Hello - I've recently acquired two new Sulcata's. I already had, what I thought, was a female, but since the addition of the other two, my orginal 'female' seems to mount the larger of the two new ones. Is this some kind of posturing for superiority? I don't know if this is what females do to other females (i suspect the one being mounted is a female as well) vs. what I've seen males tend to do to each other (flip each other over etc.)
Is it possible my 80plus pound 'female' is really a male despite the lack of curvature in the carapace? Help!
Oh, also, the smaller of my two new ones seems to have parts of his / her shell flaking off. What would cause that? I'm not sure what kind of care they both had with the previous owner.
Thanks!
Steve
Hello - I've recently acquired two new Sulcata's. I already had, what I thought, was a female, but since the ... What would cause that? I'm not sure what kind of care they both had with the previous owner. Thanks! Steve

I have definite female Greeks that do the same thing every winter. Never happens in the summer, indoors or out.
The ramming, mounting and even the vocalization acting just like a male. Hormones must go nuts this time of year.
Last year i also had a female that wouldn't stop digging nests, stopped eating and seemed depressed.
Vet x rayed her no eggs, separated in case of illness, when alone eating resumed, she has been with the others again and so far is fine this winter. I had read the digging behavior can follow introduction of a new cage mate(male or female).
Mine are together year round and this year no digging but very aggressive ramming between the largest 2 females(same one initiates all the time, the other never does).
After feeding it stops, seems to be content right after a meal until next morning then same thing until feeding.
I used to feed every other day but i have to feed daily to stop the aggression.
New table will be ready soon, It's only one she regularly bothers, a couple others rarely get rammed, no mounting.