My family got a lab/german sheppard puppy for Christmas, it is a great dog.
9 weeks old today, and weighs 16 lbs. She already understands the command"no", and is coming along well with sit and stay. The only problem I am having is her using the bathroom in the garage. Her bed is in the garage, as it is insulated (the garage) and stays warmer than outside. I put a doggie door in the exterior door in the garage so she can get outside, and she already knows how to use it well.
My question, how do I stop her from using the bathroom in the garage?

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My family got a lab/german sheppard puppy for Christmas, it is a great dog. 9 weeks old today, and weighs ... knows how to use it well. My question, how do I stop her from using the bathroom in the garage?

One or two quick questions, first: How much do you like your new puppy and do you have goals? What is your level of influence within the household, B Kiker - are you a child or a parent? If you could, would you like to be able to bring your new dog inside with the rest of her new family?
In my opinion, there are more issues here than a puppy pooping in a garage.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog. "No" is not a command.
()
In my opinion, there are more issues here than a puppy pooping in a garage.

Yeah.
What he said.

Handsome Jack Morrison
*gently remove the detonator to reply by e-mail
France.
First of all, I am the parent. Secondly, NO I do not want a dog in my house. Some people may want dogs in their house, I personally do NOT. I love the new puppy, she is a good dog. As far as goals, no I do not have a list of goals for her. I would like for her just to be a good dog, not to jump on people, or bite etc.. It seems that I have hit a nerve with you "Rocky" and "Handsome Jack Morrison", which I did not mean to, all I wanted was some advice on solving my problem, perhaps I posted my question in the wrong news group!
First of all, I am the parent. Secondly, NO I do not want a dog in my house. Some people ... her. I would like for her just to be a good dog, not to jump on people, or bite etc..

The best way to have a well-behaved, well-socialized dog is to have as much interaction with the family as possible and, frankly, to take it to an introductory "good doggie" training class. An isolated dog is apt to develop a range of bad habits, including barking and howling, digging and destructiveness, rude behavior towards family members and strangers, and so on. The puppy's current living situation is, in fact, ideal for producing a bad dog, not a good one.
Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Let us develop a kind of dangerous unselfishness ML King
Thank you for you advice.
First of all, I am the parent. Secondly, NO I do not want a dog in my house. Some people ... all I wanted was some advice on solving my problem, perhaps I posted my question in the wrong news group!

Collective wisdom (and experience) in this group is that one of the basic building blocks that are required to have a well-trained and behaved dog is to have it in close proximity to you as much as possible. Thus, while you may get comments, chances are good that they will all include some form of "the dog should be in the house" comment.
That being said, here is how I would train the puppy to not go in the garage.First of all, the puppy does not know that the garage is his home. Puppies (and most dogs unless there is a medical condition) will instinctively go to the bathroom away from where they eat or sleep. A garage is large enough that it is rather simple for the dog to move to the other side and go. Until the dog is fully trained, constant vigilance is required. You need to watch the dog so that you can pick up her signals for when she is about to go to the bathroom.

When you see these signals, you take her outside to the spot where you want her to go, and then wait. She will eventually go. When she goes, praise praise praise and give her a treat. Eventually she will learn that going outside is a good thing. Then you have to teach her that the dog-door is a good thing as well. I have never had one, so I don't know how you would go about training for that.
An important point to note (and I am not saying you are doing this, but it is fairly common, so I thoughht I would be safe) is that if you make a mistake and don't watch her close enough and she goes in the garage, do not yell at her. That may cause her to do any number of things which are counter to what you want. If she accidentally goes in the garage, it is because you have not watched her close enough to catch the warning signals.

Marcel and Moogli
Thank you for you advice.

What you maybe don't understand yet is that your dog, living in the garage, is too isolated from you to learn to be a Good Dog.
Dogs are very social animals. They want and need to belong to a group - a pack. That pack can consist of other dogs; livestock (for livestock guardian dogs); or people.
But a dog relegated to living alone, between outdoors and a garage, is way too isolated from its pack - you and your family - to be happy or a good dog. That is, unless you folks spend a heck of a lot of time in the garage, use it as your family room year-round, etc.

Look, there's a truism wrt dogs: You can make a yard dog into a house dog, but you can't make a house dog into a yard dog.
And that's because for a dog to be happy, it has needs. One of those needs is to NOT BE ALONE.
You and your family, on the other side of a wall,
mostly leaving the dog alone, are NOT meeting its needs.

Why the hell did you get a dog?
flick 100785
My family got a lab/german sheppard puppy for Christmas, it is agreat dog. 9 weeks old today, and weighs 16 ... knows how to use it well. My question, how do I stop her from using the bathroom in thegarage? Help

Your puppy is nine weeks old the equivilant of a toddler or young child so she needs to be taught to go in the yard so supervise her and not leave her alone for long periods. Take her outside at regular intervals, at least very two hours and praise her when she wees or poos and ingore any accidents she has in the garage . Take her out first thing and after every meal and last thing at night. The problem is if you leave her in the garage, she can't tell you she needs to go out, pups have small immature bladders and can't hold it for long. She really needs to be inside your house and learn how to be part of the family otherwise you could end up with a hard to handle and anti- social dog.
Alison
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