If a cat who will only eat dry food (good quality food) also drinks at the same time, ie eats some then drinks, then eats more, then drinks... isn't that close to the same as eating wet food, as far as their body knows? I've observed this with Bonnie and she even dribbles dry food into the water while she eats/drinks.

Cheryl
"I am only one, but still I am one. I cannot do everything, but still I can do something. I will not refuse to do the something I can do." - Helen Keller
Worldwide Candle Lighting in Memory of all Children, Dec 14, 2003 7pm in all time zones
http://thecompassionatefriends.org/2003 WWCL/2003 wcl.htm WWCL/senres.htm

this in memory of my Eric
1 2
If a cat who will only eat dry food (good quality food) also drinks at the same time, ie eats ... their body knows? I've observed this with Bonnie and she even dribbles dry food into the water while she eats/drinks.

I have read that it isn't quite the same as far as the body is concerned but I'm still not convinced as water intake is water intake no matter where it comes from.
As for what I've read... the theory was that cats who eat wet food satisify most of their moisture requirements with the food and that most of this moisture is excreted as urine rather than moisture in the ***.

On the other hand, cats who consume dry food are the opposite. They need to drink to satisfy the moisture requirement, some may not drink enough. The moisture is excreted more in the *** than it is in the urine.

I don't understand any more about it than this. I have observed a different behavior in my own cat who consumes dry. She will settle down for a meal of dry and then sometime afterwards will have a drink. She drinks quite a lot during the day. The size of the clumps in the litter box are evidence of that.
To me, ingestion of water no matter what the source results in the same thing. I cannot see how there is what would amount to a water traffic copy that would direct water that comes in the food more into the urine and water from drinking into the urine. I would think the body deals with water the same no matter where it comes from.

But then what do I know? I'm just a former trucker... former computer guy... now working on developing yet another career. :-)

"Its the bugs that keep it running."
-Joe Canuck
on
13 Dec 2003:
I have read that it isn't quite the same as far as the body is concerned but I'm still not convinced as water intake is water intake no matter where it comes from.

I've read that, too. I do know that when Shadow ate all canned food, he rarely drank water. Shamrock eats mainly canned food now and rarely drinks which sucks because after his dental, the vet said to put an enzyme into his drinking water to help break down plaque.
As for what I've read... the theory was that cats who eat wet food satisify most of their moisture requirements ... requirement, some may not drink enough. The moisture is excreted more in the *** than it is in the urine.

This is the part that scares me. She's already had a bout of UTI and I do know it is important to get her peeing more. Her pee balls are kind of small; I can tell the difference between hers and Shamrock (who pees like a race horse). Then again it's hard to distinguish any of their litter box doings sometimes with Shadow coming in and spraying diarrhea all over the box. We go through a lot of litter. lol
I don't understand any more about it than this. I have observed a different behavior in my own cat who ... drinks quite a lot during the day. The size of the clumps in the litter box are evidence of that.

That's great to read.

Cheryl
"I am only one, but still I am one. I cannot do everything, but still I can do something. I will not refuse to do the something I can do." - Helen Keller
Worldwide Candle Lighting in Memory of all Children, Dec 14, 2003 7pm in all time zones
http://thecompassionatefriends.org/2003 WWCL/2003 wcl.htm http://thecompassionatefriends.org/2003 WWCL/senres.htm

this in memory of my Eric
on 13 Dec 2003:

I tried putting ice cubes in the Drinkwell for the first time yesterday. I think she enjoyed the cold drink more than the entertainment of the ice cubes floating around in the pool.
At one time I had two cats and it was my experience they both started drinking more with the introduction of the fountain.

"Its the bugs that keep it running."
-Joe Canuck
circa 13 Dec 2003 21:51:30 GMT, in rec.pets.cats.health+behav, Cheryl (Email Removed) said,
I've read that, too. I do know that when Shadow ate all canned food, he rarely drank water. Shamrock eats ... because after his dental, the vet said to put an enzyme into his drinking water to help break down plaque.

Can't you put the enzyme into his food?
Laura

I am Dyslexia of Borg,
Your ass will be laminated.
If a cat who will only eat dry food (good quality food) also drinks at the same time, ie eats some then drinks, then eats more, then drinks... isn't that close to the same as eating wet food, as far as their body knows?

Not as far as total water intake and water turnover are concerned. Cats fed dry food drink about 6x more water than cats fed canned food, but their total water intake (from food and drinking) decreases when they're fed dry food only. Specifically, when fed dry food, the total water to dry matter intake ratio (TH20/DM) varies from 2.0 to 2.8: 1 whereas on canned foods it varies from 3. 0 to 5.7: 1 150% to 200% higher when fed canned food with a moisture content of 75% or more. There have been >20 years of studies that have confirmed and reconfirmed this fact.
The reason why cats become dehydrated so easily and quickly is because they have a somewhat weak thirst drive - which they inherited from their desert-dwelling ancestors - who evolved obtaining most (>90%) of their total water requirement from their food (prey). As a consequence, they never developed a strong thirst drive and therefore can't make rapid and precise changes in their water intake to compensate for changes in their hydration status.
The higher water intake and water turnover achieved from canned food results in more frequent urination which is actually the first line of defense in preventing ascending infections of the urinary tract. Frequent urination inhibits bacterial colonization of the urinary tract by frequently washing out bacteria and organisms from the bladder and urethra with fresh, sterile urine. Another advantage of a higher water turnover and higher urine volume is distention of the bladder and urethra which stretches and opens mucosal folds and crevices where bacteria can become trapped.

The higher urine volume also dilutes the concentration of potentially calculogenic solutes and crystalloids the frequent urination flushes the solutes from the urinary tract before they can grow large enough to cause a problem.
So as you can see, there's a little more to it.
Phil
I too have read that water consumed with dry food tends to go more to the *** than to urine. Canned food tends to go to urine. If your cat hasn't been blocked, I don't think you need to be concerned about this. But in my cat's case, he was on a high-quality natural dry-food diet, and he drank lots of water. He pooped more than he does now, but he blocked. He's also quite sedentary since he's become an indoor cat, and I am nearly certain that is part of the equation as he is overweight. Emotion: smile
ava
another fact: a cat uses (loses) water in grooming; about as much as it loses in urine.
on 13 Dec 2003:
I've read that, too. I do know that when Shadow ... enzyme into his drinking water to help break down plaque.

Can't you put the enzyme into his food? Laura

I'll have to ask; I don't see why not. Thanks! Emotion: smile The other option on the bottle says to spray a fine mist directly into the mouth. Not sure he'll let me do that but I'll work on it.

Cheryl
"I am only one, but still I am one. I cannot do everything, but still I can do something. I will not refuse to do the something I can do." - Helen Keller
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