Right now, Maui and Cali are in love. They can't get enough of each other. When I am holding Cali, Maui cries for me to put her down (95% of the time when I hold just her, Maui cries till I put her down at which point he plays with her). When Maui isn't playing with her, Cali will sometimes bark at him and try to get him to play a game with her (she'll do this 50% or so of the time, otherwise she'll entertain herself if I am not available for play either).

I separate them sometimes so I get the chance to have individual time with them. Neither seem to mind too much so that is ok so far. My questions are..since I never had 2 dogs..will they continue to get along so well or will the facination with each other fade? Is there a chance that they will get bored with each other and start fighting? They seem pretty bonded now and I would love to keep it that way. What kind of things can be done to keep reinforcing this good bond? What kind of things could screw it up? Thanks for any insight into this new territory for me.
1 2 3
Right now, Maui and Cali are in love. They can't get enough of each other. When I am holding Cali, ... good bond? What kind of things could screw it up? Thanks for any insight into this new territory for me.

I think dogs tend to love each other forever. I've never had it stop, only for the bond to become stronger. I always treat them as individuals and have some "only" time with each one of them, but one reason I have more than one is for companionship for each other.

Janet B
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
I think dogs tend to love each other forever. I've never had it stop, only for the bond to become ... time with each one of them, but one reason I have more than one is for companionship for each other.

I found that dogs do form actual friendships with other dogs. I have also found that most dogs recognize their own breed and have a different sort of relationship right from the start than with other dogs. There was that boxer who fell in love with one of our beagles so anything can happen. But let our schnauzers catch sight of another schnauzer - any size - and it's a different reaction than for other breeds. They have to get to see each other.
On that note, however, I know of a doberman who believes that she is a schnauzer. She was born c-section and a singleton. Our schnauzer breeder had also just had a singleton born. The doberman was put in with the schnauzer mother and raised for ten (?) weeks with the entire schnauzer pack. (Heck, they all speak german, right?) Then she went back to live in her doberman home. I asked her owner which breed gets that "familiar" reaction from her (now full-grown) and she said it's still the schnauzers. She admits her doberman thinks she's a schnauzer. Probably doesn't help that she then added a schnauzer to her household. Now they're probably all confused.
Our dogs also generalize about other breeds. They think all goldens are their cousin Cobi, all boxers are Phineas and all border collies are Muttin. And Spenser thinks that all poodles are that one that attacked him two years ago.
~~Judy
I think dogs tend to love each other forever. I've never had it stop, only for the bond to become ... time with each one of them, but one reason I have more than one is for companionship for each other.

I agree...my two boys, even though they have moments of upset, get along very well 99% of the time.
That rare 1% is when one of the two just wants to be left alone. Now with the puppy, it works out well, if one dog wants to be left alone, the puppy can play with the other.
Bodhi remembers his "friends" he's made when he was younger. There are a couple of friends of mine that have intact males of similar age to Bodhi, they still seem to remmber each other & romp & play when they come in contact.
Shelly w/ Coda & The Black Pack
having introduced nearly 500 dogs into an established household (we run a rescue) over the past ten years...here is my opinion... First, it sounds like you have two good natured dogs. For a dog, play is as much educational as it is fun. People tend to view dogs in a human context. They think that play is just that, dogs having fun...and fun is a part of it, but you need to watch with a more clinical eye as well. Play time (with recently introduced dogs) is a dogs way of learning each others limitations and expectations.

You could say it is almost like sparring or play fighting. The dogs wrestle and romp about trying to learn each other. For good natured dogs it is kind of a..."will she let me bite her ear? how about the leg? can I tackle her?" It is a touchy feely way for the dogs to learn what the other will allow and not allow. Play time can escallate into fight time and often does, so you need to be prepared for that eventuality and should supervise thier play time closely.

Your dogs have triggers that will send them into a tussle. For my own female it is her tail. She will play and romp with anyone, but god forbid they nip her tail...any dog who who nips the tail gets a beat down, plain and simple. The only way you can learn to know what triggers an aggressive response during play is to watch and learn. You will likely have a tussle or two...but do not get upset, stay calm and in control. The dogs and you will both learn a great deal from a good tussle! You will learn at what point whichever dog has had enough...and they will learn the same.

In the future when you see the play moving into the danger zone you can split it up before a tussle begins. (so supervision is key is what I am saying). 90% of the time the dogs will have their little scuffle and that is that, but you need to treat every scuffle as though it could turn into a full blown fight (for your dogs safety). We keep a super soaker squirt gun handy...when a scuffle goes on just a bit too long...we soak em!...to get them out of "the zone".

