I have 4' chain link fencing around my yard. I am not interested in replacing the fencing at this time, and it would be a rather complicated ordeal due to bushes and trees, not to mention pretty pricey.

Over the years, erosion, yard work by neighbors as well as ourselves, etc, the bottom of the fence has been damaged or there is a gap under much of it. While it's handy for the bunnies to be able to escape the yard since the bottom of the fence flexes (some locations more significantly than others), it's not so handy that a certain young Golden thinks he should follow them.
I have tent stakes pounded in on some sections, but they seem to get loose over time, and due to trees and bushes, as well as the fence itself, hammering them in is a difficult angle to achieve. Also, some of the gaps are more significant than others, and the tent stakes aren't strong enough to bring the fence down to ground level.

I'm visualizing something not too ugly, semi-rigid, and maybe 6" high, that I can attach to the fence poles and/or to the ground itself, and perhaps wire/staple/tie the chain link fence to as well. Depending on how attractive it is, it may go on my side of the fence or a neighbor's side. So far, garden edging seems like it may be a possibility, but most of it seems "finished" on one side only, and I'd like it to be not-so-ugly from both my view and that of my neighbors.

Has anyone faced this issue and found a good product, or can anyone think of something that may fit the bill? Would a cable with turnbuckles do it? I wish I had a bottom rail on the fence, but that isn't to be, so I'd appreciate any good ideas!
Before I get any stupid answers, I supervise the dogs, but have had to tell Rudy NO - he may NOT go after the bunny/squirrel/bird/investigate the whatever in the neighbor's yard. When it's bedtime, the yard is rather dark, and I'd like to know that I have a secure fence, particularly when a petsitter is here instead of me.

Janet Boss
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
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I'm visualizing something not too ugly, semi-rigid, and maybe 6" high, that I can attach to the fence poles and/or to the ground itself, and perhaps wire/staple/tie the chain link fence to as well.

This is totally lazy and will require regular maintenance, but you can attach hardware cloth to your fence (some overlap - say 3-6") and have it be long enough so that it's about 6" longer than it takes to touch the ground. Mount it and bend it inside the fence and stake it to the ground. That is to say, have it form an 'L' on the inside of your fence.
Personally, I tend to prefer putting in the effort up front and doing something durable, but as with so many things, it depends on your priorities and resources.

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

If you can't say it clearly, you don't understand it yourself John Searle
in thread (Email Removed) (Melinda Shore) whittled the following words:
I'm visualizing something not too ugly, semi-rigid, and maybe 6" ... and perhaps wire/staple/tie the chain link fence to as well.

This is totally lazy and will require regular maintenance, but you can attach hardware cloth to your fence (some overlap ... effort up front and doing something durable, but as with so many things, it depends on your priorities and resources.

I did this two. I attached the hardware cloth with hog rings, and bent it over, and laid paving tiles over the hardware cloth. Grass now grows over the paving tiles, and you can't see their are there, but it solved all escape problems of dogs burrowing under. But the beagle still scales the fence.
This is totally lazy and will require regular maintenance, but you can attach hardware cloth to your fence (some overlap ... up front and doing something durable, but as with so many things, it depends on your priorities and resources.

I thought of the approach you mention, and my concern is about the part that extends on the ground - lawn mower incompatibility.

I would love to wave a magic wand and have an attractive wooden privacy fence installed around the whole yard, but between costs and logistics, I hate the thought of having to actually DO that!
Also, I think I'd have to install a taller fence that I'd prefer to, because of the pool. We're grandfathered in with this one.

Thanks for the thoughts!

Janet Boss
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
I thought of the approach you mention, and my concern is about the part that extends on the ground - lawn mower incompatibility.

It shouldn't interfere, I wouldn't think. Stake/staple down the edges.

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

If you can't say it clearly, you don't understand it yourself John Searle
in thread Janet Boss (Email Removed) whittled the following words:
I thought of the approach you mention, and my concern is about the part that extends on the ground - lawn mower incompatibility.

With the low lying pavers holding down hardware cloth (tent stakes WERE lawn mower incompatable!), we've never had an issue with the lawn mower. Grass now covers the pavers and you can't tell there is extra security there.
It shouldn't interfere, I wouldn't think. Stake/staple down the edges.

I have some of those long staples/stakes for landscape/weedblock cloth. I think I'll hit HD tomorrow and see what may be available and not too ugly!

Janet Boss
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
Would a cable with turnbuckles do it?

Maybe.
Something like this?
http://www.a-1fenceduluth.com/laces10.htm
I wish I had a bottom rail on the fence, but that isn't to be

Why not?
http://www.a-1fenceduluth.com/laces11.htm

Handsome Jack Morrison
Scientists threatened with death for 'climate denial'! http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2007/03/11/ngreen211.xml The Great Global Warminng Swindle - the video:
Why so much medical research is rot:
http://www.economist.com/science/displaystory.cfm?story id=8733754
I wish I had a bottom rail on the fence, but that isn't to be

Why not? http://www.a-1fenceduluth.com/laces11.htm

Hmm - I can't figure out how they attach at the posts. I assumed (wrongly?) that the had to be fit over the posts (which would mean removing the fence, although I suppose we CAN detach the wire fencing, do that, and attach it again). I don't think we can get to some parts of the fence, but I don't think they are problem areas either.

Janet Boss
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
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