This is what being a "companion animal," is all about. http://www.azstarnet.com/dailystar/dailystar/35270.php

Regards
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This is what being a "companion animal," is all about. http://www.azstarnet.com/dailystar/dailystar/35270.php Regards

Very, very good story. Certainly shows exactly why a bird especially a Macaw is not something to be taken lightly, or given as a gift. Sounds like this was one very lucky bird. The owners had no idea what they were getting into, but I'm glad they fell in love with the bird and finally learned how to handle him. I had to laugh when reading it as I had just finished a wrestling session with my Macaw.
The letting the bird fly free makes me nervous though. They are playing with fire there, and I sure hope they remain lucky. It could easily turn tragic.

25% graduate functional illiterates. We should remove the warning labels from everything and let nature take care of the problem. Peter Weisbach
The letting the bird fly free makes me nervous though. They are playing with fire there, and I sure hope they remain lucky. It could easily turn tragic.

Exactly what I thought, Alex. They ought to clip him enough that he can't reach roof altitude!! Also, a harness might be a good idea when they're out.
Becky
The letting the bird fly free makes me nervous though. ... sure hope they remain lucky. It could easily turn tragic.

Exactly what I thought, Alex. They ought to clip him enough that he can't reach roof altitude!! Also, a harness might be a good idea when they're out.

It could be they're hoping the bird will fly off. I have my BCC because it flew out of a tree and landed on a neighbors shoulder. The neighbor tried for a month to find the owner. I suspect the bird was encouraged to leave the previous owner. He is rather noisy. He remains fully flightworthy and he's my cuddliest bird.
There are lots of folks who freefly their birds, and don't tell us we should freefly ours. So I won't tell them that they shouldn't freefly theirs. All those good folks whose birds are strong and confident flyers - "birds" in every sense of the word - that actually recognize their homes from the air, do reliable recalls, and know how to fly down (a hard thing to learn, and impossible to get a handle of for a bird without flight capability) do a great job with their birds and don't lose them, like the "but he was clipped and I thought he couldn't fly!" folks do.
It's a treat to be on lists with the freeflight folks and read about - and see pictures of - birds who are still 100% bird and not feathered rocks. Their training is amazing and their abilities are truly awe-inspiring! Emotion: smile Maybe some of us wouldn't do it - but it's quite a jump from "I would never do that with my birds!" to "Nobody should do that with their birds!".

owly
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There are lots of folks who freefly their birds, and don't tell us we should freefly ours. So I won't ... and confident flyers - "birds" in every sense of the word - that actually recognize their homes from the air,

If his bird can recognize his home from all those places they take it, that's impressive. My feeling is that circumstances can't be predicted, and the bird could end up flying into a strange situation, away from the comfort of his home, that could be harmful.

All my birds are free flighted, although they remain in the house at all times. I don't tell anyone what they should do, but I still see the owner's behaviour as careless.
Becky
Circumstances can't be predicted if ground our birds or keep them behind bars its whole life either - cage accidents are a reality, even choking on food happens. I've been interested in (but no plans to do it with my own birds) free flight with parrots for quite a while and know of only one lost bird among them. I know, however, of many many more lost clipped birds, or accidents in homes, including in cages. Life itself is a risk, we each have to assume our own acceptable risk levels for ourselves and our pets I guess...mine won't be yours and yours won't be theirs.

My birds are also flighted...and many would consider us "careless" as well because we let our birds be birds...such is the world of people who know better than us what is best for our birds, eh?
owly
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- Check shipping status from our site!
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Sherry, of course we all have the right to make judgments regarding our birds and utilize our own belief systems. I only respond to these types of threads when the guilt card comes out: "You're depriving your birds of.."
A friend of mine Chris Biro free flights his birds in shows, he has lost a couple to hawks, in public, at shows. Me, I choose not to take that risk, you all do as you so choose.
Oh and gee I have not lost any birds to accidents, choking on food or cages..
Bob Wheeler

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Sherry, of course we all have the right to make judgments regarding our birds and utilize our own belief systems. ... on food or cages.. Bob Wheeler Check out our web site, A few new features and new pictures. http://www.onemorebird.com /
And this guy I assume is a professional, since he is showing birds. What I meant was the article showed these two bought a Macaw and had no idea what they were doing. They sound like the bird has become a beloved pet, but they waited 4 years to try to find out what they were doing wrong, and now allow the bird to "occasionally fly up in a tree or on the roof".

This is what made me cringe. I certainly hope and pray they NEVER have to watch as a Hawk swoops down and takes the bird while he is on a roof, see him fly down just in time to get hit by a car. They are still learning, and I hope they decide on their own it's not wise to allow the bird to get on the roof.

25% graduate functional illiterates. We should remove the warning labels from everything and let nature take care of the problem. Peter Weisbach
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