Hi everyone, I have two questions for ye.
First, my fiance's dog (a dachsund mix) has been used to sleeping with her since it was a pup. I mean, sleeping on the bed and having her run. Well, when we get married, that dog ain't coming anywhere near the bedroom, and she agrees Emotion: smile So, the question is, how do I get the dog used to sleeping somewhere else? It's barely a year old. We won't have a yard for a while, so it'll have to be another room in the home.

Second question, when we hug goodbye, even for just 5 seconds, that dog goes NUTS. Barking, whimpering, jumping up on us, etc. It freaks out. How do I make it stop that annoying behavior??
Thanks!
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First, my fiance's dog (a dachsund mix) has been used to sleeping with her since it was a pup. I ... year old. We won't have a yard for a while, so it'll have to be another room in the home.

This may be very difficult to do. Dogs really like feeling like they are part of the pack, which means their humans. Could either of you tolerate it if she slept in the room in a crate? That could be a good compromise. Your fiancee should start crating her now, so she is used to it before the upheaval of moving to a new place/having a new person always there. And she doesn't have to have access to the bedroom during the day, just shut the door to keep her out.
If that compromise won't work, I would also suggest your fiancee to start crating her, get her used to sleeping in the crate, then move the crate out of the bedroom in stages. After she's used to the crate, move the crate to the bedroom door, so she can see in but not be actually in the room. Once she's ok with that, move her further out.

The problem is that she may be horribly upset at not being able to sleep with her "pack", and may be very noisy and complain if she's not in the same room.
Second question, when we hug goodbye, even for just 5 seconds, that dog goes NUTS. Barking, whimpering, jumping up on us, etc. It freaks out. How do I make it stop that annoying behavior??[/nq]My old cocker does this. For him, it's jealousy/feeling ignored. He's essentially saying "Hey! Pay attention to me too!". He also barks (no more jumping, his old bones can't handle it, though he'll put his front feet on you) when the other dogs push him away for greeting people when they come in the house. "Hey! Just because I'm old and can't compete doesn't mean I don't deserve my share of homecoming attention". Two things that we do that have worked.

We say "No" (well, in his case, it's no and a sign, because he's deaf) and then we ignore him. When he's quiet, we reward him with attention. Your dog may just be able to stay quiet for a few seconds, but if you can reward during those few seconds, the dog will quickly learn that she has to be quiet to get attention. Using a clicker can help with this behavior. When she's quiet, immediately click and reward with affection. When our dog was younger, we would just say No and he'd stop, but he was really easy going.

Now that he has started with "old dog behavior" we've had to change how we deal with him (the NO, ignore until quiet and then reward works really well for him).
As your dog starts to realize that she isn't being left out and will get her attention after you two hug/kiss, she'll stay quiet for longer periods of time and you can lengthen the time that you need to click for. That is, you start hugging, she stays quiet now for 15 seconds, you click right before the limit and reward. In a few days or so, she stays quiet for 20 seconds, you click right before 20 seconds and reward.

natalie

The turtle lives twixt plated decks
Which practically conceal its sex.
I think it clever of the turtle
In such a fix to be so fertile.
Ogden Nash
If that compromise won't work, I would also suggest your fiancee to start

crating her, get her used to sleeping in the crate, then move the crate out of the bedroom in stages. ... she can see in but not be actually in the room. Once she's ok with that, move her further out.

Covering the crate may help - hopefully she'll begin to associate the crate as her room, and not be so worried about its actual location. It seems to have worked for us.
Diana
Second question, when we hug goodbye, even for just 5 seconds, that dog goes NUTS. Barking, whimpering, jumping up on us, etc. It freaks out. How do I make it stop that annoying behavior??

The dog is not an "it." He or she is a thinking, feeling, emotional creature.
Canine Action Dog Trainer
http://www.canineaction.com
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Hi everyone, I have two questions for ye. First, my fiance's dog (a dachsund mix) has been used to sleeping ... year old. We won't have a yard for a while, so it'll have to be another room in the home.

