Hello,
Can anyone help?
I have a Greenfinch - he was a wild bird until he was caught and injured by a local cat (he has lost the use of one wing and one eye).

Despite these traumas, he has flourished for four years and seemed to have adapted well to a more restricted life as a rescue bird in a cage.
Just recently his bill has become distorted - there appears to be an overgrowth of the upper part (and his bill now looks more like a raptor's!).
I am concerned in case this distortion will affect his eating. Is this overgrowth something that can be corrected by changing his diet or environment? Is there some action that I can take? I don't want to risk clipping or filing the bill without knowing what I am doing!

Many thanks
Roz
Hello, Can anyone help? I have a Greenfinch - he was a wild bird until he was caught and injured ... that I can take? I don't want to risk clipping or filing the bill without knowing what I am doing!

Don't tell anyone you have a wild caught greenfinch. Regardless of the reasons you are breaking the law by owning it.
Without knowing what sort of environment you have provided it is hard to know how to improve it.
Are you providing it with cuttlefish bone? Does it have fresh twigs to chew on? Bad distortion will affect his eating ability but as he is an unrung bird, you would be opening yourself to prosecution by taking it to a vet even.
Hello, Can anyone help? I have a Greenfinch - he ... or filing the bill without knowing what I am doing!

Don't tell anyone you have a wild caught greenfinch. Regardless of the reasons you are breaking the law by owning ... as he is an unrung bird, you would be opening yourself to prosecution by taking it to a vet even.

Get a letter from your vet explaining that the bird cant be released into the wild and that is all you need to keep the bird legally.
Don't tell anyone you have a wild caught greenfinch. Regardless ... yourself to prosecution by taking it to a vet even.

Get a letter from your vet explaining that the bird cant be released into the wild and that is all you need to keep the bird legally.

not necessarily Ray. SOmeone locally to me had his raptor ( cannot remember which one) put to sleep by the RSPCA because they said that a disabled wild bird was better off dead than in captivity :0(
The bird needs it's bill fixed soon by a bird vet (not a regular vet). You can't do it yourself. As others have mentioned, you may have some issues getting a wild bird treated. Not sure how to get around it but obviously it can be done. Try the rec.birds newsgroup.
Dave
Get a letter from your vet explaining that the bird ... that is all you need to keep the bird legally.

not necessarily Ray. SOmeone locally to me had his raptor ( cannot remember which one) put to sleep by the RSPCA because they said that a disabled wild bird was better off dead than in captivity :0(

I would never ever call the RSPCA regarding birds. I'm lucky in having 2 of the finest avian vets locally (Chester zoo being one) and they are always willing to help me with wild birds. Did you hear about the lady who found an injured owl? She called the RSPCA for help and they said feed it weetabix!!! She found a bird rescue who took it in. The only birds the RSPCA will help are swans, as long as they have a tv crew with them.
Clip it with regular nail clippers or file it down with a nail file so it is the same length as the bottom. If the beak is closed it will be difficult to make a mistake. I clip all my birds beaks and nails if they need it (rarely) and it gets easier each time.