Hi Everyone,
We have a 7 year old female bassett hound who has mainly sayed outdoors with only an occasional visit inside the house. On Monday we took her to the vet to have a bump on her side surgically removed, and the vet asked that we keep her indoors for 2 weeks until things heal and the stitches are removed.
At night we keep her in a large laundry room, but while we're home during the day we hoped to let her run free in the house.

Monday evening after getting home from the vet, all went well. We let her run around the house with an occasional bathroom visit to the back yard. Not long before bedtime though we noticed two pee spots down the hallway. In our house the hallway and living room are carpet while the kitchen, dining area, an laundry area are all linoleum floor. I figured she saw the long, dark hallway as a secluded place to pee, so we decided to put up a barrier going into the hallway so she'd say in the open, well lit area. No probs the rest of the evening.

Tuesday we let her run around the house (except the hallway) while at work, and all was wonderful. We took her out to pee before leaving for work at 7am and after getting home around 5pm. That evening no problems either figured pee problem fixed.
Wedneday my wife was home most of the day, and no problems, but once I got home and took down the barrier to the hallway the dog ran down and pee'd right in t he same spot as before. I put the barrier back up and she pee'd in the living room. I then put up a barrier between the carpet and floor areas, but while in the other room she got throgh and pee'd in living room a second time.
With all this it's become obvious that she looks at the carpet as 'grass' and pee's anyplace she wants. The linoleum floor though she's never pee'd on. Is there any suggested way to train or keep her from peeing inside or specifically not on the carpet? At least on the linoleum we can clean it up easier, but everytime she gets on the carpet she now decides to pee.
Sorry for the long post, but I thought it best to give the whole story incase there's something I'm missing.
Thanks
Sam Alex
Sorry for the long post, but I thought it best to give the whole story incase there's something I'm missing.

Obligatory question: Why is your Bassett Hound an outside dog? Do you have a pack of hunters?
As you've probably figured out, she pees inside because she hasn't been trained to not pee inside. Add to that: She pees inside because she doesn't see the house as part of her living area because she's an outside Bassett Hound. Catch 22.

For what it's worth, that you've been taking her out on a schedule is a good thing - this is a great housetraining method for dogs of all ages. Please use this opportunity to acclimate your middle-aged dog to the great indoors.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
Sorry for the long post, but I thought it best to give the whole story incase there's something I'm missing.

Obligatory question: Why is your Bassett Hound an outside dog? Do you have a pack of hunters? As you've probably ... all ages. Please use this opportunity to acclimate your middle-aged dog to the great indoors. Matt. Rocky's a Dog.

also keep in mind, if she's on any medications, post surgery, they may be affecting her bladder control, as well. side affects can do nasty or odd things to a dog's system
Hi Rocky and everyone else who responded...
Our Bassett was my wife's dog before we got married, and being a gift to my wife from a friend 7 years ago she wasn't living in a place that allowed animals ... so the Bassett was kept at her family's home as an outside dog. Over the years as my wife moved, the dog has stayed in the same yard with another small dog, then earlier this year we moved the dog to our house, which has a huge back yard for her to run around in.
For me and my wife, growing-up we never had inside animals, and being the dog was raised outside we figured this was fine for her. We built her a large doghouse, she has a covered area, tons of shade, and a large fenced in yard to roam around in. Our house isn't large, so keeping her inside almost seems cruel with such a large outdoors area to venture through. Plus most of the neighborhood yards have a dog which she's started 'talking' to Emotion: smile
But that asside, I know her peeing on the carpet is due to a lack of training, but it seems she has self trained herself to think while indoors the carpet is an acceptable place to pee. Currently we're keeping her isolated to the linoleum floor areas, but if we can find a good way to train her not to pee on the carpets I'd love for her to have the full run of the house. That was my primary question... how to keep her or train her from peeing on the carpet.

