WASHINGTON, Dec 24 (Reuters) - The Food and Drug Administration may tighten its ban on feeding cattle remains to other mammals as a way to prevent any more cases of mad cow disease, a senior agency official told Reuters on Wednesday.
Since 1997, the FDA, which regulates livestock feed, has banned feeding cattle remains to other cattle. But farmers are still allowed to feed pigs, chicken and household pets this material as a form of cheap protein in their diet.
Stephen Sundlof, director of FDA's Center for Veterinary Medicine, said the agency believes the Holstein cow in Washington state contracted mad cow disease after eating infected animal feed as a young animal.

The infected cow was believed to be born in 1999, two years after the FDA feed ban was in place.
"We will have to reassess in light of this case whether or not our feed rules are continuing to be adequate or if we need to change," Sundlof said in an interview.
Federal health officials are trying to track down all the farms, slaughterhouses, beef processing plants and renderers that handled material from the four-year-old dairy cow.
The FDA does not yet know what rendering plants received the central nervous tissue from the cow after its slaughter. "I haven't gotten any confirmation on who they are yet," Sundlof said.
Scientists believe mad cow disease is spread by the consumption of beef contaminated with diseased brain or spinal column material.

U.S. beef processing plants typically send renderers cattle parts that are unfit for food. This unwanted material can then be processed into a variety of other products, such as pet food and animal feed.

Once the renderer is pinpointed in the Washington state case, a voluntary recall may be necessary depending on what products the plant made, Sundlof said. "If we found that they were going into product that they weren't supposed to, obviously we would initiate a recall," he said.

If the renderer was using the infected material for such things as poultry feed, no recall would be necessary, Sundlof said. Scientists don't believe the disease can spread to poultry. 12/24/2003 01:25 p.m.CDT
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It's about time! Feeding cows animal products is insane. No wonder we now have mad cow disease.
Lauren

See my cats: http://community.webshots.com/album/56955940rWhxAe Raw Diet Info: http://www.holisticat.com/drjletter.html http://www.geocities.com/rawfeeders/ForCatsOnly.html Declawing Info: http://www.wholecat.com/articles/claws.htm
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Scientists don't believe the disease can spread to poultry.

And I don't believe the disease can spread to humans, either. Or for that matter, even spread from cow to cow.
And I'm really looking forward to those cheaper beef prices!

Beef. It's what's for dinner!
Yummy!

Handsome Jack Morrison
*gently remove the detonator to reply via e-mail
Luvya Dubya! Daniel Drezner http://www.georgewbush.com / http://www.danieldrezner.com/blog / Glenn Reynolds - InstaPundit Steven Den Beste http://www.instapundit.com / http://www.denbeste.nu / SpinSanity Andrew Sullivan http://www.spinsanity.org / http://www.andrewsullivan.com /
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Scientists don't believe the disease can spread to poultry.

And I don't believe the disease can spread to humans, either. Or for that matter, even spread from cow to cow. And I'm really looking forward to those cheaper beef prices! Beef. It's what's for dinner! Yummy!

Agreed. Unfortunately, we know several people involved in the beef industry (smaller time ranchers). And, being in Oregon (so close to WA), they will undoubtedly suffer. Just a few days prior to the news outbreak, my husband & friends were discussing how the Atkin's diet has seemed to help rejuvenate the beef market. Now... Makes me glad we raise our own, and have for years (and we know exactly what they eat!).
The wholesaler where I buy meat for the dogs is one of the places that rec'd some of the "potentially affected meat". I just buy poultry from them, and will continue to do so.
What I'm curious to see is how the Red Cross will handle this now, a whole new form to fill out when donating blood, yay! Shelly (Former Vegetarian turned back to Red-Meat) & The Boys
The wholesaler where I buy meat for the dogs is one of the places that rec'd some of the "potentially affected meat". I just buy poultry from them, and will continue to do so.

Unfortunately, if you eat store-bought meats and fish your risk for listeriosis is a lot higher than your risk for BSE, and with way-huge cutbacks in FDA inspections over the past few years the incidence of listeriosis is way, way, way up. I don't eat cold cuts anymore, but other than that my main concern is making sure the dogs eat good stuff. No more hot dog training treats, for example. The dog food we use claims to use organic meats. Maybe it's because of what I do for a living, but I figure it's prudent to mitigate the risks you can and not worry too much about the ones you can't.

