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I was talking to Cate, just as Janet was talking to me.

sorry! i didn't realize it was a private conversation. i thought ya'll were talking about general reasons why crates are preferable to harnesses.

shelly (perfectly foul wench) and elliott and harriet http://home.bluemarble.net/~scouvrette
Take pictures. Please? Pretty please with sugar on top?

sure, i'll take them, but that doesn't mean i'll ever get them developed.
How can we "help"?

i knew i could count on you!

shelly (perfectly foul wench) and elliott and harriet http://home.bluemarble.net/~scouvrette
exasperation. i'm tellin' ya', there are times when it can make yer eyeballs implode.

Sounds like you need to chill. Life is way to short to get like that for little of nothing. Maybe you need a drinkie or two or three?
Gwen
Sounds like you need to chill. Life is way to short to get like that for little of nothing. Maybe you need a drinkie or two or three?

thank god i have you to tell me how i should respond to things. it's everso helpful. no, really.

shelly (perfectly foul wench) and elliott and harriet http://home.bluemarble.net/~scouvrette
See Janet's post about wet muddy dogs. There is a plus to crates.

that might be something for Cate to consider, but it's totally a non-issue for some people.

My entire car is a crate for a wet, muddy dog.
Cate
Although I have qualms about putting a wire crate in the car, getting into a wreck, and skewering my dog ... Does anyone use wire crates in cars, or are all the people on this thread using plastic crates for travel?

I've always used plastic in the house and on the road: they are very easy to clean up and keep swamp-mud off of the inside of my van when a filthy dog shakes.
I keep a Vari-kennel 500 and 400 strapped to a deck made of laminated MDF, raised about six inches off the floor of the van (third-row seats out). Rubbermaid rolling trays slide under the deck. One contains bumpers, the other miscellaneous Dog Bits.
When the Dog to be Named Later arrives on the scene, though, I may buy a wire kennel for the house. I've seen a friend's pup in it, and he seems to like being able to see all around him when he's resting in the crate because the household is too busy to Watch Him Like a Hawk. At night, he gets a towel over the top.
A propos the rest of this thread: Storm was crate trained for housebreaking and car transportation reasons. The crate makes it possible for me to take the van to the field and leave it wide open when training or at a trial. She gets plenty of breeze and is still safely confined.

Kate
and Storm the FCR
@geraldo.cc.utexas.edu:
See Janet's post about wet muddy dogs. There is a plus to crates. One a place to dry off and not get your seats all a mess. Even if you place a towel down, a large dog will get your seats wet.

My seats are always folded down and I have a rubber mat covering the cargo area.
Sure, my car smells like dog, but it's the dog car!

A coworker once got in and said 'Uh, I hate to tell you this, but your car smells like wet dog.'
I shrugged and said 'That's probably because I have three wet dogs in here every day.'
Cate
sure, i'll take them,

YAY!
but that doesn't mean i'll ever get them developed.

BOO!
i knew i could count on you!

Hey, what are cyber-notreallyfriendsbuttheydon'thateyou for?

Suja
I feel that it was partly a training issue. For example, my dogs won't leave the car without permission. After ... loading and unloading groceries, mulch, etc. I hope that I never get to find out just how good they are.

And what happens if you're in an accident serious enough to render you unconscious and let your dogs out on the highway? Less likely to happen if they're in crates. And when you have a breed like mine, emergency personnel are far less likely to do something like shoot the dog to get to my injured body (and yes, I visions of my dogs not allowing emergency workers close, they wouldn't, and might get killed because of it). If my dogs are in crates and the crates stay intact, they're far more likely to be rescued safely.
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