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I'm sorry, but that doesn't make sense unless your dog is a marker. Not all are. And when I say ... I don't understand how that works in practice. If the dog doesn't need to pee it's not going to pee.

Harriet will pee whenever she's taken out. Sometimes it's only a small amount, but she does pee. I don't think she's much of a pee marker. On walks, she usually will only pee once instead of making multiple stops.
She does*, however, scratch and kick up an awful lot of grass when she poops around other dogs. I took her out last night for a "last call" potty break, and there was a dog on an upper balcony who barkbarkbarked at her. Harriet pooped, made a big production of scratching, then turned toward the balcony and snorted as loudly as she could. Bless her pointy little head.That said, I don't get the "don't ever give them what they ask for" nonsense. In a drastic case, where the dog is pushy and lacks respect, I can see instituting that as part of a NILIF plan, until the behavior is out of control. Otherwise, I find it very helpful to have the dog be able to communicate what she wants, and to have some hope that she might actually *get it, at least on occasion. That's especially true when the dog has learned that she has to give something in exchange for whatever she wants.

If she wants a cookie, she knows where they are kept, and she knows what sorts of tricks I'm a sucker for. I'm probably better trained than she is. When she needs to go outside, she tells me, and we go out. On those occasions, it's a business walk, not for pleasure, so she knows that she will get her needs met, but that she will probably not be going out for funsies.

Shelly (Warning: see label for details)
http://www.cat-sidh.net (the Mother Ship)
http://esther.cat-sidh.net (Letters to Esther)
I think I know Muttley pretty well now, and I think his behavior about lunging for the treats is because ... a very small piece, and he takes it from my hand with mostly his lips, or gently with his teeth.

I deal with this problem by holding the treat in my closed fist, telling the dog to sit or down, then calmly presenting the dog with the back of my closed hand. The dog invariably noses my hand, which I turn over and open, then the dog takes the treat with no snapping or biting or other assorted obnoxiousness.

Shelly (Warning: see label for details)
http://www.cat-sidh.net (the Mother Ship)
http://esther.cat-sidh.net (Letters to Esther)
I deal with this problem by holding the treat in my closed fist, telling the dog to sit or down, ... I turn over and open, then the dog takes the treat with no snapping or biting or other assorted obnoxiousness.

The only treat he is grabbing is a rawhide chip (which I've advised Paul to cut back on, but also, how to work on it and when to offer it). Can't fit the chip into a closed hand!
Just to comment on Muttley's incident last evening - he truly was sitting at heel, very calmly. Paul has been making excellent progress heeling with him on a slack lead and not over-controlling. The dogs and handlers were lined up and the other dog (a young blue Weim) was not doing anything but sitting at heel as well. He's a pretty reactive dog overall, but his owner handled the incident well, with a little coaching. It really seemed out of the blue, but dusk had fallen and it may not be easy to see subtle signs of a non-relaxed state.
Here's the weird thing - the night before, 2 dogs who normally get along well, broke into a fight on the very same spot. I'm wondering about the possibility of something else being at that spot prior to Monday night's incident, or if Monday night's incident left behind markers that incited last night's incident. Regardless, we're avoiding that area!
After Muttley's incident, they were all a little stressed out. Down was just not a good idea. Hope the down is working better for you at home Paul, and we'll start with that next week, after some heeling, in order to choose the least "hot" time.

Janet Boss
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
The only treat he is grabbing is a rawhide chip (which I've advised Paul to cut back on, but also, how to work on it and when to offer it). Can't fit the chip into a closed hand!

Sure you can, more or less. The main point is to hold the chip in your hand while calmly presenting the back of your hand to the dog, making sure that the dog can clearly see that it's the back of your hand. I do it all the time with my nearly former neighbor's Chowy dogs, when giving them rawhide chips. Otherwise, they will bite, and they do it hard enough to leave nasty bruises. Rotten brats!

Obviously, it's not foolproof, but it greatly decreases the likelihood of the dog grabbing/snapping at the treat and biting you.
Here's the weird thing - the night before, 2 dogs who normally get along well, broke into a fight on ... night's incident, or if Monday night's incident left behind markers that incited last night's incident. Regardless, we're avoiding that area!

That sounds likely. If there is a lingering smell of something of value, it might be worth resource guarding.
I'm really glad Paul and Muttley are finally able to work with you!

Shelly (Warning: see label for details)
http://www.cat-sidh.net (the Mother Ship)
http://esther.cat-sidh.net (Letters to Esther)
The one time my dog had runs in his kennel ... around his kennel. That wasn't a fun day at work.

I would much prefer that my dog wake me up in a gentle (but insistent) way to go out, than wake me up after the fact. How old is your dog, by the way? Tara

About two and a half years old. I know he is still young and will probably have more occurances, but from what I remember of other dogs I have had from puppies, he has a very low occurance rate of runs and vomit.
No, you aren't asking too much at all. Either he takes it nice or he doesn't get to have it, period. And I would also be doing NILIF with treats and he has to earn them by doing a sit/stay or down/stay. Any lunging and he does not get it. Just put away and try again a few minutes later. He's just been rewarded for lunging for the rawhide, now you just have to have the patience to undo that.
Lauralyn