Also her peeing isn't due to drugs or anything from surgery. Watching her it's obvious she thinks the areas she's peeing in are acceptable or 'normal' for some reason.
Thanks again for all the replies, and for any other hits or tips that can be offered.
Sam Alex
Hi Rocky and everyone else who responded... Our Bassett was my wife's dog before we got married, and being a ... reason. Thanks again for all the replies, and for any other hits or tips that can be offered. Sam Alex[/nq]do you know if the people who had the house before you had pets of any sort?? We just bought our house las fall and have been having similar problems. our house trained dogs have picked a few spots they they feel it's ok to pee at inside the house. One of them does occasionally have problems because of his heart medication. but does his best to hold it and let you know for as long as he can. (Occassionaly the teenager doesn't listen and we have accidents though...) The other 2 dogs don't have that excuse...

But it turns out that the previous owner had a cat and an elderly basset hound. They had the carpets commercially cleaned before we bought the house, but, there was apparently enough left (from years of pet ownership..) that our dogs felt they needed to remark their space, and not feel "guilty" about it..
(This is part of why we're planning on replacing everything with wood or tile...)
For me and my wife, growing-up we never had inside animals, and being the dog was raised outside we figured this was fine for her.

No, it's not fine unless you're spending much of your time outside with her - much like a working rancher would do with his pack of cattle or sheep dogs.
We built her a large doghouse, she has a covered area, tons of shade, and a large fenced in yard to roam around in.

How much time do you spend with her out in the yard? IMO, shelter, shade, and space run a far 2nd, 3rd, and 4th to companionship.
Our house isn't large, so keeping her inside almost seems cruel with such a large outdoors area to venture through.

Dogs generally do not self-exercise. While your Bassett Hound may be following her nose around your yard, she'd be happier following it around your house where the rest of her "pack" lives. Personally, I think you have your priorities skewed and can't understand why you own a companion animal if you're not maintaining it in an atmosphere which fosters companionship in such pack-oriented breed.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
our house trained dogs have picked a few spots they they feel it's ok to pee at inside the house.

Please be sure to get a cleaning product that contains enzymes that will "eat" the urine.
Most pet stores have inexpensive black lights and you can go around your house to find the spots that need treatment.
Regular cleaners will not work.
But that asside, I know her peeing on the carpet is due to a lack of training, but it seems ... from surgery. Watching her it's obvious she thinks the areas she's peeing in are acceptable or 'normal' for some reason.

When she is outdoors has she ever had to concern herself with where to pee. Or has it been pretty she can relieve herself where and when she feels the need? Because that is the way it is with most outdoor dogs. I'm not sure why a dog that has always gone where and when it wants should suddenly be hit with the insight that there is such a thing as the wrong place. Her only constraint given her background would be that she doesn't want to soil herself, or the place she prefers to rest and eat. There is no reason for her to understand that anything else is a problem.

You can house train such a dog, usually, pretty much the way you would a puppy. By as much supervision as you can manage, no opportunity to leave your presence to go unobserved, and confinement to close quarters when close supervision is not possible. The book "How to Housetrain Your Dog in Seven Days" outlines it pretty well. Shouting, scolding and similar responses will not help, and will often make it worse.

Diane Blackman
There is no moral victory in proclaiming to abhor violence while preaching with violent words.
http://dog-play.com / http://dogplayshops.com /
An adult dog coming into the house needs to be housebroken just like a puppy. That means pretty much constant vigilance while she is in the house; one common suggestion that works well is to put her on a leash, and either keep hold of the leash (loop around the wrist) or, if her leash manners are okay for this, run a belt through the hand-loop and wear the belt. You, or your wife (whoever is home and in charge of the dog) must keep an eye out for signs that the dog needs to "go" and take her outside. Praise her enthusiastically when she does her business outdoors! If you catch her starting to urinate in the house, say on that carpet, distract her and take her outside immediately, and praise her when she finishes.
The good news is that typically an adult dog has good bladder control already, and certainly she has a mature brain and will probably catch on and retain the idea quicker than a puppy. However, you should talk to your vet about the nature of her surgery and any meds she may be on. Some medications and conditions can cause urge incontinence it's not a matter of her not being able to "hold it" but of needing to urinate more often than you expect, often without as much warning as an adult should have. This would mean that you might have to treat her more like a puppy in terms of expecting to take her out often and with little notice.