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Jobs White House predicted would be created during first 5 months after last tax cuts: 1,530,000. Jobs created: 271,000
The wholesaler where I buy meat for the dogs is ... buy poultry from them, and will continue to do so.

Unfortunately, if you eat store-bought meats and fish your risk for listeriosis is a lot higher than your risk for BSE, and with way-huge cutbacks in FDA inspections over the past few years the incidence of listeriosis is way, way, way up.

Oh agreed! My husband actually refuses to eat chicken at all. Of course, the fact that his employer is across the street from an chicken grower/egg plant has a great deal to do with that.

I think that the usage of things like prepackaged "Kid Friendly" foods like small-sized hot dogs, Lunchables, and the like might have a great deal to do with the increase in listeriosis cases as well. Not to mention the fact that people seem to go to the doctor for just about everything nowadays, so the likelihood of it being recognized is greater, IMHO.
Having suffered from food poisoning twice now, I'm pretty careful about how/what I eat. Blech. Not fun stuff at all.
We use various forms of jerky, liver brownies (cooked, of course!) and string cheese for treats around here. I used to use hot dogs, but I don't eat them, and their greasiness in my pocket makes me ill. Shelly & The Boys
We use various forms of jerky, liver brownies (cooked, of course!) and string cheese for treats around here. I used to use hot dogs, but I don't eat them, and their greasiness in my pocket makes me ill.

There's that (greazy bait bags - yuck). Actually, my dogs love string cheese more than anything. They liked the hot dogs, but that string cheese really gets their attention even in the middle of relative chaos.

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Jobs White House predicted would be created during first 5 months after last tax cuts: 1,530,000. Jobs created: 271,000
We use various forms of jerky, liver brownies (cooked, of ... them, and their greasiness in my pocket makes me ill.

There's that (greazy bait bags - yuck). Actually, my dogs love string cheese more than anything. They liked the hot dogs, but that string cheese really gets their attention even in the middle of relative chaos.

Yes, the greasy bait bags are bad. Worse yet are the moldy treat bait bag (when I forget about the liver bait in the bottom of it, then have to undergo major cleaning to fix it). Of course, string cheese gets pretty soft in the summertime, so I have to mix it up a bit! I've taken beef baby food and baked little dollops of it on low heat for long periods of time for tiny bits and that always works. Personally, I like to use heart rather than liver. It stays together in the pocket or treat bag a bit better & is less messy. Boiled, with a bit of garlic salt is a huge hit. And very easy as well. Shelly & The Boys
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And I'm really looking forward to those cheaper beef prices! Beef. It's what's for dinner! Yummy!

Agreed. Unfortunately, we know several people involved in the beef industry (smaller time ranchers). And, being in Oregon (so close to WA), they will undoubtedly suffer.()

Yeah, I hate to see the ranchers suffer, but I'm going to really enjoy the lower beef prices in the short-term, until the panic subsides. And that could take up to a year or more.
I just hope we don't go over the cliff, like they did in the UK (mostly for Hoof-and-Mouth Disease), and hold mass slaughters of cattle numbering in the millions. That would also be a total waste of some perfectly edible, not to mention very tasty and nutritious, beef.
But the media will do its best to add fuel to the "mad cow" panic, just like they're fanning the flames of the totally senseless "flu epidemic" ("It could be worse than the 1918 pandemic!") panic (and the attendant "shortage" of flu vaccine) as we speak.
The flu will kill roughly 36,000 Americans this year, just like it does almost every year. Period.

Handsome Jack Morrison
*gently remove the detonator to reply via e-mail
Luvya Dubya! Daniel Drezner http://www.georgewbush.com / http://www.danieldrezner.com/blog / Glenn Reynolds - InstaPundit Steven Den Beste http://www.instapundit.com / http://www.denbeste.nu / SpinSanity Andrew Sullivan http://www.spinsanity.org / http://www.andrewsullivan.com /
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