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I'm sorry, but that doesn't make sense unless your dog is a marker. Not all are. And when I say ... I don't understand how that works in practice. If the dog doesn't need to pee it's not going to pee.

Well, Khan is obliging enough that he'll fake-a-pee when asked, when he feels that he doesn't need to pee. The funny thing is that I can stand there and tell him 'I saw that, go pee', and he'll head back and pee for real this time, even if it is a drop or two.
Pan is less inclined to pee when she doesn't have to (and even lesser inclined if there is even the teensiest drizzle), but will empty when asked. I learned that when we have to go on hikes, I have to make sure that she absolutely does go before getting back in the car. She is less than thrilled to go if the surface is uneven or rocky, and after exerting herself and drinking plenty of water while hiking she'll hold it in hopes that she'll come across her preferred surface for peeing. If that happens, she'll just go where she happens to be, and where she happens to be was inside the dogmobile once.
Suja
Pan is less inclined to pee when she doesn't have to (and even lesser inclined if there is even the teensiest drizzle), but will empty when asked.

About an hour ago Emmett came and asked to go out, and I realized that possibly the disconnect is that although I'm letting dogs in and out (and in and out and in and out and in and ... ) all day, except for first thing in the morning and right before bed the dogs don't all go out at the same time. The only one who can be counted on is Slick, who will happily go to the other side of the door whenever it opens. It's still pretty warm here and Emmett doesn't like to be outside unless it's cool, so he won't go out unless he's got to. I'm glad he asks. Beats the alternative!
Crow has figured out how to open the storm door on the porch, so she lets herself out when she needs to go (Saber does, too). Unfortunately the storm door on the front has the same kind of latch and when I was loading the dogs to go to the kennel a few weeks ago they got excited (as they always do when we load) and Crow let herself out, ran over to the truck, and tried to jump into one of the boxes. It was closed so it didn't work out all that well for her, but I was a combination of proud of her smarts and alarmed by her smarts.

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Prouder than ever to be a member of the reality-based community
I was a combination of proud of her smarts and alarmed by her smarts.

I think that pretty much sums up life with a Siberian.

Mustang Sally
I honestly do not remember the last time my dog has thrown up, literally. I don't recall him ever throwing ... He'll occasionally have a bit of loose stool, but he is able to control it until I take him outside.

My dog Finn didn't really have a problem with this either. Maybe once his whole youth and adult life. That is, until the last two years of his life. The infection in his bones spread, and he'd have bouts of loose stools. In the last 6 months, he'd sometimes have to go out 2 or 3 times a night.

And boy was I damned glad that he knew how to wake me up appropriately to tell me he had to go out. Ok, not "glad" exactly, at least not at that specific moment, but far less cranky than I would have been to wake up to
2 or three puddles of watery poop all over the place.

Tara
I honestly do not remember the last time my dog ... is able to control it until I take him outside.

My dog Finn didn't really have a problem with this either. Maybe once his whole youth and adult life. That ... I would have been to wake up to 2 or three puddles of watery poop all over the place. Tara

The one time my dog had runs in his kennel I was woken up by him whining about, which is understandable, as he stood in the only corner of his kennel that didn't have liquid poop. Of course I had to get up at 3 in the morning to give the dog a bath, take his kennel apart and clean it, and clean the carpet around his kennel. That wasn't a fun day at work.
The one time my dog had runs in his kennel I was woken up by him whining about, which is ... his kennel apart and clean it, and clean the carpet around his kennel. That wasn't a fun day at work.

I would much prefer that my dog wake me up in a gentle (but insistent) way to go out, than wake me up after the fact.
How old is your dog, by the way?
Tara
This is one of those stupid human things. You'd think that I'll just keep the leash near the front door, ... could just as well have told him to stay and he'd stay by the door instead of following me around.

Hmm, I've noticed, at least with my collies, the urka-gurkas and obedience seem to be incompatible. They are normally quite obedient but I don't think either one would do a stay when in the throes of pre-vomiting.

Chris and her smoothies
Pablo & Lucy (collies) and Smudgie (Lhasa with a crew cut)
Hmm, I've noticed, at least with my collies, the urka-gurkas and obedience seem to be incompatible. They are normally quite obedient but I don'tthink either one would do a stay when in the throes of pre-vomiting.

I'm fairly certain that Khan will do it. Next time it happens (either Urka-Gurkas or runny poop), I'll try it and let you know.

Suja
Ok, so I would never let my dog tell me ... behaved and doing as he is told as his job.

I agree. Must have missed the "request for rawhide" (I personally don't give the stuff). Paul - bring a chew with you to class tomorrow night.

Of course, Muttley reacted much differently at the training class, by just sniffing or licking the chew when offered by Janet or myself. He was probably on high alert because of the other dogs. I don't remember if this was before or after his little aggression incident.

BTW, that was somewhat scary. There had been some barking, growling, and posturing early in the class, and Muttley came in as that was subsiding. We had positioned ourselves with dogs sitting calmly, when Muttley suddenly, and without apparent provocation or warning, lunged and snapped at the fairly large young dog about six feet to my right. I held him back as well as I could, but I was holding the leash mostly with just my right hand. I know I grabbed the leash with my left hand almost immediately to regain control, and with such force that one of my fingernails cut my hand.
Only once before, as long as I have seen or "owned" Muttley, has he done anything this aggressive. The situation (early this summer) was that Muttley was tethered in the back of my house while my friend George was helping me work on my house. He had previously made friends with Muttley, although he seemed a bit tentative, and Muttley was still cowering somewhat. Then he was banging nails on the siding, while Muttley was barking excitedly. I was busy, but tried to calm him down from time to time.

Then George went past Muttley to move some materials, and Muttley seemed calm and quiet, but as soon as George had his back turned, Muttley suddenly lunged and bit him in the rear end. Luckily it was not serious, but it was very painful. George has been back again this week, and he is now very afraid of Muttley, although he has been able to pet him briefly in my presence, and Muttley does not seem fearful or aggressive.
I think I know Muttley pretty well now, and I think his behavior about lunging for the treats is because he is excited at the prospect of chewing on them. When I offer him food, it is usually a very small piece, and he takes it from my hand with mostly his lips, or gently with his teeth. He always seemed to do that, even when my friend Helene first met him and gave him a dog biscuit. The black Lab, the pregnant Rottweiler, and the other small dog in his "pack" also took food gently even when hungry, and were tested for food aggression.

When I offer Muttley a chew in a non-distractive situation at home, he is very excited to get it, and he runs with it to his dog bed to chew it, or runs to the bed first and seems very excited to get it. I think he perceives it as a toy or an outlet for his energy, rather than simply food.Overall, I am satisfied with his demeanor and his progress in training, but I think it will continue to be difficult for him to be gentle with Photon. He is good about staying behind a screen door watching intently as I call Photon from her hiding place outside onto the porch, and I can pet her, feed her, and pick her up without complaint, and she even will approach the door and look at him. However, if I put on his leash and let him out, he pulls hard and whines and barks as he sees her run off, and then is agitated for a while.

His sudden lunge and bite without warning at the class makes me think that it is part of his instinctual or learned survival skill where he could effectively catch a small animal as prey, or establish dominance over another dog. It is a smart move on his part, although a bit scary if he does not show a warning.
Paul
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