Some people use whistles, air horns, blankets, whatever is an attention grabber. (we use water cause Beagles do not typically think water is anything they should ever have on them.) The "distance distraction" method is usually the best method and the safest. Many times you will actually cause a scuffle to become a fight by interferring physically with the dogs. (not to mention risk to your person). If you can stand across the room or near them and have some way to break their concentration on each other and the scuffle by making them go..."What the HELL was THAT?" ...you will split the attention long enough to seperate them as well as have them thinking you have some secret magic.
I personally feel that your interference in the bonding process can only complicate things. I feel most failed dog to dog relationships are the fault of their people rather than the dogs. No one communicates better with a dog than another dog. If you had two dogs that just could not get along I would say differently, but yours seem to be doing just fine on their own. Let the dogs work things out on their own without your interference. They will come to a much more lasting understanding if they are allowed to have that understanding be their own, rather than an understanding predicated on mom.

As an example, we have a pair of Beagles that so long as Dad is home they sleep together, play together, even eat from the same bowl...but when Dad is out of town for work...they fight contantly and thier mom has been bit more than once trying to split them up...Why? Dad interferred too much and was in too tight of control of their understanding of each other...so now when dad is not there they do not know what to do. This is an extreme example, but my point is is that it is possible to interfere too much.

It will be better that they bond naturally rather than you try to make them bond well if they do not want to. As an example..my oldest and youngest female are...indifferent to each other. We wanted them to be close, but they are not...but they are comfortable with that, they understand each other and go about their business accordingly. If we tried to push their relationship we would likely have introduced on thing...stress...and stress causes problems.

Will the facination fade?
Yes...once the learning curve has played out. Right now everything is new and interesting, like a new boyfreind, or how you felt about your hubby when you were dating...and then sooner or later you go from not wanting to wait to see him again to...could you go sleep on the couch, I cannot sleep with all that snoring!
Will the facination fade? Yes...once the learning curve has played out.

I really don't think it's possible to say "yes" or "no." It depends on the dogs and how they bond, and much depends on what happens when the younger one hits adolescence.

BTW, originally Latin was written with no spaces delineating the ends and beginnings of words. Spaces were introduced to improve readability, and so it goes with paragraphs. And not only do paragraphs improve readability, they also tend to encourage the writer to structure his/her thoughts. We like paragraphs!

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Hollywood was so out of touch with what seemed like reality that it was, in fact, entirely in touch with the new political ethos in Washington Matt Bai
I think dogs tend to love each other forever. I've ... have more than one is for companionship for each other.

I found that dogs do form actual friendships with other dogs. I have also found that most dogs recognize their ... all border collies are Muttin. And Spenser thinks that all poodles are that one that attacked him two years ago.

They also apparently have crushes, too. Scully, female BC, age 5, has two admirers on teams from opposite ends of the region. She knows these dogs only from flyball tournaments, her contact with them has been brief - a few minutes at a time every few months - and strictly supervised. Both are male BCs, unneutered. She was spayed around age 2.5 yrs and is healthy. No chance of her being in season or harboring some sort of lurking infection. And these guys find her fascinating. She afflicts them with a major case of the tuckbutt zoomies, and there is much silliness and gamboling around.
With one of the dogs, she reciprocates in full. She is less enthusiastic about the other. She tolerates him but when he tries the "let me duck me head and tuck my neck under your chin" maneuver (which she allows from the other guy), she barks her outrage and drives him off. He is, apparently, the lesser bobka. The owners of both males are as flummoxed by their behavior as we are.
I'm just amazed that they single each other out, of the dozens of similar encounters, for such intense interaction. Most of the time a polite sniff is the only acknowledgement that there is another dog very close by.
Kathleen
I think dogs tend to love each other forever. I've ... have more than one is for companionship for each other.

I found that dogs do form actual friendships with other dogs. I have also found that most dogs recognize their ... all border collies are Muttin. And Spenser thinks that all poodles are that one that attacked him two years ago.

that all sounds great, thanks for sharing!
I really don't think it's possible to say "yes" or "no." It depends on the dogs and how they bond, and much depends on what happens when the younger one hits adolescence.

Yep. And it can work in reverse, as well- my two females are 7.5 and 4.5, and actually play together more than they did when the JRT was a puppy. She's now old enough not to be just the pesty puppy, basically.
Show more