Eight weeks ago, I took possession of two Dumerils. A male and a female, both 2 years old. The previous owner had been feeding them live medium size rats every two weeks in separate dark feeding boxes. They lived in a 50 gal aquarium which I now have. The aquarium is set up with a with a water tub, a heating mat, climbing branches and newspaper for bedding. They were both fed just before I got them. I wanted to switch them to frozen/thawed rats.

Two weeks after getting them, I placed each of them in their own box with a f/t rat. The female quickly ate but the male did not. I left the male with the rat for a couple hours and he never ate the rat. Two weeks later, same thing, female ate and male did not. This has now happen 2 more times. The male has not eaten in 8 weeks. Should I go back to live rats or continue trying f/t rats every two weeks? I'm starting to get worried.

Thanks,
Gary
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Do you have the temps were they're supposed to be? Is there much activity where you feed the snake? How long are you leaving the rat in the feed box? How are you thawing the rat? If you are soaking the rat in water, are you drying the rat before you give it to the snake? Are you getting the rat up to a warm temperature or are you just thawing it? These are most of the questions I can think of right now. Lets see what your answers are and that will give me more information to help further!
Good Luck!
Jim Smith

Blaming a gun for murder is like blaming a car for hit and run.
There are several tricks to help induce the male to feed. After making sure the snake is otherwise healthy, proceed with the following in the order specified:
1. Heat the f/t rat with an incandescent bulb. Don't, for god's sake usethe microwave. Offer it to the snake.
2. Separate the female into her feeding box but leave the male in theenclosure. Offer food to the male.
3. Wiggle the rat in front of the male's nose. Be careful doing this anduse tongs. It's possible to freak out a non-feeding snake with this method.
4. Separate the male and female into separate enclosures. Cover themale's enclosure for a few days to a week. Offer food to the male but disturb it as little as possible.
5. Withhold water from the snake for five days. Thaw a frozen rat invery warm water. Offer it to the male.
6. Offer the snake a freshly-killed rat, still twitching if possible.

If all else fails, wait him out. Boids go for extremely long periods without feeding. My female common boa routinely stops feeding for 6-8 months when breeding. 2 months is not a long time for a snake to fast.

Cheers,
Kurt Schatzl
http://www.neherp.com
Massachusetts, USA
If all else fails, wait him out. Boids go for extremely long periods without feeding. My female common boa routinely stops feeding for 6-8 months when breeding. 2 months is not a long time for a snake to fast.

Re-read the above statement!
Barring any medical/husbandry problems; this is the #1 concern of most reptile enthusiasts (especially in the case of snakes). I receive more phone calls and e-mails regarding this single question/concern/worry by almost 20:1 over all others.
Snakes can go for extended periods of time without food...and as long as it is the animal putting themselves on a restricted diet; in most cases the snake will again start to feed when the snake is ready.

Keep to your regular feeding routine, and when he is ready, he will indeed start to feed once again.
Good Luck!
~Wade
Eight weeks ago, I took possession of two Dumerils. A male and a female, both 2 years old. The previous ... go back to live rats or continue trying f/t rats every two weeks? I'm starting to get worried. Thanks, Gary

I have never raised Dumerils myself but from what i've read they l;ike to hide under the substrate when they are hunting in the wild. 8 weeks isn'ty that long for a healthy boa not to eat. Especially when changing to a new owner. My Red Tail quit eating for over 6 months when i moved Once. She didn't lose a lot of weight and finally did start eating again. Once i found a way she liked to be fed.
1. Heat the f/t rat with an incandescent bulb. Don't, for god's >sake use the microwave. Offer it to the ... male's nose. Be careful doing >this and use tongs. It's possible to freak out a non-feeding snake with >this method.

I combine these methods with Jasper the royal python. He (usually) grabs it within seconds
Should I go back to live rats or continue trying f/t rats every two weeks? I'm starting to get >worried. Thanks, Gary

Boids can go months without feeding. I think the record is over 2 years for a royal python.
As long as he has good weight on him, he should be fine.

Don't go back to feeding live, it was irresponsible of the previous owner to feed live in the first place.
It may be 'cool' to watch a snake subdue live prey and devour it, but it's risky to the snake. A rodent bite can cause serious injury, even death to a snake. I've heard of a rat biting a snake in the head, killing it instantly. There's a pic on the internet of a poor royal (ball) python that had been chewed on by a rodent, the snake had to be euthanised due to the severity of its injuries.
My Cher, who lives with "Cat"'s Sonny, I got because someone returned her to Don Soderberg who gave her to me. He'd sold 85 Emorii Rats to a man in NY he believed to be responsible, checked him out, he WAS, note past tense, then he 'got a girl' who hated snakes, but he fed live and now was too busy to oversee the eating process, which wouldn't even have guaranteed the safety of it. Fourteen snakes survived after a year of this.

Don got wind, despite occasional phonecalls that yielded the report of 'fine fine', when the hatchling return deal wasn't met. Don bought the survivors back, almost wept over the state the 'survivors' were in, gave me Cher, lovely girl but missing an eye from a ratbite. Tame wonderful snake. Nice and plump but didn't grow her back her eye.
Besides there's something about people who get off on hearing rodents scream.
I wouldn't feed anything but f/t.
Besides there's something about people who get off on hearing >rodents scream. I wouldn't feed anything but f/t.

Same here, I feed f/t. I care too much about Jasper and Jool to risk them being killed or seriously injured by their prey.
If I want to see a snake lunge at its prey I need look no further than Jasper. I have to do the "I'm really alive dance" to make him eat and he then spends up to five minutes coiled around his f/t mouse trying to 'kill it'
Besides live mice are cute and fluffy and warm to the touch, so I wouldn't feed them to a snake. It's different with f/t mice
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