I have two dogs and unfortunately one will be euthanized soon. I have heard it is best to allow the living dog see the euthanized one so he won't wonder what happened to him. Just wondering if anyone had any insight into this.
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I have two dogs and unfortunately one will be euthanized soon. I have heard it is best to allow the living dog see the euthanized one so he won't wonder what happened to him. Just wondering if anyone had any insight into this.

I think different people will have different things to say depending on what they've witnessed with their dogs. Having done rescue and had foster dogs live with me for anywhere from 2-8 months before being adopted I've seen one of my dogs display odd behavior and another that didn't bat an eyelash. The one would often go off food for a day or two, continually want to go outside and look around and would become a bit clingy. The other seemed not to care.
I recently had to have the dog who didn't seem to care euthanized and I chose to bring her home for burial and allow the other dog to see/sniff her dead body. She acted curious about the dead dog then walked off and laid down to watch us dig a hole. She still went off food (longer than normal but then this was her long-time housemate) and displayed separation anxiety-like behavior afterwards. This is a needy dog who doesn't like change. The other dog seemed immune to change and likely wouldn't have reacted similarly had the roles been reversed. It really just depends on the dog IMO.

Tara
I have two dogs and unfortunately one will be euthanized soon. I have heard it is best to allow the living dog see the euthanized one so he won't wonder what happened to him. Just wondering if anyone had any insight into this.

I chose to have my old girl of 14 put down in my home for a few reasons, one of which was so that the other dogs could have closure (I don't like that word, but it fits) if they needed it. Friday had only been here for 8 months, but Rocky had known Murphy for 5 years and it was she who had taught him dog stuff when he was a puppy, so they were pretty closely bonded.

Anyway, Murphy was put down and then I bought the other dogs in. Friday took a sniff and then went to say hello to the vet. Well-bonded (heh) Rocky ate the treat that Murphy didn't finish and then went to say hello to the vet. Not even a glance at her.
I think the procedure worked, though. Weeks later, I asked "Where's Murphy? Where's Murphy?!" and both dogs looked at me like I was nuts.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
It really just depends on the dog IMO.

i agree. i was surprised at how my dogs acted when echo-cat died. she died in the night, curled up against elliott's underside. i could tell she was dead, so i let the dogs out before making sure and hunting for something to bury her in. i let the dogs back inside before i wrapped her up. harriet, who is generally quite tweaky, didn't show any sign of being upset. elliott, who is Mr. Unflappable, approached echo, took a sniff, and jumped out of his skin. he seemed really freaked out by her, even though ten minutes previously he'd been curled up asleep around her. my guess is that he didn't notice that she'd died in the night. i'd really like to know what went through his head when he realized she was dead.

shelly
http://home.bluemarble.net/~scouvrette>> http://cat-sidh.blogspot.com

During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act.
George Orwell
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I have two dogs and unfortunately one will be euthanized soon. I have heard it is best to allow the living dog see the euthanized one so he won't wonder what happened to him. Just wondering if anyone had any insight into this.

I didn't let Reka see Danny post death, and 10 months later, she still is stressed when a dog in the household dissappears. She doesn't relax until they come back. Even if it's a foster transient dog, she is very uncomfortable when they don't come back. I have a *** here to breed to Danny, and I dread how she's going to take it when this girl goes back home.
I don't know if it would have helped or not, but I wish I had allowed her to see Danny after he was gone.
The one would often go off food for a day or two, continually want to go outside and look around and would become a bit clingy. The other seemed not to care.

That sounds like Pan and Khan. She's the sensitive kind, and he's a big lummox. I think that she would take Khan's absence quite hard, and while she goes to great pains to put on a macho act, you can tell that she is often quite lost without him.
If I can help it, both dogs will be euthanized at home. Despite my best efforts, both of them get stressed out at the vet, and I'd really rather they be made as comfortable as possible. This way, everyone will get to say their goodbyes before the vet takes the body back for cremation.

This has been an awfully difficult post to write.
Suja
If I can help it, both dogs will be euthanized at home. Despite my best efforts, both of them get stressed out at the vet, and I'd really rather they be made as comfortable as possible.

Finn's vet was willing to come over and euthanize him at home. This was such a blessing and made the process so much easier on him. It still helps to know how relaxed and calm he was for his last moments. He had his favoritist people feeding him hot dogs and cheese, he got to lay on his comfy bed and give Mommy kisses. He got to see Dr Bonnie without the stress of being frightened of what procedure he was going to have to go through next.
My cats turned their backs on the whole procedure. But that in itself was a clue that they understood something important was going on as they are usually friendly with people that visit, and that one time they were both huddled up and facing the wall. They only checked out the scene once Finn's body was gone. That, and a few days of being subdued was their only real outward adjustment.
This way, everyone will get to say their goodbyes before the vet takes the body back for cremation.

This helped me AND the boycats a lot, I think. I was too emotionally overloaded before and during the process to feel like I had really said my good-byes. It took awhile for the cremation people to come pick him up, so I made a lot of my peace with it after he was gone.
This has been an awfully difficult post to write.

Yeah. I'm not even sure mine made any sense.
I still miss him so much some days. And while BenCat has lasted longer than anyone thought after his cancer was diagnosed, the thought of losing him too gives me a worried knot in my chest.

Tara
Thanks for all the responses as they've been very helpful. I just spoke to our vet and asked the same question and she was against bringing in my other dog afterwards. Her reasoning was that it would make the other dog even more stressed about coming to the vet in the future which I guess makes sense especially since they both dread going to the vet as it is. If I had my way it would be done in the home but that's not an option as everyone else here is opposed to it. I'm still not sure what to do, but once again I appreciate the posts.
Her reasoning was that it would make the other
dog even more stressed about coming to the vet in the future which I guess makes sense especially since they both dread going to the vet as it is.

Are you bringing the other dog's body home, or having the vet dispose of it? I've always brought my dogs and cats home & let the other pets see them before burial.
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