Hi! I was wondering if there's any kind of commercially available insect that is small enough to be fed to baby fence lizards?
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Hi! I was wondering if there's any kind of commercially available insect that is small enough to be fed to baby fence lizards?

Wingless fruit flies. :-)
Also, pinhead crickets.
HTH?

Om.
"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-***." -Jack Nicholson
Hi! I was wondering if there's any kind of commercially available insect that is small enough to b e fed to baby fence lizards?

Wingless fruit flies. :-) Also, pinhead crickets.

Where can these be obtained?
Welcome! And congrats on the babies.. ;-)

Thanks. They're actually just wild lizards that live in my cactus garden and front patio area. (I live in San Diego.) I've been feeding the adults for years, just for fun, and have them trained to eat from my hand. On hot days if they're hungry sometimes they run right up to me as soon as they see me! Anyway, the local female has been laying her eggs in the cactus garden, several clutches since May, and they've finally started to hatch. I thought it might be fun to try to feed the little guys but of course they're way too small for the meal worms I give the adults.
There's also a couple alligator lizards that come out at night to catch June bugs attracted to the light, and they'll eat from my hand too. As fierce as they are if you try to catch them, they're surprisingly gentle feeders. Here's a pic:
http://albums.photo.epson.com/j/ViewPhoto?u=3009006&a=30055776&p=72357397

And here's a pic of one of the fence lizards, taken a few years ago:

http://albums.photo.epson.com/j/ViewPhoto?u=3009006&a=30075449&p=60284205

My wife and I really enjoy being able to interact with all these cute little critters.
Welcome! And congrats on the babies.. ;-)

Thanks. They're actually just wild lizards that live in my cactus garden and front patio area. (I live in San ... few years ago: http://albums.photo.epson.com/j/ViewPhoto?u=3009006&a=30075449&p=60284205 My wife and I really enjoy being able to interact with all these cute little critters.

That is so totally cool!
That had to have taken a LOT of time and patience to get them to trust you like that. :-)
Well done!!
Do you breed your own mealworms? It's quite easy.
You should also be able to propagate the wingless fruit flies. Try googling for some instructions on formulas and housing.
Om.
"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-***." -Jack Nicholson
Tha nks. They're actually just wild lizards that live in ... being able to interact with all these cute little critters.

That is so totally cool! That had to have taken a LOT of time and patience to get them to trust you like that. :-) Well done!!

Thanks. It's not too difficult with the fence lizards. Since they hang out near the patio and driveway, we walk by them all the time so they're kind of used to us to begin with. I started by just tossing a bug or worm near them, making sure they saw me do it. Pretty soon they associated me with food and then it was easier to get their trust when began holding the worm out and waiting for them to come take it.

The alligator lizards are trickier for a couple of reasons. One, they're more secretive and aren't out in the open very often. Two, their hunting technique is to sloowly creep up on their prey, so you have to be really patient and very still.
Do you breed your own mealworms? It's quite easy.

Never thought of that. I just buy 'em from a local tropical fish store. I only need them during the warmer months even with the mild winters here in San Diego, the fence lizards still hibernate much of the winter.
BTW, something cool I've noticed about the fence lizards is that they change color a bit to help regulate their temperature. On cool days they turn almost black, which absorbs heat better. When it's hot they become lighter brown and you can see more colors and patterns.
Hi! I was wondering if there's any kind of commercially available insect that is small enough to be fed to baby fence lizards?

Pinhead crickets, perhaps?
That is so totally cool! That had to have taken ... get them to trust you like that. :-) Well done!!

Thanks. It's not too difficult with the fence lizards. Since they hang out near the patio and driveway, we walk ... was easier to get their trust when began holding the worm out and waiting for them to come take it.

I might have to try that with our porch geckos. ;-)

I've hand-fed jumping spiders but that's about it. If I can ever find that picture, I'll have to scan it.
The alligator lizards are trickier for a couple of reasons. One, they're more secretive and aren't out in the open very often. Two, their hunting technique is to sloowly creep up on their prey, so you have to be really patient and very still.

I love alligator lizards! Such sedate creatures and they get so big!
Do you breed your own mealworms? It's quite easy.

Never thought of that. I just buy 'em from a local tropical fish store. I only need them during the warmer months even with the mild winters here in San Diego, the fence lizards still hibernate much of the winter.

You can also purchase them in bulk. They will last a good 3 months in the crisper drawer in the refrigerator if you bed them in a mix of bran and bird seed or hen scratch. I used to get them in lots of 5,000 to 20,000 from rainbow mealworms when we were doing bird and mammal rehabbing. Baby skunks could go thru a LOT of them when we were in the process of weaning! :-)
BTW, something cool I've noticed about the fence lizards is that they change color a bit to help regulate their ... black, which absorbs heat better. When it's hot they become lighter brown and you can see more colors and patterns.

Neat observation!
I just love their blue bellies.. ;-D

Om.
"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-***." -Jack Nicholson
http://albums.photo.epson.com/j/ViewPhoto?u=3009006&a=30055776&p=72357397 And here's a pic of one of the fence lizards, taken a few years ago: http://albums.photo.epson.com/j/ViewPhoto?u=3009006&a=30075449&p=60284205 My wife and I really enjoy being able to interact with all these cute little critters.

How wonderful! Thanks for sharing! I'd never seen an alligator lizard before your photo.
Cindy
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