How cold would it have to be outside for half of a cat's ears to get frostbite and break off? I'm asking because a few years ago a stray showed up on my doorstep and half of her ears looked like they had been cut off. I later asked the vet and he said they broke off from frostbite. I'd like to know just how cold it would have to get for this to happen. Around here it usually gets down to between 8-15 degrees Farenheit at nights and between maybe 25-40 during the day. I suppose it could have been from the wind chill but it usually doesn't get windy here in the winter. I thought cats were pretty good at finding warm places to stay so I'm really curious about this.

Also, could a cat suffer any sort of brain damage from this cold weather? Because this particular cat didn't seem to have all her oars in the water if you know what I mean. And most of her children (especially the males) didn't seem to be too bright either.
How cold would it have to be outside for half of a cat's ears to get frostbite and break off? ... the winter. I thought cats were pretty good at finding warm places to stay so I'm really curious about this.[/nq]I had a cat with ragged ears from frostbite that I adopted from a shelter and we experience winters that on average would be about 25 degrees Fahrenheit at night. All it would take is one really cold night. A cat's ears are so exposed and the tissue there is so thin and sensitive and unprotected that I doubt it would take much to cause frostbite. Unlike human ears, a cat's ears seem cool to the touch generally so I would speculate that the temperature of the ears is lower than the temperature of the rest of a cat's body.

I would think even an hour or so outside in really cold weather would damage the vasculature of a cat's ears but I don't have any empirical evidence. The structure seems more delicate than human ears and we can get frostbitten ears easily on a very cold day. It hurts just to think about it.
Also, could a cat suffer any sort of brain damage from this cold weather?

No, but sometimes I think that I must be damaged for choosing to live in a cold climate.
Because this particular cat didn't seem to have all her oars
in the water if you know what I mean. And most of her children (especially the males) didn't seem to be too bright either.

Even if she had somehow suffered a brain injury, her babies would not inherit an acquired deficit. It sounds like the cat in question is perhaps just not as clever as some others, and maybe that includes the ability to seek out warm hiding places.
"Mike" (Email Removed) a écrit dans le message de [nq:1]How cold would it have to be outside for half of a cat's ears to get frostbite and break off? ... you know what I mean. And most of her children (especially the males) didn't seem to be too bright either.Last winter, where I live, we have seen some lows that were marked on the mercury, -38c, no wind at all. I have not seen that often before (if ever). There are strays in the little town were I work, and one of them lost both his ears from the frost bites, but I've seen that most other cats remained intact. It depends on the cat's ability to survive. I had notice that this cat had trouble taking his share when fed. Even if he had an abundance of food under his nose, he acted as if he could only catch the crumbs left by the others.

My guess is that he had some kind of illness. I saw him once this summer, and he was still only skin and bones.. and there was no reason for this because there is an abundance of prey at this time of year, and many fields are close around, its a very rural area. So it depends on the individual cat, his weakness or strength or health condition to start with. Weak is a strong word though, because that particular stray did after all, survive the terrible winter we had last year!!

Elaine
I had notice that this cat had trouble taking his share when fed. Even if he had an abundance of ... abundance of prey at this time of year, and many fields are close around, its a very rural area. Elaine

That´s so sad. The poor thing might have a tooth ache and simply can´t bite. Can´t someone trap him and have his teeth looked at? Emotion: sad Really sad.
"Liz" (Email Removed) a écrit dans le message de [nq:2]I had notice that this cat had trouble taking his ... fields are close around, its a very rural area. Elaine
That´s so sad. The poor thing might have a tooth ache and simply can´t bite. Can´t someone trap him and have his teeth looked at? Emotion: sad Really sad.

Mm well, he could munch fine once he had the idea that the food was really his. It was more a behavior thing. I have not seen my strays for months now. But the cold is returning and so I should see them soon. I will give them the best help I can.
Elaine