I've had dog doors in the past. None of them were totally free access - they were all beyond another door, and saved us from opening doors to the cold (and rain and snow) and at some points, gave the dog free access to the yard. My house has no logical or practical place for one, plus I don't want dogs out when I'm not home (easily solved with a panel). Still, there are times when I think one would be nice, but now that Spring has semi-sprung, we're leaving the door to the deck wide some of the time (even though that means maple tree "stuff" tracked into the house!), as we have the last few years.

Lucy still mostly stays in. Skipjack the cat never ventures out. Rudy is conflicted. He hangs out on the deck a lot, inside a bunch, and likes the choices. Marcie is an outdoor girl . She pops in once in awhile, but spends time in the yard, on the deck, in the yard, on the deck, you get the idea. I find the choices fascinating.

Janet Boss
I've had dog doors in the past. None of them were totally free access - they were all beyond another ... the yard, on the deck, in the yard, on the deck, you get the idea. I find the choices fascinating.

Muttley definitely enjoys the outdoors. He now has a tether long enough for him to lay at the front part of the deck where he can survey his domain. He can also go to the other end of the house, which is closer to the driveway, and from there he was able to intimidate the UPS girl, who asked "Does your dog bite?". "No, but he's not mine?". "No, he has false teeth?" He was safely tethered and I received the package, although it was actually for my neighbor, where she had left a package I had been expecting.
The problem with the long tether is that it often gets wrapped around a tree or caught on something so he can't come back to the door and ask to be let back in. Last night I heard him barking for a little while as he usually does, and then he was quiet for a long time. When I checked on him, he was sitting way up on a steep hill with the tether wrapped close around a small tree, and I could not direct him to go around the other way to untangle it.

So I had to clamber up the hill to a narrow path where I could just reach him. But I could not disentangle the lead, and I could just barely get to him to undo the clip from his collar. So I figured sometimes you just gotta trust the dog, and I let him free, whereupon he bounded down the hill and into the house. By the time I picked my way back down the hill, he was quietly resting on his dog bed.
Paul and Muttley
I've had dog doors in the past. None of them were totally free access - they were all beyond another ... the yard, on the deck, in the yard, on the deck, you get the idea. I find the choices fascinating.

After we moved into this house, we put in our first dog door next to the back door. It has a panel and two flaps, so it's easy to lock and the flaps keep most of the cold/hot air out. We've had no problem with strange animals trying to enter. We don't like to leave a house door open, especially in spring, because it gets very windy here (we've already had to replace the closer on a storm door twice after the door got caught in the wind - once the safety chain broke, and then, with a stronger chain, with such force that the strip of wood attached to the safety chain ripped right out.)
Oppie seems to enjoy the freedom of coming and going and not having to ask. The only problem is that when the yard is muddy, we aren't there at the door with a towel when he comes in, so there is more dirt tracked into the house. Still, it's a small price to pay for the convenience.
Now whenever we go in or out the back door, Oppie always uses "his" door.
FurPaw

Don't believe everything that you think.
To reply, unleash the dog.
I find the choices fascinating.

Me too. I like the freedom of the front porch especially, where they can watch the world and don't come across as so protective of the house. Something about being outside makes Friday feel that he doesn't have to alarm bark when somebody passes through his world.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
=A0I've had dog doors in the past. =A0None of them were totally free acce=ss - they were all beyond another ... deck, in the yard, on the deck, you get the idea. =A0 =A0I find th=e choices fascinating. Janet Bosswww.bestfriendsdogobedience.com

one of Hannah and Harley's favorite games is run in and out of the house at breakneck speed crashing into the couch.. then into the fence... then into the wall then back out to the fence.. then around the couch... then back out.
amazing... I am actually thinking of a dog door for them. it would need to be a slider door... and one that is big enough for a human.. not sure i feel save enough for that...
one of Hannah and Harley's favorite games is run in and out of the house at breakneck speed crashing into the couch.. then into the fence... then into the wall then back out to the fence.. then around the couch... then back out.

So I take it that Harley has completely overcome his fear of stairs?
amazing... I am actually thinking of a dog door for them. it would need to be a slider door... and one that is big enough for a human.. not sure i feel save enough for that...

If I were a burglar, I'd think twice about going into a dog door that was large enough for me to enter - it's saying something about the size of the dog! Then again, I'm not a burglar and I don't know how one would think - and I had a similar concern when I lived in NJ.
FurPaw

Don't believe everything that you think.
To reply, unleash the dog.
FurPaw (Email Removed) said in
If I were a burglar, I'd think twice about going into a dog door that was large enough for me to enter - it's saying something about the size of the dog!

All I know about buglary I know from novels (so it's not worth much), but anything to indicate that dogs live in your house or yard is probably enough to make the bad guys move on to the next house.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.