I have a problem. My daughter Delayna is four and is our only child. Last year she wanted a dog and we went to the humane society and got her a 1 year old Bassett hound. The doggy is a bad boy. He jumps up and knocks her over. She has gotten to the point that she doesn't really like to play with him because he plays much too rough. I took him to obedience classes but with both of us working, he learned very little. Even the teacher said, he will probably only learn one thing, I think he frustrated her too.

He has recently taken up going pee in the house- that's new. We can not let him in any rooms except the ones we dog proofed because he constantly chews. I have told my daughter maybe the doggy would be better living with a family that had more time and she got mad. I don't feel it is fair to the dog that I have to lock him up all the time but he just plays too rough, Of course I have my sanity to think of but also the health and happiness of my dog too and I do not want my daughter to hate me.

I want to give him away and I have a way to do that but how to keep her from hating me. Am I asking to have my cake and eat it too? She wont notice for days if I send him away because she rarely goes near him. Any advice? I am trying not to lie but a white lie will work.

Shayla G
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I have a problem. My daughter Delayna is four and is our only child. Last year she wanted a dog and we went to the humane society and got her a 1 year old Bassett hound. The doggy is a bad boy.

what made you choose a Bassett Hound? What qualities were you looking for? What level of ownership does a 4 year old have?
He jumps up and knocks her over. She has gotten to the point that she doesn't really like to play with him because he plays much too rough.

HOW does she play with him and are you supervising every second? What are you doing about it?
I took him to obedience classes but with both of us working, he learned very little.

?? Obedience training is a fairly small time commitment when you work it in to daily life. Have you continued training at home?
He has recently taken up going pee in the house- that's new. We can not let him in any rooms except the ones we dog proofed because he constantly chews.

What are you DOING about it? Supervision? Teaching him what's off limits? Housebreaking him?
I have told my daughter maybe the doggy would be better living with a family that had more time and ... because she rarely goes near him. Any advice? I am trying not to lie but a white lie will work.

You're the grown up. Make a grown up decision. You don't have time for a dog and getting one because a toddler wants one just doesn't make sense. Place him with Bassett rescue and don't get another dog until your daughter is MUCH older and can take part in the training and care of the dog, if then.

Janet Boss
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
I have a problem. My daughter Delayna is four and is our only child. Last year she wanted a dog ... because she rarely goes near him. Any advice? I am trying not to lie but a white lie will work.

Either go with what you told your daughter, "the doggy would be better living with a family that had more time," and just let your daughter get "mad" at you.
Or get with the program, your daughter included, and make a total commitment to properly TRAIN your dog.
You've made a commitment to raise your child properly, right?

The same should go for your dog.
Kids get "mad" at their parents all the time. It's part of being a kid. But they get over it, and pretty quickly, too, unless they're known as the Menendez brothers.
Heh.
Part of the job of being a good parent is knowing when to say no, and knowing when to cut bait.
You don't really sound like you're in a position to make that total commitment yet, so option one is probably your best bet.

But good luck with whatever decision you do make!

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Go ahead. I dare you not to laugh!
x3Rw
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I want to give him away and I have a way to do that but how to keep her from ... because she rarely goes near him. Any advice? I am trying not to lie but a white lie will work.

This isn't a parenting group, so it's unlikely that you will find advice here on how to tell your daughter that you are dumping the dog. And, really, you know your daughter best, so I assume you are the best qualified person to figure out what to tell her. Better, at least, than a bunch of total strangers.

Shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net (the Mother Ship)
http://esther.cat-sidh.net (Letters to Esther)
I have a problem. My daughter Delayna is four and is our only child. Last year she wanted a dog ... rarely goes near him. Any advice? I am trying not to lie but a white lie will work. Shayla G==[/nq]Do you exercise the dog twice a day for about 40 minutes each time? The dog will be much better behaved and more content, if you walk the dog in the morning, let him go out in the yard during the day and walk the dog again in the evening for another 40 minutes. He will be out enough that he won't have to pee in the house and will be too tired to get into trouble. Every time he pees and poops outdoors, praise him a lot. After my dog has her morning walk and run in the forest, she is quiet for the rest of the day.

When they don't get enough exercise, dogs tend to cause problems. If you are unable to walk your dog or have someone else walk the dog every day, or practice with the training on a daily basis, then I would suggest doing a search for a Basset Hound Rescue Group on line, and ask if they will take him; he would better off going with a group that knows and cares about Bassets than dumping him with a place that does not. Most Rescue groups try to insure their dogs find good homes.

Unless the dog gets some exercise, training and attention, he won't be able to calm down enough for your little girl to accept him. It is up to you to take the time to do this for your dog and little girl.
After my dog has her morning walk and run in the forest, she is quiet for the rest of the day. When they don't get enough exercise, dogs tend to cause problems.

And sometimes, when they do not get enough regular exercise, they lie around the house like lumpy potatoes.

Shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net (the Mother Ship)
http://esther.cat-sidh.net (Letters to Esther)
The dog will be much better behaved and more content, if you walk the dog in the morning, let him ... out enough that he won't have to pee in the house and will be too tired to get into trouble.

Um, nope.
Look, exercising the dog is always a great idea, and while it sets up a better circumstance for training it is not the same thing as training and is not a substitute for training. Walking the dog will not teach the dog not to jump up on a little girl. It will not teach the dog not to pee in the house. And unless the person doing the walking turns the walk into a training exercise, walking the dog will probably not even teach the dog to pay attention to the human.

Also, as a dog becomes more fit its energy level will go up, not down. I have never seen this fail to be the case - not with dogs, not with horses, and not with humans. Stress and adaptation. This is basic physiology.

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Prouder than ever to be a member of the reality-based community
Look, exercising the dog is always a great idea, and while it sets up a better circumstance for training it ... a substitute for training. Walking the dog will not teach the dog not to jump up on a little girl.

But Cesar said it would!
Also, as a dog becomes more fit its energy level will go up, not down. I have never seen this fail to be the case - not with dogs, not with horses, and not with humans. Stress and adaptation. This is basic physiology.

To be fair, an out-of-shape dog might be worn out by a 40 minute walk. That still doesn't address the OP's training issue, but it might explain Teh Pfoley Phenomenon.

Shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net (the Mother Ship)
http://esther.cat-sidh.net (Letters to Esther)
To be fair, an out-of-shape dog might be worn out by a 40 minute walk.

That's a temporary situation. The dog will respond to regular walking by becoming fitter, and its energy level will go up. To tire it out every time you need to walk it longer than the level to which it's adapted. That becomes a vicious cycle, and eventually a dog will be able to walk for longer without tiring than the human has the time or patience for. It is not a long-term management strategy.

You walk the dog because it's great for the dog's health (and yours), both physical and mental. If you're walking the dog as a substitute for training, well, you're in for some surprises. Or frustration. Or both.
Pfoley has posted a lot about exercise (Hail Cesar!) but I have a hard time understanding what he's saying because it tends to contradict both what we know about adaptations to exercise and my experience exercising dogs. The only explanations I can come up with for his experience are 1) he's not exercising his dogs consistently, or 2) he's not describing what he's actually seeing, but rather what Cesar told him that he should be seeing.

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Prouder than ever to be a member of the reality-based community
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