I use a 75' tether run for our Boxer when she is outside that runs between two trees. I can see her from my office so she isn't totally unsupervised. Our yard is impractical to fence so the run works great for the times she wants to be outside but we can't be with her. What I would like to do is create a longer run but can't figure out how the pulley would transfer from one line to the other smoothly. Longer than 75' and I start having a problem with keeping the line tension. I thought I had seen something that created an angle to transfer the pulley over but can't find anything on a Google search.
Any suggestions are welcome!
Fran
I use a 75' tether run for our Boxer when she is outside that runs between two trees. I can ... fence so the run works great for the times she wants to be outside but we can't be with her.

Fran, are you sure it's the dog who wants to be outside?

Most Boxers I've known prefer to be at their owner's side.
What I would like to do is create a longer run but can't figure out how the pulley would transfer from one line to the other smoothly. Longer than 75' and I start having a problem with keeping the line tension.

If I were you, I'd be very* happy with 75', which is more then long enough for short periods of time. And you should *ideally only leave her out there for short periods of time.
Otherwise, you could be asking for trouble, depending on your particular neighborhood situation, etc.
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Handsome Jack Morrison
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No worries Jack! She's only outside on nice days for a couple of hours. Her run is within full view of my office. We live on a small farm and spend a lot of time, around 4 hours daily, outside together doing chores. She's happy inside with me as well but she isn't going to just snooze the whole day, she's an active curious puppy who enjoys seeing what is going on everywhere! She loves to go out and play with her ball or just gallop up and down the line.

With my door open she can come right up to the doorway and check on me before bounding off to play some more or just snooze in the sunshine. She can see me at all times because my office is a sunroom with windows for walls on 3 sides. She has a harness, not a neck collar. She's never out in inclement weather. This is just an alternative to a fenced yard IMO. Or I could keep her in her crate for the couple of hours while I concentrate on getting some work done.

But I think she enjoys being outside playing more. I do understand your concerns about tethering. I'll make sure it doesn't get to be over the top and abusive.

Fran
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If I were you, I'd be very happy with 75', ... trouble, depending on your particular neighborhood situation, etc. http://www.paw-rescue.org/PAW/PETTIPS/DogTip Chaining.php

No worries Jack! She's only outside on nice days for a couple of hours. Her run is within full view of my office. We live on a small farm and spend a lot of time, around 4 hours daily, outside together doing chores.

That's good news, Fran.
But doesn't she get worn out after doing all those chores? Emotion: smile
I do understand your concerns about tethering. I'll make sure it doesn't get to be over the top and abusive.

I'm sure you won't, Fran.
But if it gets to be a habit, you, and the dog, would probably be better off with a small, fenced-in area than a tether. Plus, you can eventually boundary-train your pup, too (after you've trained her to have a bullet-proof recall)
And thanks for the feedback!
Good luck with your new pup!

Handsome Jack Morrison
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But doesn't she get worn out after doing all those chores? Emotion: smile

I haven't yet taught her to muck stalls though she's good at scouting and clearing pine cones that might jump out at me and whatever horse I'm leading at the moment. She tricked me into thinking she would take care of feeding the cats for me. I didn't realize that taste testing was part of the job so she got fired from that one. Emotion: smile She's also good at "helping" to spread out hay. I throw out the flake and she tears into it and scatters it for about
10 feet! She's pretty tired for an hour or so when we come in then it'sback to "play with me...play with me..play with me!"
Plus, you can eventually boundary-train your pup, too (after you've trained her to have a bullet-proof recall)

Her recall is getting better but not bullet-proof and here in the almost-country of suburban Atlanta, bullet proof is exactly what I want her to be! Strays are shot around here, collar or no. She will stay with me the whole time I'm outside. When I can't be with her, she has wandered over to the neighbors to visit which worries me. She constantly wants to go out and keep the "eeevil squirrels in line.." Then the recall proves not to be so reliable!
How do you boundary train? Is it just a recall at a certain point on the property every time? We do that, and provided we look more interesting than the distraction, ie treats galore, she will come back. She's excellent when we are with her. I couldn't garuntee she wouldn't wander over to the neighbors if we weren't right there calling her and waving treats though. She's 8 mo if that determines training methods. We've done the basic obedience class and she did very well.
And thanks for the feedback! Good luck with your new pup!

