For the first time, I got to meet and spend a couple of hours with a deaf dog yesterday. He is a 17 month old Dogo, and all puppy. All the Dogos I had seen previously were much larger than him, so I assumed that he was a very young puppy.
Anyway, a nicer dog, I've never seen. Appears to be pure energy on four legs, played wonderfully with an itty bitty BC puppy (had blood on his face from the needle teeth), and did a nice round of smackdown with Khan. Gave me the nicest, sloppy little kisses too.

Quite honestly, if the owner hadn't told me that he was deaf, I wouldn't have known. There was nothing 'off' about his body language WRT dogs or people. Is that normal? I assumed that not being able to hear would put a dog at a disadvantage when it comes to interactions, but that doesn't appear to be the case, at least with Diego.

Suja
For the first time, I got to meet and spend a couple of hours with a deaf dog yesterday. He ... at a disadvantage when it comes to interactions, but that doesn't appear to be the case, at least with Diego.

Its normal for people to not be able to tell a dog is deaf because there's no overt signals or body language that goes along with being a deafie wrt to people. As for dog interactions, what you describe is normal in a deafie who was well-socialized with other dogs & possibly lives with another dog or cat. Its abnormal for deaf dogs who only see other dogs occasionally. The reason being that they've never learned to read another dog's body language. Obviously noises & growls are lost on them and they didn't benefit from in-litter associations because puppies yelp and deafies don't hear it. Learning to read body language is really important for the deaf dog. They tend to be wide-open and bullyish when in a social situation which is what lands them in trouble.

Tara
Poor, ol' deaf Meadow
gets along with other dogs, but I've been remiss in training her to give attention to people. Got to get to work on that. She's only gotten into trouble once when she was determined to play with my Maltese. She gave him a play bow and, when he didn't respond, she planted a big foot on him. Pip growled, which she didn't hear, but Mac did. He body-slammed her and knocked her down. Poor girl was very confused; "What'd I do?"
For the first time, I got to meet and spend a couple of hours with a deaf dog yesterday. He ... a disadvantage when it comes to interactions, but that doesn't appear to be the case, at least with Diego. Suja

I don't know if it makes a difference but dogs are sensitive to vibrations through the pads of their feet so can feel noise. Also, dogs can see and feel other dogs whine and growl . I can't hear Dibby whining (thank doG) unless I wear my hearing aid but I can see his chest moving so I know he's whining. Sometimes I think* I can hear my cat purring when I stroke her but it's not until I put my ear closer to her body that I can actually hear her and not *hear the vibrations. It a bit hard to explain but sometimes hearing something and feeling something become the same thing , just as tasting and smelling are virtually the same to a cat. Alison