1 2 3 4 5 6 7
She doesn't? That's a big red flag right there.

Why? There are plenty of good rescue groups that don't do "trial runs", feeling that they can tend to encourage people not to commit.

For me, if they're not willing to openly allow for the fact that there is often a "chemistry" thing (not to mention practical issues) that can come up during the few weeks after an adoption, then its not a group I would want to work with.
Adoption groups are definitely free to have whatever policies they want, but I wouldn't choose to work with them. I see far too many people who adopt an animal get promptly and effectively dumped by the rescue group they "worked with" as soon as the leash is handed over. And if problems arise, they don't feel they can use the group as a resource to help solve the problem or to help **** the problem in any way. While that's not saying every group that doesn't have trial periods is like this, I do think that offering a trial period gives at least the appearance of staying involved after the dog has been transported to its new home.
So yeah, for me, that would be a big red flag that would cause me to rethink whether or not I adopt a dog from them. Though from this thread, I certainly see how there can be many interpretations of this aspect of a contract.

Tara
For me, if they're not willing to openly allow for the fact that there is often a "chemistry" thing (not ... them. Though from this thread, I certainly see how there can be many interpretations of this aspect of a contract.

one of the non-breed specific rescues I talked to here doesn't have trial periods, per se, but they do allow you to return the animal and get your adoption fee refunded with the caveat that you have to keep him or her until they either adopt the animal out or find another foster home.

Lynne
Lynne,
I haven't had the luxury of choosing a dog since I had Dobes back in the day..My rescue dogs came to me. Pleeze tell your daughter that I have Lady who is now 14, arrived at age 1.
Buck who is now 13 arrived at age 1
Jubal Early who is 2and 1/2 arrived at age1
Jack who is 2 and 1/2 and arrived at age 2
I hope that HELPS to seal the deal, another suggestion I would like to offer is that you are the MOM and you might tell her 4 year old dogs aren't often the first picked..I know you know all of that...just wanted to be supportive..Good luck...
Be Free..Judy
Lynne,
I would like to add that my 13 year old is a black LAB, hope that helps...He is still very active and appears to be very healthy.
Be Free..Judy
For me, if they're not willing to openly allow for the fact that there is

often a "chemistry" thing (not to mention practical issues) that can come up during the few weeks after an adoption, ... them. Though from this thread, I certainly see how there can be many interpretations of this aspect of a contract.

Many interpretations of "chemistry", too. Like the doctor who returned the female greyhound - - it had never really liked him - - she was head-shy upon return, never before. Never had any problems in her second, and last home.I suspect that people's opinions on this will depend on their personal experience. Obviously, I come from a pretty strong rescue bias. For every person you see who was abandoned by a rescue group (and yes, I admit this happens) I can name one (fortunately, not all our adopters) who never gave the dog a chance. We always take our dogs back, forever, no questions asked (though we do try to help solve problems if that's still a possibility for the adopters); we may or may not refund the adoption fee, depending on all sorts of things.

For repeat adopters, we'll do foster-to-adopt, and we are always desperate for foster homes so people who want to know what it's like to live with a greyhound can foster one and find out. But for me, to approach adoptions as trials is just asking for it not to be permanent. Maybe that's because I've taken in a number of dogs with issues such that there was no chemistry for a very long time.
Mustang Sally
Lynne
I think Shelly and who ever else mentioned the bitterness between rescue groups is dead on..I have never understood that as they are all working for the same cause.
I would like to offer this scenario..You love the dog, what if he showed up on your door step? You followed the routine of trying to find his owner. No luck...Would you not keep him? Would you not try to get him medical attention. I know that not everyone is the same when it comes to rescuing dogs. I also know that you do not need to set yourself and most especially your daughter up for heartache, but sometimes you just gotta go for it.
I can sure understand the lady from the rescue group being guarded (not because the dog is ill) because people are so damn crazy sometimes..and I am sure she has seen it all!!
I know you will do the right thing for you, your daughter and the dog. I hope it works out because I just know he wants to come home to your house. Good Luck
As I said before I have not had the luxury of choosing my rescued dogs, but I sure got lucky with the ones I found.
Be Free..Judy
I think Shelly and who ever else mentioned the bitterness between rescue groups is dead on..I have never understood that as they are all working for the same cause.

Yeah, I do think this is exactly the situation here, and it's confounding. I'm none too happy with the group that raised these doubts in my mind. It's been a really frustrating few days.
At any rate, I'm picking Bailey up tomorrow. :-)

Lynne
At any rate, I'm picking Bailey up tomorrow. :-)

Cool! I hope he turns out to be everything you want in a dog and a picture of health too.
Suja
Many interpretations of "chemistry", too. Like the doctor who returned the female greyhound - - it had never really liked him - - she was head-shy upon return, never before. Never had any problems in her second, and last home.

Yeah. I remember that story. That tale was ominous on so many levels.
I suspect that people's opinions on this will depend on their personal experience. Obviously, I come from a pretty strong ... I admit this happens) I can name one (fortunately, not all our adopters) who never gave the dog a chance.

Sure, I could see that. I would think a trial period would make it much easier to spot those people though. I've also seen plenty of people try to stick with a dog they genuinely didn't like because they were too embarassed to call the rescue to find out if they take returns. I always end up feeling *so* badly for both the owners and (especially) the dogs in those situations since they both deserve better than that. While I don't think trial periods would automatically make that never happen, I wonder if it would make it less embarassing for an owner to return a dog if its just not working for them.
We always take our dogs back, forever, no questions asked (though we do try to help solve problems if that's still a possibility for the adopters); we may or may not refund the adoption fee, depending on all sorts of things.

Those policies seem perfectly understanable and fair to me.
For repeat adopters, we'll do foster-to-adopt, and we are always desperate for foster homes so people who want to know what it's like to live with a greyhound can foster one and find out.

Also very cool.
But for me, to approach adoptions as trials is just asking for it not to be permanent.

I think your average joe poential adopter is either walking in more or less prepared to deal with what they might get, or not really clear on what's involved in selecting the right temperament for their personalities. While I'm all for trying to make things work if they can be worked out, I wonder if its unrealistic to expect first time adopters to know a) what they're really looking for, b) how to identify it when they see it, and c) to really know when to stick it out and when to cut their losses.

I can see your points. I also end up seeing a lot of results from the other side. The dogs pay either way.
Maybe that's because I've taken in a number of dogs with issues such that there was no chemistry for a very long time.

Oh, I agree. I took in JJ the scary cat in May, and only started being able to bond with her in any real way two weeks ago. But you and I aren't the average joe pet home, either. We tend to make more of a commitment when we put ourselves in the line of fire, so to speak.
Tara