Thank you! Emotion: smile
Fran
Plus, you can eventually boundary-train your pup, too (after you've trained her to have a bullet-proof recall)

Her recall is getting better but not bullet-proof and here in the almost-country of suburban Atlanta, bullet proof is exactly ... to go out and keep the "eeevil squirrels in line.." Then the recall proves not to be so reliable!

The recall is the most important command your dog will ever learn, so keep at it. It could save your dog's life one day.

Plus, you just can't allow her to "wander over to the neighbors to visit," because it'll soon become a habit.
You sound like you could use some help. Have you ever had your pup to an OBEDIENCE TRAINING class?
If not, you really should do that.
How do you boundary train? Is it just a recall at a certain point on the property every time?

Not quite. You've probably heard about those "invisible" fences that people use to contain their dogs? The dog wears an electronic collar, and when he gets too close to the buried cable (which establishes the dog's "boundary") he receives a stimulation, etc. Well, using only a leash and a 30' check cord, you can get pretty much the same results. In a nutshell, you walk the boundary with your dog (the boundary should be clearly marked with flags) and correct him (verbally and physically, using the leash) when he gets too close to the imaginary line that represents the boundary, and reward him when he correctly turns away.
After you've done this for a week, and your dog seems to be getting the idea, attach the check cord to his collar and let him drag it around. Now, for about another week (for the 1-2 two hours a day you leave him out there), just stand around inside the boundary, and let your dog do his thing. When he gets too close to the boundary, verbally correct him ("No, not there!" or something to that effect), then verbally praise him when he turns away.
That's the simplified version, but you get the general idea.

Also, you should never allow the dog to leave the property, even when on a leash and accompanied by you, by crossing through your imaginary boundary. Call or bring him inside, and then take him for walk, outside, etc., by going through the front or side of the house, etc.
Eventually, you should be able to just sit there on your porch, or in a window, etc., and he will stay within that imaginary boundary.

Yes, you should still always keep an eye on him, and he should also have a bullet-proof recall just in case.
Good luck with your pup!

Handsome Jack Morrison
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The recall is the most important command your dog will ever learn, so keep at it. It could save your ... habit. You sound like you could use some help. Have you ever had your pup to an OBEDIENCE TRAINING class?

Yes, we did the Beginner Obedience Training. We passed with flying colors. Her recall is getting better and is 100% when on the long line. But off-leash, it depends on the distraction.
How do you boundary train? Is it just a recall at a certain point on the property every time?

Not quite. You've probably heard about those "invisible" fences that people use to contain their dogs? The dog wears an ... he gets too close to the imaginary line that represents the boundary, and reward him when he correctly turns away.

I have horse fence around 90% of the property so that would be our boundary. Her recall is good as long as someone is out there with her, even off the long line.
After you've done this for a week, and your dog seems to be getting the idea, attach the check cord ... boundary, verbally correct him ("No, not there!" or something to that effect), then verbally praise him when he turns away.

This is what we are doing sans long line. I will try leaving it attached as a reminder though, good hint. We work on this during our morning barn chores. She isn't watched 100% but she is in and out of the barn constantly, checking on ME, so I know she can't have gone far. If she's gone longer than about 5 min I call her and she usually comes running from somewhere close on the property. She gets a treat for coming of course! One side of the property has electric fence for cows and she has hit that once. Now she stays far from that side of the property!
That's the simplified version, but you get the general idea. Also, you should never allow the dog to leave the ... eye on him, and he should also have a bullet-proof recall just in case. Good luck with your pup!

Thanks Jack! Good advice!
Fran