I took my 3 year old lab on a 2 hour hike yesterday for the first time and it was too much for her. The trail was a bit steep in certain parts and the terrain has a lot of rocks and gravel.
She's been in quite a bit of discomfort since, limping and reluctant to move. I don't think she was injured, but I'm not sure if her pads are sore or if it's muscular soreness. I'll wait a couple more days and if she hasn't recovered, I'll take her to the vet.
Just wondering if this kind of recovery period is typical when hiking with dogs. Are there any pain releivers I should give her?
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Just wondering if this kind of recovery period is typical when hiking with dogs.

No.
Are there any pain releivers I should give her?

Algyval is pretty amazing for this sort of thing, but I'd definitely see a vet if she's still tender after a couple of days.

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Repealing the estate tax will cost a family earning about $70,000/year an additional $500/year or so in additional income taxes
I'd definitely see a vet if she's still tender after a couple of days.

i'll second that. by the time either of my dogs is showing obvious signs of pain, they are in agony.

shelly
http://home.bluemarble.net/~scouvrette>> http://cat-sidh.blogspot.com

Anything can be any color at any time depending on what color everything else is at the time.
Keith Crown
i'll second that. by the time either of my dogs is showing obvious signs of pain, they are in agony.

I've found that it varies a lot by dog (mine tend to be pretty stoic but Duncan was a big weenie and Crow seems to be, too). You have to know your dog, and with enough experience you develop a sense of what needs immediate attention and what are "normal" owies that will clear up quickly and neatly without veterinary intervention. Lameness is generally one of those things that I don't call the vet about unless it doesn't clear up quickly (day or two) or unless it's quite severe and remains so for more than 4 or 5 hours.
This past winter I laid Emmett off for a week after he came in from the yard limping. He was still a bit gimpy the next day, but better, and by the third day he was fine (I gave him a few more days just in case). The only non-routine thing I've called the vet about recently was a weird lump on Cinder's face, which (fortunately!) turned out to be an abscess. (But wow, was that gross when it drained!)
Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Repealing the estate tax will cost a family earning about $70,000/year an additional $500/year or so in additional income taxes
Is this the first time, or has this happened before after a long period of exercise? I knew a lab that whenever he went running for an hour, or for a long walk would start dragging his back leg and limping. If it hurt that bad he wouldn't even get out of his bed... Turned out he had the common lab problem with his hips...

Donna
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I've found that it varies a lot by dog (mine tend to be pretty stoic but Duncan was a big weenie and Crow seems to be, too).

good point. i've got my stoic bully breed filter on. and, i'm a little spooked by yesterday's, um, excitement.
You have to know your dog, and with enough experience you develop a sense of what needs immediate attention and what are "normal" owies that will clear up quickly and neatly without veterinary intervention.

absolutely! but, someone coming to a newsgroup and asking *us* if his/her dog is in enough pain to worry about doesn't make me think s/he has developed a spidey sense regarding this particular dog.
Lameness is generally one of those things that I don't call the vet about unless it doesn't clear up quickly (day or two) or unless it's quite severe and remains so for more than 4 or 5 hours.

it depends on which dog and what sort of lameness. elliott's rear assembly is a little arthritic, so if he seems a little stiff, i give him an aspirin and wait and see. if harriet were to come up lame, i'd worry and would be more likely to take her to the vet.
This past winter I laid Emmett off for a week after he came in from the yard limping. He was ... but better, and by the third day he was fine (I gave him a few more days just in case).

that's how i handle elliott's occasional lameness. there's not really anything else *to* do about it.
The only non-routine thing I've called the vet about recently was a weird lump on Cinder's face, which (fortunately!) turned out to be an abscess. (But wow, was that gross when it drained!)

eew! that doesn't sound fun.

shelly
http://home.bluemarble.net/~scouvrette>> http://cat-sidh.blogspot.com

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Francis Picabia
absolutely! but, someone coming to a newsgroup and asking *us* if his/her dog is in enough pain to worry about doesn't make me think s/he has developed a spidey sense regarding this particular dog.

A lot of new owners really can't tell. I don't know. The other thing is that if you trust that your vet to be straight with you, it's always a good idea to give them a call, describe what's going on, and ask whether or not the dog should be brought in. I'm very fortunate to have a vet who'll tell me when and how to treat things myself (like when Emmett stuck his face down a yellowjacket nest - the vet told me not to bring him in, but just give him some Benadryl myself).

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Repealing the estate tax will cost a family earning about $70,000/year an additional $500/year or so in additional income taxes
A lot of new owners really can't tell. I don't know.

there's definitely a learning curve.
The other thing is that if you trust that your vet to be straight with you, it's always a good idea to give them a call, describe what's going on, and ask whether or not the dog should be brought in.

that's the thing i don't have right now. i'm pretty happy with my current vet options, but i miss being able to ask "how worried should i be" over the phone.
(like when Emmett stuck his face down a yellowjacket nest - the vet told me not to bring him in, but just give him some Benadryl myself).

that'll learn 'im to be nosy!

shelly
http://home.bluemarble.net/~scouvrette>> http://cat-sidh.blogspot.com

I shut my eyes in order to see.
Paul Gauguin
(like when Emmett stuck his face down a yellowjacket nest ... bring him in, but just give him some Benadryl myself).

that'll learn 'im to be nosy!

Hasn't done it since, that's for sure.

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Repealing the estate tax will cost a family earning about $70,000/year an additional $500/year or so in additional income taxes
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