http://www.agilityability.com/anneka dahle.htm
Anneka is a successful agility competitor- at age THREE. No kidding.
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http://www.agilityability.com/anneka dahle.htm Anneka is a successful agility competitor- at age THREE. No kidding.

Well sure, but she's doing it with an Aussie and a Sheltie. Those dogs can read the course diagram and learn it ahead of time!

Really, this is SO cool! She is adorable!
And just the thought of her doing this at age 3 makes me feel like a real slacker!
I am definitely showing this to DH. We're going to be in Florida this winter and he's hesitant about whether or not Sassy (read: DH) is ready to do a trial while we're there. We'll see just how competitive THIS makes him feel!
~~Judy
And just the thought of her doing this at age 3 makes me feel like a real slacker!

You need to look at it like I do: it just means that agility is like skiing, dancing and foreign languages, easier to learn and master if you start at a young age.
Beth
http://www.agilityability.com/anneka dahle.htm Anneka is a successful agility competitor- at age THREE. No kidding. \

She is also absolutely adorable.
Aww. She is too cute!

Kristen and
Kali CDX, CGC, TDIA, TT
www.kristenandkali.com
http://www.agilityability.com/anneka dahle.htm Anneka is a successful agility competitor- at age THREE. No kidding.

I initially only read the post, didn't click on the link. Wondered what the big deal was about a 3 year old DOG who is a successful agility competitor. Darn, that kid sure is cute. At that age, how could she possibly keep track of how the course is laid out?

Suja
Darn, that kid sure is cute. At that age, how could she possibly keep track of how the course is laid out?

At the beginning levels, course layout is usually fairly simple.
Really, this is SO cool! She is adorable!

Isn't she though?
And just the thought of her doing this at age 3 makes me feel like a real slacker!

Heh. As Beth said, I think it may be a matter of it coming more easily when you start young. Also, you have to remember that she IS running other people's already trained dogs!
I am definitely showing this to DH. We're going to be in Florida this winter and he's hesitant about whether or not Sassy (read: DH) is ready to do a trial while we're there.

You know what? Tell him to think of it as expensive practice. Seriously! If you take the attitude that your first couple of trials are exactly that- practice for both you and the dog to learn about real trialing- it takes the pressure off; which means you're actually more likely to do well AND to not mess up your dog or yourself if things go wrong.
My agility instructor once told an entire beginning class that they could enter our club's trial *if* they promised to deliberately NQ themselves; IOW she wanted them to get trial experience, but not get hung up on trying to Q. (She exempted a few of us who'd competed with previous dogs, and whom she knew wouldn't push ourselves or our young dogs.)
My agility instructor once told an entire beginning class that they could enter our club's trial *if* they promised to deliberately NQ themselves; IOW she wanted them to get trial experience, but not get hung up on trying to Q.

Hah! I've never heard of such a thing - it's usually not a problem to not get a Q. But I guess that your intructor's point was that, if they knew they weren't going to Q, they'd be more relaxed.
BTW: did anyone ever run clean and then purposely knock the last bar?

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
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