Our cat Sam (large, neutered male, about 7 years of age) has recently been diagnosed with diabetes.
However, we're having trouble getting him stabilised. Already he's on 12 units of PZI a day, which apparently is extremely high.

Does anbody else have a cat on such a high dose? Is it that unusual?

Regards
Stephen Ward
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Our cat Sam (large, neutered male, about 7 years of age) has recently been diagnosed with diabetes. However, we're having ... extremely high. Does anbody else have a cat on such a high dose? Is it that unusual? Regards Stephen Ward

How does a cat end up being diabetic? Please describe the old diet vs. the new (assuming) diabetic diet. Thank you.

~~Philip "Never let school interfere with your education - Mark Twain"
Our cat Sam (large, neutered male, about 7 years of age) has recently been diagnosed with diabetes. However, we're having trouble getting him stabilised. Already he's on 12 units of PZI a day, which apparently is extremely high.

That does seem rather high to me, but not unheard of. (Disclaimer: I'm not a vet at all, but since I have a diabetic cat who has also proved very difficult to regulate, I've read a lot about it and learned even more by experience). How much does Sam weigh? And what's his diet like?
Kelson, my 25+ lb Maine Coon, gets 8.5 units of PZI TWICE a day, which is just about right, although he still goes through periods of instability and I'd call him only 'lightly' regulated, but it's the best we can do after two years of trying different diets and insulin types. And he's actually doing better than I make that sound: all his blood tests have come back normal, and there doesn't seem to be any damage to his internal systems, and he's drinking and urinating the normal amount these days.
Are you giving the shots twice a day, or once a day? Kelson seems to metabolize (or whatever) the insulin very quickly, so we've found he needs the twice a day shots. When we tried the L (Lente) insulin, which is shorter-acting, he even needed shots three times a day, but apparently that is very unusual.
With Sam, I can't help but wonder if you're seeing rebound (Somoygi, sp?) with a 12-unit dose. Have you done a 12 or 24 hour curve where you've tested him every 3 hours? I've found that Kelson can drop up to
100 points (mg/dl) per hour, so in three hours he could, conceivablydrop from 300 to a dangerous level and start to rebound. (And I have, on occasion, seen him rise 100 points in only half an hour.) Do you have a home tester for blood glucose? If not, I wholeheartedly recommend getting one, they're only about $40 and they've proved invaluable to regulating Kelson.
I'd be happy to talk more via email, but I'd also recommend that you check out the two webpages where you can join forums and read up on diabetes in animals:
http://www.felinediabetes.com
http://www.petdiabetes.com
Both have lots of information and ways to talk to other owners of diabetic cats and dogs.
Good luck!
- Nancy.
Our cat Sam (large, neutered male, about 7 years of age) has recently been diagnosed with diabetes. However, we're having ... extremely high. Does anbody else have a cat on such a high dose? Is it that unusual? Regards Stephen Ward

Try giving him a zero carb diet. There are many brands of canned cat food with zero carbs or a homemade diets consisting of only varied meats. BTW, cats with type II diabetes (more common) do not respond to insulin. Diet is the only way to go.
Our cat Sam (large, neutered male, about 7 years of age) has recently been diagnosed with diabetes. However, we're having ... which apparently is extremely high. Does anbody else have a cat on such a high dose? Is it that unusual?

12 units/day is a very high dosage and presents a risk for reboundhyperglycemia if there's any deviation in the cat's caloric intake.

How was your cat diagnosed? Did your vet order a serum fructosamine or glycosylatated hemoglobin test to distinguish pathological hyperglycemia from physiological (stress) hyperglycemia, and a urinalysis for glycosuria (sugar in the urine)? Stress can drive a cat's BG to >300 or >400 mg/dl.

Think about it: From the time the cat is put in a carrier, then put in the car (cats generally don't like the unsettling movement), then at the vet's office where he's inundated with hundreds of scents from past and present animals and barking dogs, then placed on a cold exam table and palpitated from head to tail, then a thermometer is inserted into his rectum, then he's restrained while a needle pierces his neck or leg - about an hour passes and the cat undergoes enough stress for his defensive mechanisms to kick in and for physiologic hyperglycemia to develop.
Many of our cats that were hyperglycemic at the vet's office were normal after a few hours back at the shelter. Are you monitoring your cat's BG at home? This is very important - especially with such a high dose.
How was the dosage calculated? Did your vet perform a glucose curve? A glucose cure helps determine the dose based on the rate your cat metabolizes the insulin with the cat's diet However, the same* food, in the *same* quantities, and fed at the *same times must be followed during the test as when the cat eats at home. This can be difficult without contributing significant stress since most cat won't eat at the clinic and must be force-fed.
Is your cat overweight or obese? Has he been checked for possible occult infections. Glycosuria is breeding ground for bacteria and infection.

One last suggestion: Do not change your cat's diet without consulting your vet! A drop in caloric intake or carbohydrate intake can result in an insulin overdose if the dosage isn't adjusted,. and activation of the Somogyi Phenomenon.
You might want to go to http://www.acvim.org/Kittleson/search.htm and do a search for an internal medicine Diplomate/Specialist in your area. American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine Diplomates are about the best there is.
If you can't find an ACVIM specialist in your area, my second choice would be an ABVP Diplomate/Feline Specialist (American Board of Veterinary Practitioners).
Go to http://www.abvp.com/diplosearch1.htm http://www.abvp.com /
Good luck.
Phil
Our cat Sam (large, neutered male, about 7 years of ... a high dose? Is it that unusual? Regards Stephen Ward

Try giving him a zero carb diet.

Still trying to kill cats with your asinine and dangerous advice? The cat's diet should not be changed without consulting a vet - A reduction in calories or carbohydrates without a dosage adjustment can result in an insulin overdose.
Why don't you get the hell out of here because your asinine and dangerous advice kill someone's cat - if it hasn't already!
Our cat Sam (large, neutered male, about 7 years of age) has recently been diagnosed with diabetes. However, we're having ... which apparently is extremely high. Does anbody else have a cat on such a high dose? Is it that unusual?

Hi Stephen,
If you haven't already, you might want to visit www.felinediabetes.com and www.petdiabetes.org. On the latter site, you can join a mailing list made up of owners of diabetic pets. I belonged to this list for a couple of years when I was caring for a diabetic cat and found it very helpful. My cat wasn't on PZI so I can't answer your question, but I'm sure if you posed the question to the list, you'll hear from a lot of people whose cats are on PZI and you'll also get tons of advice and suggestions for this trying period when you are trying to figure out the best insulin and dose for your cat. You can also read through the archives on the site. Select PetDiabetes Mailing list from the resources for information and support section.
If your cat is having problems getting stabilized, you might want to try changing the type of insulin being used. There are several different types, and cats respond to each one differently. Also note that the insulin shots have to be given exactly on time. If your cat is only having one shot a day, you might want to do two shots instead - most cats do better with two shots a day. As usual, no changes should be made to what you are doing without first discussing them with your vet.
Good luck.
If you haven't already, you might want to visit www.felinediabetes.com and www.petdiabetes.org. On the latter site, you can join a ... this list for a couple of years when I was caring for a diabetic cat and found it very helpful.

Oops, the mailing list I belonged to is at www.petdiabetes.com, but the one at petdiabetes.org looks helpful as well...
What kind of food has you cat been given the past 7 years?
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