So you obviously dislike this dog intensely, and want to pitch it out if possible, and if not keep it as far away as possible?

Have your fiance start crate training the dog there are all kinds of good resources. But I'd also suggest you think about developing a relationship and bond with the dog. If you want a happy marriage, this will help everything a lot you need to be willing to give a little to get a little.
Second question, when we hug goodbye, even for just 5 seconds, that dog goes NUTS. Barking, whimpering, jumping up on us, etc. It freaks out. How do I make it stop that annoying behavior??

It? Is it a male or female? Obviously this is poor behavior, but it may be related to your seeming overall hostile thoughts. If you develop a relationship with the dog too, things should settle down. I'd recommend both of you taking a training class with the dog, with you actually working the dog.
First, my fiance's dog (a dachsund mix) has been used to sleeping with her since it was a pup. I ... year old. We won't have a yard for a while, so it'll have to be another room in the home.

If you had a yard would you have just put the dog outside? Once you do have a yard is that your plan for it? Just curious, because thats how it sounds. I'm don't even remotely like the idea of "outside dogs", but there are certain breeds that simply can not live outside. Breeds with very short fine haircoats top that list. Even in mild climates where it doesn't get so cold that the temperature can hurt them they can get sunburn/insect bites etc.
Well, when we get married, that dog ain't coming anywhere near the bedroom, and she agrees Emotion: smile

If Rich's fiance is reading these responses, please PLEASE think about spending the rest of your life with this man. If his attitude toward your dog hasn't set off any warning bells for you, perhaps you could learn from the experiences of many of us on this group :
Men who adore our pets tend to make good husbands and fathers. "Love me, love my dog" - IOW, be kind and generous, willing to give unconditional love and appreciate it in return, not jealous or controlling, and cherish me for the person I am.
Men who cannot bear to share our affections with a beloved animal companion, especially when they come off as jealous and resentful of "it", well, let's just say these men are likely to have more problems in the bedroom than whether or not a harmless little dog sleeps there.
;-) HTH!
Susan Fraser, owned and trained by
BeBop a Lu SheBop SH, Shamma Lamma Ding Dong MH,
Semper Choo Choo Ch'Boogie, and Gris Gris Gumbo Ya Ya http://mypeoplepc.com/members/chinchuba/AuH2OK9s /
If Rich's fiance is reading these responses, please PLEASE think aboutspending the rest of your life with this man. If ... off any warning bells for you, perhaps you could learn from theexperiences of many of us on this group :

He does say that she agrees to keep the dog out of the bedroom. I hope she truly does. As much as most of us enjoy having our dogs in the bed and at least in the bedroom with us, the important thing here is that they both really do agree and the dog makes the adjustment.
These situations always make me think of DH's sister's last marriage. Not dogs, but her cats were a very important part of her life. She married a man who refused to allow them in the house. No allergies, he just didn't like them. They lived in the garage and the cellar, not in their living areas. The marriage didn't work, of course.
I keep telling DD to remember this in her own relationships - that it's not so much a matter of the cats per se. It's that something THAT important to her was not also important to him, at least on some level. And that they could not find a compromise - say keep the cats out of the bedroom, not replace them as they age, etc.

~~Judy
"Dogs are not our whole life, but
they make our lives whole." Roger Caras
Holy crap. Talk about blowing something way out of proportion. This supposedly horrible man is here asking for advice on how to achieve the agreed upon (between him and his fiance in case you missed that). He sought out this newsgroup and why? People who hate dogs, don't care about dogs, want a certain dog gone, or aren't interested in learning will not come to a dog behavior newsgroup and ask for advice. He's doing a hell of alot more than most signicant others do. If you and Robin think that not wanting a dog in the bed, or in the room, is so horrible then sign me up for your dog-hater list. Given this dog's behavior when these two people try to embrace its absolutely no wonder the dog won't be wanted in the bedroom.

Tara
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