1 2 3 4
how would she know she female if you never let her grow up with all her parts?

Are you under the impression that a male's sex organ is removed during a neuter? That's the only explanation I can think of to explain your question.

Tara
that's what we've done. she's only done it twice, but both times right in front of me, and both times a loud "NO" stopped her mid-stream. hopefully that's all it will take.

I would think so. I've got an intact male and we have only had a problem with him marking once. And it was because someone else's intact male marked. It was a crate in the house. Guest dog marked it, Shane felt compelled to re-mark it. I caught him after a drop or two. That was that.

The dog probably doesn't see marking as being the same as peeing, so you're training out a different behavior even if the method is the same. Better she does it in front of you than on the sly.

-Andrea Stone
Saorsa Basenjis
http://home1.gte.net/res0s12z/
The Trolls Nest - greenmen, goblins & gargoyle wall art www.trollsnest.com
Not a terribly well-thought-out plan is to bellow "NO!" when appropriate (e.g., catching the dog in the act of marking). It works, though. At least, it worked for Duke, who simply didn't know any better. He quickly learned that leg-hiking indoors isn't appreciated around here.

What does one do if this doesn't work? I've caught my Shih Tzu in the act numerous times, bellowed NO! Outside! (our word for going out to pee) and he just looks at me puzzled, as if to say "Gee, what did I do? Why are you yelling at me?" He is really good about peeing when taken outside, but apparently just doesn't get that outside is the ONLY place he can go. He's a wonderful little dog, except that his habit of peeing and pooping in the house is driving me nuts and ruining my carpet.
Joy
What does one do if this doesn't work? I've caught my Shih Tzu in the act numerous times, bellowed NO! ... just looks at me puzzled, as if to say "Gee, what did I do? Why are you yelling at me?"

If you're yelling "outside", by which you mean "GO outside and pee", but the dog is hearing "outside", which has always meant "your ARE outside, so pee already" is it any wonder he seems a bit confused? He is, after all, doing what you're telling him to do. That he's doing it in a place that's inappropriate, well, how's he supposed to know that?

What we think we're teaching our dogs isn't always what our dogs learn from us, you know.
My inclination (and it's pretty much pure instinct and not a carefully considered training technique) is to yell "NO!", grab dog up and carry it outside. Usually leaving a little yellow trail. But it's swift and sure and just uncomfortable enough for the dog to make 'em want to avoid it happening again. Duke quit when I yelled, so I didn't have to move him. Good thing, too, 'cause he's a 75-80 lb dog and not so easy to bench press.
The unexpected airlift to the Great Outdoors worked with Katie, though.

Praise and rewards for appropriately-sited elimination is important. Vigilance is also important. Enzymatic cleaners are important. But some dogs need just a bit more in the "make the wrong thing hard" department.

Mary H. and the Ames National Zoo: Regis, Sam-I-Am, Noah (1992-2001), Ranger, Duke,
felines, and finches
What does one do if this doesn't work? I've caught ... what did I do? Why are you yelling at me?"

If you're yelling "outside", by which you mean "GO outside and pee", but the dog is hearing "outside", which has always meant "your ARE outside, so pee already" is it any wonder he seems a bit confused?

Not exactly, "outside" is what we always say to initiate the act of going outside. If we are in the house and I say "outside" he'll trot over to get his leash put on, and we'll go outside and he'll pee.

He is,
after all, doing what you're telling him to do. That he's doing it in a place that's inappropriate, well, how's ... considered training technique) is to yell "NO!", grab dog up and carry it outside. Usually leaving a little yellow trail.

I've done that a number of times. He just doesn't seem to get it. He's a really, really sweet loving dog, but not the sharpest tack in the box. Is it possible for a dog to be just too "underbright" to understand this?

He will wake me first thing in the morning announcing that he has to go, but that is the only time of day he will do this. I'm trying to teach him to scratch at the door when he goes out, but while he doesn't mind scratching at the door he clearly has no idea what the point is - and I just can't figure out how to get it across.
But it's swift and
sure and just uncomfortable enough for the dog to make 'em want to avoid it happening again. Duke quit when I yelled, so I didn't have to move him. Good thing, too, 'cause he's a 75-80 lb dog and not so easy to bench press.

Well, mine is a whole 10 pounds or so - at least he's easier to airlift..
The unexpected airlift to the Great Outdoors worked with Katie, though. Praise and rewards for appropriately-sited elimination is important. Vigilance is also important. Enzymatic cleaners are important. But some dogs need just a bit more in the "make the wrong thing hard" department.

Right now, enzymatic cleaners are the only thing making my house fit to live in..vigilance is a problem, because I'm gone for about 9 hours a day, and I work too far away to come home at lunch and walk the dog. On the other hand, it seems like he pees in the floor just as much in the evening when we're home as he does during the day.
Thanks for your post - I'm just going to have to do more in the "make the wrong thing hard" dept - he is already restricted to only certain parts of the house, maybe restricting him very strongly to only the kitchen (no carpet) for a while would help. Unfortunately, when I tried closing off the kitchen door before he chewed up the door jamb.
Thanks for your post - I'm just going to have to do more in the "make the wrong thing hard" ... a while would help. Unfortunately, when I tried closing off the kitchen door before he chewed up the door jamb.

I am wondering if you need to take the opposite approach to this:

Do you do anything with the dog in all of the rooms of the house? I ask because we had a problem where Moogli would go to one specific room to go to the bathroom while we were house-training him. After a bit of thinking, we realized that we never did anything with him in that room, so he never really saw it as part of his den. All it took was about a week of playing 20-30 minutes a night with him in that room and he started seeing that room as part of his den.

**
Marcel Beaudoin & Moogli
**
'iT's HARd to tYpe wHiLE holdINf a dog!'
**
Thanks for your post - I'm just going to have ... the kitchen door before he chewed up the door jamb.

I am wondering if you need to take the opposite approach to this: Do you do anything with the dog ... 20-30 minutes a night with him in that room and he started seeing that room as part of his den.[/nq]I don't think that is the problem - he is just as likely to pee in one of the rooms we use most as in one of the rooms we use least. Actually, this problem stems from puppyhood - he was never very well trained. Part of the problem seemed to be because he didn't (and still doesn't) seem to have any objection to fouling his "den". As a very young puppy he was confined to a particular room of the house, in which I had placed the disposable pee pads.

I was under the impression that dogs didn't like to pee where they laid down - so I thought I was in real trouble when I noticed that he would occasionally just lay down in a puddle of pee. It just didn't disturb him (apparently nothing grosses this dog out). On the other hand, he does sleep with me every night - and has never peed in my bed..
It's quite common in females. My female, Murphy, used to mark as well as midden.
Fly lifts a leg to cover other dogs' marks. Then Solo comes over and marks over Fly. Und so weiter.

Melanie Lee Chang > Form ever follows function. Departments of Anthropology and Biology >
University of Pennsylvania > Louis Sullivan (Email Removed) >
Fly lifts a leg to cover other dogs' marks. Then Solo comes over and marks over Fly. Und so weiter.

I've never seen my dogs mark one another's mark, let alone do the weiter thang.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
Show more