it's so much easier when you stumble across the perfect dog, rather than trying to find him or her...
I have been in touch with several rescues, some excellent, some horrid. Some do amazing fundraisers and take dogs with problems to behaviorists and orthopedists, etc., and some lie. It's fun to find a dog who sounds perfect on petfinder, but super disappointing when I find the description was a total fabrication and the dog is living in a kennel away from people with a completely unknown temperament.
Today was my first day of three where I've planned to meet a bunch of dogs. I went to a lab rescue about 100 miles east of here and met three labs. The first two were great, but there was no connection. Number 3 was a great big yellow male who must have been trained in sales. He was attentive and affectionate and, because he is the favorite of the gal who runs the rescue, VERY well trained (she trains therapy dogs). After we romped and snuggled and played fetch, went for a hike and he got a nice long belly rub, she showed me his bag of tricks. He's very attentive and smart. Then we sat on the porch where he leaned on me while I had my arm around him. Needless to say, I am in love!
The bummer is that when I called my daughter to tell her about him, all she could say was "I DON'T WANT A FOUR YEAR OLD DOG! HE WILL DIE TOO SOON!! WAAHH!"
I have been trying to make her a part of this process because she LOVES dogs, but after 2 conversations lasting over an hour total, she's still not bending (she's out of town). She isn't even willing to go meet him because she says she doesn't want to fall in love with an "old" dog.

Rats! This boy is PERFECT. The gal who runs the rescue said she doesn't show him to many people, that she has to have a good feel for them first... seems like he was meant to be mine.
Now I have to work on my daughter, but I don't feel compelled to meet any other dogs. I feel deflated. I may lay down the "it's this dog or no dog (for now)" ultimatim.

Lynne
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I may lay down the "it's this dog or no dog (for now)" ultimatim.

I vote for this tactic :-)
Tara
The bummer is that when I called my daughter to tell her about him, all she could say was "I ... even willing to go meet him because she says she doesn't want to fall in love with an "old" dog.

Have you tried talking to her about general breed life expectancies? Labs have a pretty good shot at living long lives, while some breeds (e.g. Boxers and Great Danes) are likely to die at a younger age. Factoring that in, a four year old Lab ought to be around for a good, long time. And, even if you get a puppy, there are no guarantees. Unfortunately, no matter how long your dog lives, it will never be long enough.
Also, Matt will tell you that four is the perfect age. And, it's not old for a Lab!

Shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net (the Mother Ship)
http://esther.cat-sidh.net (Letters to Esther)
I am interested in ideas, not merely in visual products. Marcel Duchamp
The bummer is that when I called my daughter to tell her about him, all she could say was "I DON'T WANT A FOUR YEAR OLD DOG! HE WILL DIE TOO SOON!! WAAHH!"

That's why I hesitated to adopt a 5-yr old cat. She lived to be 18 and I didn't miss those destructively cute kitten years in the least. A Lab may well live to be 12 or 14 years old, so 4 isn't OLD, it's MATURE. Ish. Mature-ish. I'm not sure Labs ever really mature.
Now I have to work on my daughter, but I don't feel compelled to meet any other dogs. I feel deflated. I may lay down the "it's this dog or no dog (for now)" ultimatim.

If his age is her only objection, just tell her that you're OLD, too, and at least this way you'll outlive your dog. Or you can be buried together.
all she
could say was "I DON'T WANT A FOUR YEAR OLD DOG! HE WILL DIE TOO SOON!! WAAHH!"

I wouldn't consider a 4 year old dog old. However, even if it were so, I personally find a special joy in adopting seniors. Yes, sometimes the time together isn't long, but sometimes they surprise us. It really doesn't matter. Even if you get a puppy, in the end they all die too soon.
If you really want this dog (and it sounds like you do), if it were me I would get him and dear daughter would just have to deal. If you want her to be agreeable, then try pushing the positives, such as a dog this age is already trained..and he makes you happy.
Denise
I may lay down the "it's this dog or no dog (for now)" ultimatim.

Sounds reasonable to me. Four really isn't old, and if she's an approximately normal human being she'll bond her brains out with whatever dog you bring home.

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

In 2007, one trillion dollars worth of mortgages in the US will have their rates reset
Now I have to work on my daughter, but I don't feel compelled to meet any other dogs. I feel deflated. I may lay down the "it's this dog or no dog (for now)" ultimatim.

Friends of mine with 2 children (12 and 8) adopted a nice Golden mix this summer He was estimated at 2. Then he was estimated at 4. While they weren't looking for a 4 yo, they are in love and he's perfect. And sometimes, longevity is a crap shoot. I've known mid-large sized dogs who lived until 5, some who've lived to 18. No offense, but your daughter needs to grow up and understand that life is no guarantee and turning down a wonderful dog because he's "old" is BS.

Janet Boss
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
shelly (Email Removed) said in
Also, Matt will tell you that four is the perfect age.

What is, is. And four *is* the perfect age. Five isn't so bad, either, though six is growing on me.
And, it's not old for a Lab!

At four, many Labs have just put in the order for their body to brain co-ordination kit. Expect delivery Any Day Now.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
your daughter needs to grow up and understand that life is no guarantee and turning down a wonderful dog because he's "old" is BS.

she knows this already. She is only 11, and when she was only 6, our 5 year old dog who was very strongly bonded to her died from pancreatitis. So we talked about these things; the uncertainties in life. I also told her that he needs a family that is just right for him and that we are that family.
The good news is that we just got off the phone and she agreed to let me get him with conditions. The conditions being that he is "her" dog, he sleeps with her in her bed, the collar and leash have to be the colors she picked out, and we have to get him a bed with his name on it. Oh, and raised food and water bowls because it will be easier for him to eat and drink out of since he's so big. I can do that!!

So I'm off to the store to get him some essentials, and tomorrow, our new dog, Bailey, will be here! YIPPEE!!
Thanks for all the great suggestions. I was fully prepared to pull out the "it's this dog or no dog" line. At least she doesn't hate me (though I'm sure she'll find another reason to do so soon enough). I know she'll fall for him right away, too, just as I did. He's a love.

Lynne
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