We have a small apartment in NYC.

9 to 5 We would take the dog to a business which cares for dogs and has lotsof open space.
We need a dog that doesn't shed too much.
The dog should be house trained. Perhaps an older dog without excessive energy?
I lean toward an older Labrador Retriever.
ANY SUGGESTIONS?!
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So long as you know a lab does shed. With a smaller place I'd lean towards a smaller non shedding breed that can get some exercise even in a small apartment. A greyhound would also work but again, they do shed, though it might not stand out as much as Lab hair.
Dawn
We have a small apartment in NYC. 9 to 5 We would take the dog to a business which cares ... should be house trained. Perhaps an older dog without excessive energy? I lean toward an older Labrador Retriever. ANY SUGGESTIONS?!

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Greyhound is not a good choice according to my dog book. They're race dogs and not very domestic. They also cruise at 40mph. Too athletic for the city. If he gets loose, I don't want a multi-county wide search! Any other advice out there?!
We have a small apartment in NYC. 9 to 5 We would take the dog to a business which cares ... should be house trained. Perhaps an older dog without excessive energy? I lean toward an older Labrador Retriever. ANY SUGGESTIONS?!

laughing hysterically at the thought of a Lab being described as 'not shedding too much'* *wipes tears from eyes

Okay. Now that I can breathe again, a Lab is definitely not the way to go if you don't want a heavy shedding dog. Labs blow coat twice a year, and shed copiously for the rest.
However, a retired racing greyhound seems to fit your bill quite well. Greys are indoor couch potatoes, and your doggie daycare would seem to take care of their need to run quite nicely. They are low-shedding, and are just wonderful apartment dogs.
Orchid
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Greyhound is not a good choice according to my dog book. They're race dogs and not very domestic.They also cruise at 40mph. Too athletic for thecity.

Not true at all. Don't believe everything you read in those breed books. Half the stuff I've read about my breed is WAY off. I mean, big time incorrect. One book I read said that Basenjis are "eager to please". I think they forgot the last word in that sentence though - "themselves" - cos one thing Basenjis ain't, and that's eager to please humans. I about exploded laughing for 3 seconds before I realized other people might read that and take it to heart.
Greyhounds are very sweet, docile dogs that do not require a lot of excercise. Ex-racers make especially nice pets. They also make pretty good apartment dogs so long as you are able to take them to a secure, off-lead park about once per week for a good romp. (Or the dog could probably get at at the daycare)
Labs shed quite a bit and need a fair amount of excercise, FWIW.

What kind of temperament are you looking for? What do you see yourself doing with your dog? There are lots of breeds that may physically accomodate your needs, but you may not like their personalities.
If housetraining is a must at the start, don't get a puppy. ;-)
-Andrea Stone
Saorsa Basenjis
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We need a dog that doesn't shed too much. The dog should be house trained. Perhaps an older dog without excessive energy?

What do you expect from the dog? Do you want a companion, or a watch dog, a couch potato?
Do you have kids? If so, are they under or over 12? If they are young - you want to stay away from tiny delicate dogs.
How much time do you want to spend grooming? Some dogs that don't shed do require alot of grooming time.
The retired greyhound racer idea is a good one. We have friends with one and his only demand is the entire couch! Emotion: smile
-Sunny
The best thing to do is to adopt a rescue dog from the many rescue groups in NYC; this way you can find out alot about the dogs temprement b4 you make the committment. And you will be giving a great dog a needed home. Many groups will even let you foster a dog to see if it is a good match - this is a far btter soution than picking a dog based on "breed" which often is not a good judge of an individuals personality.
Try http://strayfromtheheart.org - they are excellent
We have a small apartment in NYC. 9 to 5 We would take the dog to a business which cares ... should be house trained. Perhaps an older dog without excessive energy? I lean toward an older Labrador Retriever. ANY SUGGESTIONS?!

Basically you have to decide what kind of hair you want around you. If you dress a lot in black a light coloured dog isn't the best idea etc. I prefer the longer hairs, they do attach themselves to everything, but at least they don't go into the fabrics like harder shorter hairs do, so they are easier to get rid of. If I didn't like the feel of a long soft coat, my dogs would be wirecoated and trimmable, I beleive that way you get the smallest amount of loose hair, because the "dead" hair is being plucked out. An older dog would be a good idea, it would be housetrained and probably know some commands as well. If it is over 3 y old it would probably be more laid back too.
I recommend you make a list of what you want and what you don't want in a dog and start researching.
Rosa
Greyhound is not a good choice according to my dog book. They're race dogs and not very domestic.

Not true at all. There are about a dozen ex-racers that come to the dog park, and all are wonderful with people and big time leaners. Most just like to sack out on the couch according to their people. There is one who is not good with small dogs, but the rest are wonderful with dogs of all description as well.
They also cruise at 40mph. Too athletic for the city.

Not really. Unlike some of us who have to walk our dogs for miles on end and take them to the dog park daily, these guys seem to do okay with shorter walks as long as they get the chance to stretch their legs occasionally (once or twice a week). The ones that come to the dog park do a couple of laps (our park is small, maybe half an acre fenced in) and are done. And there is nothing quite like watching a Grey run. Since your dog will be going to doggie day care, the exercise requirements are most likely easily taken care of. BTW, I don't know any Greys that actively play with other dogs other than chase games - don't know if you care about that or not.
If he gets loose, I don't want a multi-county wide search!

That is most likely true. While they run fast, they don't run far, so all you have to do is find someone who's put their old couch out for curbside pick up to find your dog snoozing on it.
Any other advice out there?!

It's hard to find a low-non shedding breed that's also low energy. An older Rottie or Dane could be wonderfully mellow, but neither are what I'd call non-shedding dogs. If the shedding is not much of an issue, an older dog from lots of breeds would most likely fit the bill.

Suja
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