What is your opinion of or experience with obedience classes as given at local county schools? I was looking into this before I took the classes at the SPCA. The cost is $50 for 9 weeks, and is conducted indoors. The link for the sign up sheet is: http://www.glrrc.org/dog obed/Dog Obedience.doc. Note that it has specific questions about whether the dog has bitten a person or dog, and asks for an explanation.
Paul
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What is your opinion of or experience with obedience classes as given at local county schools? I was looking into ... that it has specific questions about whether the dog has bitten a person or dog, and asks for an explanation.

I've added that to mine, although I still don't expect that people are honest about it.
These classes are good. I note that she says choke collars only, but I know dogs work on head collars sometimes, don't remember about other collars. It's a school gym. It's a fairly large space, which is good, and "traditional" obedience.
I still don't think a group class is a wise choice for you and Muttley.

Janet Boss
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
What is your opinion of or experience with obedience classes as given at local county schools?

Unless someone has taken that particular class, their opinion and experience really isn't going to be relevant as to whether it's an appropriate class for Muttley. Classes of that sort vary widely and wildly, depending on the facility and the instructor.
In any case, at this point, I think it's been pretty well established that group classes aren't an appropriate setting for him.
Note that it has specific questions about whether the dog has bitten a person or dog, and asks for an explanation.

If this wasn't a text-based forum, I'd post an animated cartoon of someone beating a dead horse. :-P
Instead of focusing on what a signup sheet asks YOU (and in the process, apparently trying to re-open your agenda/vendetta), and soliciting opinions from people who have no way of knowing anything about that particular class and instuctor, IMO your time would be far better spent in turning off your computer and taking some constructive action to investigate the class.

That would mean CALLING the instructor, HONESTLY describing the issues you have with Muttley, including being honest about the fact that you lost control of him in a similar class and he injured another dog, and asking her if you think her beginner class is an appropriate setting for him. It would also mean getting in your car, driving to the facility, and actually OBSERVING the class a couple of times, so that you would have first-hand information about the set-up, the methods, and so forth.
Note that it has specific questions about whether the dog has bitten a person or dog, and asks for an explanation.

Instead of focusing on what a signup sheet asks YOU (and in the process, apparently trying to re-open your agenda/vendetta), ... and he injured another dog, and asking her if you think her beginner class is an appropriate setting for him.

Exactly.
I don't know what Paul's motivation for making this post was, but I get the impression that he's looking for permission to play a cat and mouse game with future obedience instructors. Of course, that's his prerogative, but if he does so, it's a pretty nasty thing to do. If you know your dog has issues, it's your job to bring them to the instructor's attention; it is not the instructor's job to ferret that information out of you.

Shelly (Warning: see label for details)
http://www.cat-sidh.net (the Mother Ship)
http://esther.cat-sidh.net (Letters to Esther)
If this wasn't a text-based forum, I'd post an animated cartoon of someone beating a dead horse. :-P

And if Janet hadn't actually met Paul and Muttley, this new thread would be the final proof that Paul is conducting some sort of experiment to see how long people will keep responding to his posts.
It doesn't matter what anyone here says. Paul is going to do what he wants to - or NOT do what he doesn't want to. Now, normally, that's a perfectly reasonable response to advice given over the internet. But in this case, because of the repeated requests, it's getting really, really tiresome.

I'd killfile the whole thing but I wouldn't know where to start. So I guess I'll just "ignore" until he goes away.
So if all y'alls find the thread drifting into something interesting, please start a new thread so I won't miss it.
Judy
Instead of focusing on what a signup sheet asks YOU (and in the process, apparently trying to re-open your agenda/vendetta), ... class a couple of times, so that you would have first-hand information about the set-up, the methods, and so forth.

Excellent advice. I don't have any hope that Paul will take it, of course, but it's good advice nonetheless.
Mustang Sally
It doesn't matter what anyone here says. Paul is going to do what he wants to - or NOT do what he doesn't want to.

The flip side of that is that protracted discussions of the finer points of working with a dog nobody (other than Janet) has seen are not going to tend to be all that useful, anyway.
I can't remember whether "absurd" or "ridiculous" comes first, but it seems to me that this discussion has passed through both, is currently visiting "asinine," and is making a beeline for "just plain assey."

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Betweem 2000 and 2005, the US government's future liabilities increased by $26 trillion. The single largest increment is Medicare Part D.
What is your opinion of or experience with obedience classes as given at local county schools?

No one can tell if a particular class is good for you and your dog. Standard advice for any obedience class for any dog is to get recommendations, talk to the instructor, then go and see what is going on in the class. This will allow you to have a better idea of whether the instructor is good, how the dogs in the class are doing, and how the humans are responding. If possible, observe the class towards the beginning, and then go back towards the end; that way, you should be able to see how much progress the dogs have made during the session.
In this case, I would have a completely honest converstion with the instructor about the problems you've had with this dog first, and then go meet the instructor or have them evaluate him. I don't know the rules followed in this class, but there are many that will not accept dogs that have bitten humans or other dogs.
Suja
Standard advice for any obedience class for any dog is to get recommendations, talk to the instructor, then go and see what is going on in the class.

It's interesting that Paul did just that, back in July. He came to the classes and I met with him and Muttley then. He talked with some of the students at the time as well.
In this case, I would have a completely honest converstion with the instructor about the problems you've had with this ... followed in this class, but there are many that will not accept dogs that have bitten humans or other dogs.

I know this class, but don't know the answer to that either. They do have a waiver, as I do, putting responsibility and liability on the dog owner. I think it's really important to understand that before attending classes, even if the instructor says yes.

Janet Boss
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
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