I've been trying to walk my two year-old lab mix, Bo, as often as I can to keep him (and me) exercised. Bo isn't in the greatest shape at the moment, and is usually a slobbery, panting mess about 15-20 minutes into the walk. The trail we walk has several little doggie faucets along the way, so naturally I want to stop and make sure Bo has plenty of water to keep him hydrated as we walk. I'm concerned, though, because Bo seems to get so excited about just being on the damn walk that he won't take a drink of water. At all. Not even if I put water down in front of him. As soon as we're home, he makes a beeline for his water bowl. Should I be worried about this?

Dave
I've been trying to walk my two year-old lab mix, Bo, as often as I can to keep him (and ... him. As soon as we're home, he makes a beeline for his water bowl. Should I be worried about this?

Nope. He probably just doesn't want to drink out of a public faucet, with everything that's going around these days.
Emotion: wink
Be more concerned that, at the still tender age of two, your dog "isn't in the greatest shape," and do something about *that.*

Hint:
More exercise, less food.
Exercise = retrieving, not walking.

Handsome Jack Morrison
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The trail we walk has several little doggie faucets along the way, so naturally I want to stop and make ... As soon as we're home, he makes a beeline for his water bowl. Should I be worried about this? Dave

Yes, maybe. Dogs are sometimes not wise enough to keep themselves hydrated when they are excited and distracted. If it is really hot, the dog is out of shape and overweight, I would stop at the faucet (and carry my own collapsible bowl), and wait until he drinks before proceeding at at least one of the stations.

I have a dog that is so driven she will go til she drops. It is not extremely uncommon with field retrievers to see them work til they drop from heat exhaustion, so monitor him carefully.
I have a dog that is so driven she will go til she drops. It is not extremely uncommon with field retrievers to see them work til they drop from heat exhaustion, so monitor him carefully.

Just a hunch, but I doubt his pooch is a field-trial retriever.

And it's also been my experience that, like with horses, you can lead a dog to water but you can't make him drink (until he wants to).

If the OP will just get his dog into better shape, I think the "problem" here will essentially go away.

Handsome Jack Morrison
*gently remove the detonator to reply via e-mail
I've been trying to walk my two year-old lab mix, Bo, as often as I can to keep him (and ... him. As soon as we're home, he makes a beeline for his water bowl. Should I be worried about this?

Dylan would also refuse water on walks in the heat. But she would attack lawn sprinklers and bite at the stream of water. This gave me the idea to use a water bottle with a "sports" (popup) top, so I could squeeze a stream of water in her direction. She didn't think this was nearly as much fun as a sprinkler, but I did manage to get her to drink when no one had their sprinklers turned on.
Maybe this would work with Bo?
FurPaw

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