and he has not caused any mischief. He informs me when he wants to go out, and he has been good about doing his business when I walk him, although he will also do it when I let him out back on his tether for a while. He usually just sleeps on the steps until I let him in.
I am probably fortunate to have a dog who is apparently smart enough, and sufficiently motivated to please, that he can be trusted on his own in the house, and also possibly learning to accept the cat to some small extent. This is especially amazing after probably quite a long time of running wild on the street.
He still needs more training, and I will find out tonight how he behaves in the company of other dogs in his first obedience class. He (and I) have been doing homework with some success. It has been a long hard journey, especially the first 4 or 5 months, but maybe my patience (and some instruction) is now paying off. It will be a lot harder now for me to give him up, but I think it will still be for the best. However, I will insist on a very special home for him, however long it may take.

Paul
Why do you ask Janet?

to annoy YOU! HTH!
Stalkers are weird..

Janet Boss
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
He (and I) have been doing homework with some success. It has been a long hard journey, especially the first ... be for the best. However, I will insist on a very special home for him, however long it may take.

As you know Paul I wish him (and you) only the best outcome. The first night with dogs can seem a little hectic (but often is not), so think calm thoughts! ;-D

Janet Boss
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
Not for how long during a workday, but how long for a dog's lifespan? Curious how many choose to crate ... the dog in the crate, not the dog choosing to hang out there) at some specific ages or maturity levels.

Moogli gets crated every night when I go to bed. He is simply not trustworthy to leave out. He pulls the eyes off of teddy bears and pulls out/eats the stuffing. He never does it when we are awake, only when we are asleep. His crate is at the foot of our bed.
In addition, Emilie is now sleeping in a bed, not in her crib (1), and we don't want him going in her room at night and waking her up by jumping on her.
During the day when Gen and I are at work, Moogli also gets crated. He enjoys barking far too much for us to allow him to be free. We do leave him in our bedroom (where his crate is) with the door closed, but the crate opened.
On the weekend, if we go out for a couple of hours, we will leave him free, but any longer and he gets crated/shut in the bedroom.

(1) I know she is growing up and all, but emotionally, I am not ready for it. She turned 18 months old on Monday! She's not wsupposed to be growing old this fast.

Marcel and Moogli
http://mudbunny.blogspot.com /
in thread Marcel Beaudoin (Email Removed) whittled the following words:
Moogli gets crated every night when I go to bed. He is simply not trustworthy to leave out. He pulls the eyes off of teddy bears and pulls out/eats the stuffing. He never does it when we are awake, only when we are asleep.

Moogli, the Teddy Bear Slasher! Who woulda thunk it?
(1) I know she is growing up and all, but emotionally, I am not ready for it. She turned 18 months old on Monday! She's not wsupposed to be growing old this fast.

I can just see you when her first suitor comes to the door. LOL
Thanks for all of the answers. I don't agree or disagree with all of you (and I'm sure it's vice versa), but I think the general consensus is not to crate when you're gone by default, but until the dog doesn't act destructively any longer (which I realize the age of which may vary greatly).
My goal will always be to wean from the crate when I'm gone, as early as reasonable, and the nighttime crate much earlier. I have multiple dogs for myself, but also as companions for each other, so crating one in another room while the others sleep on my bed, wouldn't be something that I think of as reasonable. If I needed to crate one for some reason, I'd wedge a crate into my bedroom somehow (assuming the other dog(s) slept in the bedroom as well).
While not being home means there can be no supervision, I can't fathom sleeping so deeply that I wouldn't be aware of a problem during the night, and I can't imagine dogs with so little respect that they'd wait until I was sleeping to destroy the house (and why aren't they tired at the end of the day?!?!?).
Basically, ****O, I would feel that if I had to crate an adult, healthy dog, for the dog's entire life, but particularly overnight, that I had failed in my training somehow. A tired dog is a good dog.. or at least most of the time ;-D

Janet Boss
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
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